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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Nikon White lenses
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12/08/2004 10:29:16 PM · #1
Just noticed on B & H's site that Nikon is now making (Gasp!) White lenses!
12/08/2004 10:31:34 PM · #2
Originally posted by doctornick:

Just noticed on B & H's site that Nikon is now making (Gasp!) White lenses!


I think they've been doing that for a while.

Why are you browsing through Nikon glass anyway? Thinking about going over to the other side?
12/08/2004 10:37:18 PM · #3
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

I think they've been doing that for a while.

Why are you browsing through Nikon glass anyway? Thinking about going over to the other side?


Nooo just curious to see what the competition is doing. :)
12/09/2004 08:14:41 AM · #4
It's not white, it's 'Light-grey' :-)

I wouldn't buy one - stands out too much. Black is better!
12/09/2004 08:26:58 AM · #5
Yes, Nikon has been selling some of their lenses in light-gray for a while.

And for those that think Canon does this on their telephoto lenses just so they "stand out", think again.

Precision optics are affected by temperature (my physics is a bit rusty, but something to do with air being different densities at different temperatures, with light waves bending differently, etc.), and anybody that has shot in full-sun for a while knows how hot black metal gets after just a short time. Canon's light-colored "paint job" is done for performance reasons.

And that is why Nikon offers the option (at a price premium) on their "long glass"...

So no, black is not better...

Message edited by author 2004-12-09 08:29:06.
12/09/2004 08:29:14 AM · #6
The reason the light grey lens are now being produced has nothing to do with cosmetics. If you shoot outdoor activities out in the sun for long periods of time large dark lenses absorb huge amounts of heat causing internal expansion, etc. Also suddenly bring those heated lens into say an air-conditioned club house can cause internal condensation. The light colored lens were made to reflect the sunlight to keep the lenses cooler. I assume they have also kept the traditional lenses in production to please wildlife photographers and others that want the darker lenses for their own reasons.
12/09/2004 08:29:38 AM · #7
Originally posted by doctornick:

Just noticed on B & H's site that Nikon is now making (Gasp!) White lenses!


Oh, that's just disgusting :) Hopefully most Nikon users will stay with their black lenses... It's a little hiccup of happiness for me every time I see long white lenses around!
12/09/2004 08:32:26 AM · #8
BTW Bronica had white lens (produced by Nikon) before Canon did.

Nikon had 2 short mount lens for their rangefinder's reflex housings back in 1955-58 that were both light grey, and later produced several light grey extreme telephotos in the sixties that were light grey. It is nothing new.


Message edited by author 2004-12-09 08:36:55.
12/09/2004 01:05:47 PM · #9
The 'best' 70-200 F2.8 lens for a Minolta 7D is also white/ light gray.
//www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=300783&is=USA
And at USD 1900 it is horribly expensive.


12/09/2004 01:17:34 PM · #10
Originally posted by EddyG:


And that is why Nikon offers the option (at a price premium) on their "long glass"...

So no, black is not better...


When I bought my 70-200 the price for white and black was the same. But at this moment the 'white' one is indeed a bit more expensive (app. USD 25). Could also have something to do with availability and demand. If you are able to hand over some cash (vs CC or a loan) there should be no problem to get the white one for the price of a black one.

I chose the black version because I do not plan to sit in the sun for a while or else I'll cover the lens if needed. The primary reason for me was that a white version makes me stand out too much. A long lens draws enough attention already, a white one only makes it worse. And I paid a very nice price for it, ooooh yes. I had to drive 2+2 hours for it, but it saved me 500 to 800 euro (shop with a very good reputation, pro wildlife and pj's). :)

Anyway; whatever you shoot with, long fast high quality glass rocks!


12/09/2004 01:30:55 PM · #11
for those of us shooting in -30 degrees Farenheit weather, black is goooooood. takes longer for the AF to freeze up completely. ;)

In truth, from what I understand the cold weather that I regularly endure is harder on lenses than the heat that those further south shoot in. it can affect the AF motor, and in extreme cases can make the glass more susceptible to crack, given that metal contracts more than glass and puts pressure on the lens.

I shot my yellow submission at -20C/-5F jumping in and out of my warm car and saw no evidence of condensation. I would also stand to reason that fixed aperature lenses (ones that don't get longer when you zoom) would withstand the change better.

Dunno. once jacko told me that Black was Badass, so I'm going with that.

P-ness

12/09/2004 02:00:33 PM · #12
Originally posted by hyperfocal:

Also suddenly bring those heated lens into say an air-conditioned club house can cause internal condensation.


I think you'll find it's the other way around - take a cold lens (or whatever) into a warm environment, and you'll get condensation.

Cold beer on a warm day, anyone?

T
12/09/2004 04:48:23 PM · #13
Originally posted by EddyG:



Precision optics are affected by temperature (my physics is a bit rusty, but something to do with air being different densities at different temperatures, with light waves bending differently, etc.), and anybody that has shot in full-sun for a while knows how hot black metal gets after just a short time.

So no, black is not better...


It has to with the absorption & emmissivity of the paint. Typically, black paint is both more absorptive and emits heat more effectively than white paint. So, for a given exposure to radiation (in this case, light) the black will absorb more heat into the lens. However, if you took two identical lenses and heated them to the same temperature, the black lens would cool faster.
12/09/2004 04:52:43 PM · #14
Originally posted by WobblyLegs:

Originally posted by hyperfocal:

Also suddenly bring those heated lens into say an air-conditioned club house can cause internal condensation.


I think you'll find it's the other way around - take a cold lens (or whatever) into a warm environment, and you'll get condensation.

Cold beer on a warm day, anyone?

T


Why thank you, squire...make mine a Stella!
12/09/2004 05:31:42 PM · #15
Originally posted by EddyG:


So no, black is not better...


I concur, I've heard that explanation a number of times, makes good sense.
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