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12/26/2022 12:21:19 PM · #1
I'm gonna use these two guys to illustrate a point or two and express my perspective on commenting in case anyone remotely gives a shit cares.

Welcome back, Anthony, and I'm sure I'm just one of the many people here who are appreciative of your enthusiasm and time you've devoted to the community.

That said, I want to share my personal preference and thoughts on commenting.

What *I* want is your thoughts, feelings, impressions on my image. I want to know how it makes you feel, or doesn't. I want to know if you like it, dislike it, or it barely merits a "Meh....".

Now the issue that presents itself is that there's no way to differentiate between people who will receive suggestions and/or happily and those who wish to garner thoughts and impressions rather than suggestions as to how to improve the image.

I'm curious to know if I'm in a minority in my preferences or not, and whether my preferences mirror others as far as wanting impressions rather than advice.

Okay.....moving on to offer more personal perspectives.....

This from Anthony:

Originally posted by Rankles:

It's only recently that I've started to accept compliments on my photography (everything I'd ever done before was obviously awful and I was the worst photographer ever if anyone tells me otherwise they're just patronising etc etc).


This, to me, is a serious problem for all of us. We're all our best/worst critics. The silly part of that is that if there wasn't some legitimate basis for each of us top develop our photography skills, we wouldn't be here.

I would feel no compunction about stating that everyone actively participating here has a distinct ability to see the world around them with an interesting perspective.

I'm also pretty sure that we all share a love for the preservation of the beauty and amazing life we share on this strange blue marble.

One of the first things I tell anyone just getting started is that when they go to edit their images is to look for "that thing" that made them go "Ooh!" and pull the camera up, frame and shoot the image.

I explain to them that there will be plenty of time to pick the work apart later 'cause we all are the most capable of being hard on ourselves.

So no matter how new and/or inexperienced you feel, only you have *your* vision of the world as you see it through your lens.

If someone says "Wow!", they're probably genuine. You thought enough of it to shoot, edit, and get it out there. So yeah, ya did good! Allow yourself that no matter where you are on your journey.

And this from Steve's daughter:"

Originally posted by Yo_Spiff:

My daughter is participating here again after many years, but at this point she doesn't feel qualified to vote or critique others work. Working on that.


Okay.....THIS is a biggie. The very newest photographer on their first day is more than qualified to express their feelings and impressions on the impact that a photo has on/for them.

My own personal DPC story: I got here in early August of 2006. Near the end of the month I voted on a challenge and this image popped up.

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It pierced me right to the core of my soul. It spoke to me like nothing had before.

As an older guy, this hit me really hard because I lost relatives in the Great Wars (WTF was "great" about them, but....).

I saw the friends and family of mine, the ones who came back anyway, forever changed, their innocence ground into the mud of the jungles of Southeast Asia.

So here' a guy, half my age, who wasn't in the military, with that special kind of vision. I messaged the photog, told him how he touched my soul and the next thing I knew, we were old friends and I had a mentor.

Thing is, what he helped me with wasn't photography, but how to discover and honor the photographer that I am. To just shoot. To look for what I wanted from that image.....and the next one.

To not be afraid of my camera....or of my perceived lack of ability.

Getting help is easy. I have *never* asked anyone for help or suggestions that did anything but give 100% with the hopes they could be there for me.

I know that's not 'cause of my sparkling personality, but the unspoken commitment we seem to all find as part of this community.

So being here at DPC is a ticket to the adventure that is your life and passion of photography.

And there are a bunch of good people here who know what they're doing and are more than willing to share.

Originally posted by Yo_Spiff:

IMO, it's a useful skill to be able to accept constructive criticism on ones art and most of the people who have stuck around here posses that quality. You cannot improve if you cannot look at your work objectively.

One of my biggest learning experiences was in my first couple of years here. When I voted on challenges I made myself comment on most of the 5's I gave out. The ones that are great are easy to comment on, and the bad ones are also easy to figure out the flaws. But those entries in the middle are tougher. The ones that aren't bad, but don't grab your interest either. I learned a lot from that commenting.


100% this.....

I don't know anyone here who hasn't experienced this.

Anyway, my last whiny-ass, entitled opinion is this: If you're going to comment, give up the raw impressions. You like it/don't like it, it's lackluster/breathtaking, the way the {blank} does that thing, the way you {blank} the area around your subject, whatever.....

What ultimately prompted this is that I often get comments suggesting that I change "X" to make a better image, when "X" was an intentional move on my part for effect.

I don't know about anyone else, but the majority of my images are absolutely 100%, or more, the way I want them when I click on "Enter this challenge".

It also makes me roll my eyes when I get a comment that says, "You shouldn't have used (technique/feature) on this image in that way.

When I didn't.......

That one legit bugs the snot out of me.

Not sure why I was feeling all introspective and hadda dump it on y'all, but there you have it.

Just entered my 801st challenge, right on top of a Red Ribbon and a Top Ten(6th).

I'm no ribbon hog, but DPC sure has done wonders at making me into a good photographer.

Oh.....and Happy Holidays!


12/26/2022 12:51:00 PM · #2
Interesting thoughts. The main complaint I saw about lack of commenting was a vibe of "how are we supposed to improve?" so whilst I generally stop short of flat-out saying how I'd do something, I do sometimes give thoughts on how the image might be elevated in those perfect, almost mythical conditions for a certain type of shot (many of which are of course cliche, colourful cloudy sunsets for landscapes or perhaps thick fog for the forest and so on which may in turn be a big turn off for others).

I've been trying to comment on everything and for the most part I try to be constructive, so I guess unless a photo has that WOW effect on me (and many times my comments pretty much boils down to that) I still feel people want to see comments and so would appreciate something else.

Honestly only 1 or 2 images a contest are going to make me go WOW or as you say in your post, make me feel something. This is of course very subjective but the majority of images simply won't make me feel anything at all even if it's a competent image and maybe even a WOW image for others. So I feel writing something sincere is the best way after that, but then that's when the 'what ifs? come out.

I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts on this!

Incidentally I say this now being in four current challenges plus the one just finished with I think... five comments in total over all five contests during the voting.

I'd personally love to see more comments on just about anything, especially as I get many what I would call strong votes such as 4's and 8's on the same picture to which I'd really appreciate knowing what sucked/suceeded in it even if it means telling me how you'd have approached it.

I think that's the other thing too - it could be a semantic thing - rather than hear how someone would've achieved the same photo with technical critique, I'm much more interested in how they would approach the situation and subject, which feels like a different and more interesting discussion to have when it comes to discussing the pros and cons of a photo IMO.

Message edited by author 2022-12-26 12:51:16.
12/26/2022 12:55:04 PM · #3
I agree that everyone is "qualified" to say what they like/don't like about an image, and it's been "proven" that you will learn more about making photos you like from the comments you make than from those you receive.

We have a couple of tutorials which may help/inspire those who are hesitant to comment ...

9 Guidelines for Giving and Receiving Feedback

Commenting For Beginners (A Non-Analytical Approach)
12/26/2022 12:56:04 PM · #4
I love receiving comments, but I probably pay more attention to the technical comments (your picture sucks because...) than the artistic ones (I don't like your taste).

It's a shame that non-members can't vote/comment on member challenges.
12/26/2022 01:42:42 PM · #5
Damn Jeb. I was going to read this but I need to grab a cup of coffee first. :-)
12/26/2022 01:52:10 PM · #6
Originally posted by Rankles:

Interesting thoughts. The main complaint I saw about lack of commenting was a vibe of "how are we supposed to improve?" so whilst I generally stop short of flat-out saying how I'd do something, I do sometimes give thoughts on how the image might be elevated in those perfect, almost mythical conditions for a certain type of shot (many of which are of course cliche, colourful cloudy sunsets for landscapes or perhaps thick fog for the forest and so on which may in turn be a big turn off for others).


I get that. But rather than recommend to someone that they change something to suit your definition of elevate, why not tell them why it doesn't or that in your opinion it needs something else to reach you.

Someone else may have been moved by the same image that gave you a "Meh...".

I love it when I have an image that gets equal parts 2s and 9s. That means I've moved two diametrically opposed groups of viewers with the same image.

Originally posted by Rankles:

I've been trying to comment on everything and for the most part I try to be constructive, so I guess unless a photo has that WOW effect on me (and many times my comments pretty much boils down to that) I still feel people want to see comments and so would appreciate something else.


As I said, I'm *sure* your efforts are both welcomed and appreciated. I've gotten a couple from you that I both was humbled by and truly appreciated.

I got one that made me ask "WTF?" and want to slap you. LOL!

But even that one had a perspective. I will openly admit that I don't want anyone to tell me what to do. Ever. I consider that self-assured.

I had one friend tell me I was a f*cking knothead. I have *NO* idea why.

Originally posted by Rankles:

Honestly only 1 or 2 images a contest are going to make me go WOW or as you say in your post, make me feel something.


Those ones are the easy ones to comment on.

Originally posted by Rankles:

This is of course very subjective but the majority of images simply won't make me feel anything at all even if it's a competent image and maybe even a WOW image for others. So I feel writing something sincere is the best way after that, but then that's when the 'what ifs? come out.


Like Steve said, the ones in the middle of the pack, the ones that didn't speak to you, the ones that were easy to blow on by while tossing a mid pack vote out.....those are the ones we really need to comment on because they make us really look, really see, what we're trying to achieve.

Originally posted by Rankles:

I'd personally love to see more comments on just about anything, especially as I get many what I would call strong votes such as 4's and 8's on the same picture to which I'd really appreciate knowing what sucked/succeeded in it even if it means telling me how you'd have approached it.


Yah, I'd rather have any comments than none. Even the ones I disagree with or that I consider wrong (You used {this and such technique} when I didn't) have something that sparked the comment in the first place even if it was someone doing it for their own reasons.

Originally posted by Rankles:

I think that's the other thing too - it could be a semantic thing - rather than hear how someone would've achieved the same photo with technical critique, I'm much more interested in how they would approach the situation and subject, which feels like a different and more interesting discussion to have when it comes to discussing the pros and cons of a photo IMO.


I think this may be where I have issues. I simply don't really care how they do it in California. I'm seeking the vision *I* see in my mind's eye.

If/when I have an image that I cannot get what I want out of it, I move on and it never sees the light of day that its weakness (as I see it) is released to the world.

I do still come here because I know I will be accorded the efforts of the community to rate my images and through the voting and commenting process receive the feedback I do need, whether I like it or not.

Thanks for that!
12/26/2022 02:06:56 PM · #7
Originally posted by NikonJeb:

Like Steve said, the ones in the middle of the pack, the ones that didn't speak to you, the ones that were easy to blow on by while tossing a mid pack vote out.....those are the ones we really need to comment on because they make us really look, really see, what we're trying to achieve.


So with these kind of situations, where it's kind of middling and had no impression on a viewer in particular, what kind of comment would you try and provide or look for?

These are always tricky for me, and it's usually in the region where there's no 'wow' and there's also not really any technical advice to give... I'd feel a bit of an ass just saying 'this does nothing for me' but maybe that's desired by some!

Originally posted by NikonJeb:

I got one that made me ask "WTF?" and want to slap you. LOL!


Haha which one? I'm curious now, PM me if you want :) Happy to improve on how I word things so would love to know!

For what it's worth I love that your perspective is 'this is my art and I make it for me, if you love it great!' as probably most of the musicians I respect most have this attitude. Personally I don't for my own work, and maybe that's a defect, but I reckon in the overall balance of DPC it's why images are generally rated pretty much where they deserve to be overall (apart from the numerous controversial ones I'm sure we all have seen over the years!)

EDIT - I think I can guess it's one of the water ones! I don't think I was critical, this is just my favourite subject to photograph and living where I do there are so many magical combinations of clouds, mist, light, colours and shade for every subject so my meaning was more "what a great location, I'd be going there 100 times a year to get it from that same angle for every type of weather just to see which day is more spectacular than the last!"

Although looking back perhaps it does read a bit like one's wife coming down asking "how do I look?" and responding "oh, I thought you were gonna wear the black dress?"

Message edited by author 2022-12-26 14:14:35.
12/26/2022 02:18:32 PM · #8
Sure, we have preferences as to whether we like technical or emotional feedback. I appreciate both. And I believe that giving someone some technical feedback IS an emotional comment. "The lighting here just makes my heart beat faster, but that tilt is driving me crazy" is both emotional and technical.

Bottom line: we should accept all comments with gratitude.
12/26/2022 02:57:47 PM · #9
Originally posted by Rankles:

So with these kind of situations, where it's kind of middling and had no impression on a viewer in particular, what kind of comment would you try and provide or look for?

These are always tricky for me, and it's usually in the region where there's no 'wow' and there's also not really any technical advice to give... I'd feel a bit of an ass just saying 'this does nothing for me' but maybe that's desired by some!


This what makes them such a strong learning experience. I recall spending some serious time on those comments on my mid range votes, trying to determine what did or didn't work about it for me.

One of the most helpful comments I ever received was in a street photography challenge. Pawdrix was one of the best street photographers on DPC (he left DPC many years ago, unfortunately for us) and his comment was "Why are you showing me this person?"
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My street photography improved after that. This one wasn't a challenge winner or even close, but it is a personal favorite and I am quite pleased with it.
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Message edited by author 2022-12-26 14:58:35.
12/26/2022 03:17:01 PM · #10
One thing I enjoy is when I receive conflicting comments on the same aspect of my entry. It reminds me that most comments are subjective. That happened in the recent "Impressionism" challenge regarding the tilt of my entry. One comment criticizing it and one comment saying they liked the tilt. The tilt was exactly the way the shot was taken. Despite trying to hold the camera straight, when I shoot while riding, it usually has a natural tilt to it, which I find usually adds a dramatic look.
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12/26/2022 03:45:03 PM · #11
> It also makes me roll my eyes when I get a comment that says, "You shouldn't have used (technique/feature) on this image in that way

This is something I used to feel before. Early on I used to value these comments a lot. I was very eager to learn. Jeb, you gave me some good advice in the past! (Edit: I think I was asking for it!) :-) At some stage, and I don't know when exactly this was, when I got into a post critique phase (kind of what you say about you being happy with your photos, though I'm definitely not always getting what I want in my submissions, but maybe when my drive pivoted from seeking broad to personal appeal (a phrase I associate with Spiffy)) I realised that there's usually an implied "if this was my image to edit, I would have..." that's omitted from these comments, and adding that myself can take some of the... sting off comments like that.

I'm highly opinionated in how I edit my images (probably there's at least as much expression in the edit than the exposure) so it was easy for me in particular to delineate these kinds of comments like that. For somebody like you who hits broad appeal quite well and regularly, I can understand that it's harder.

I enjoyed your post. You hit on a lot of things, about personal confidence, seeing oneself as a photographer and critic and beyond. It's probably impossible to satisfy everybody, everywhere all at once! :-)

Message edited by author 2022-12-26 15:55:22.
12/26/2022 04:24:32 PM · #12
Originally posted by Rankles:

EDIT - I think I can guess it's one of the water ones! I don't think I was critical, this is just my favourite subject to photograph and living where I do there are so many magical combinations of clouds, mist, light, colours and shade for every subject so my meaning was more "what a great location, I'd be going there 100 times a year to get it from that same angle for every type of weather just to see which day is more spectacular than the last!"


LOL!

Yeah, it was this one....' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/3000-3999/3505/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1274935.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/3000-3999/3505/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1274935.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

It was a two way thing.....You would have had no possible way to know that I'm in love with this stupid bridge (Including having a 7'3" x 4' canvas hanging in my gallery).

I also have a sh*t ton of entries with the aforementioned stupid bridge.

So when I read: I wonder what different weather conditions could bring out of this shot.

All I could think of was WTF? How many examples would you like? LOL!

NTW, this one is the one I have BIG: ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/3000-3999/3015/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1247758.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/3000-3999/3015/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1247758.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Same bridge, different time and place......

Oh, and I *did* appreciate the "Wonderful location and composition." part of the comment.

Thanks!
12/26/2022 10:39:36 PM · #13
Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

At some stage, and I don't know when exactly this was, when I got into a post critique phase (kind of what you say about you being happy with your photos, though I'm definitely not always getting what I want in my submissions, but maybe when my drive pivoted from seeking broad to personal appeal (a phrase I associate with Spiffy)


Yeah, that "happy with my pic" is important. I've been entering more lately.......trying to get out of my chair and make myself work at this again.

Like you said with "that point" I got to where I realize I can pretty much get what I want when I select something and shoot it. I don't surprise myself as often with a real gem, but I also get better stuff consistently.

It does make a difference what segment you direct your efforts toward as to what you get in return.

It's funny, but some of the pictures I like best of late, and ones I feel have "more of my soul" in them, do worse score wise, but I find these one or two insightful comments on them from people I admire and respect.

I'll nail down a 5.1121 yet get two comments from "those people", and feel like I hit the lottery 'cause they liked the image.

Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

I'm highly opinionated in how I edit my images (probably there's at least as much expression in the edit than the exposure) so it was easy for me in particular to delineate these kinds of comments like that. For somebody like you who hits broad appeal quite well and regularly, I can understand that it's harder.


I'm also pleased to discover that my growth here has gotten me to a point where I've been using El Cheapo PS Elements for over a decade. And if I can't get what I want in 3-5 minutes with it, the image was crap and I move on.

I don't hammer around weird effects like I used to and my skills have cleaned up immensely. I learned here early on the PS won't fix a crappy image.

Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

I enjoyed your post. You hit on a lot of things, about personal confidence, seeing oneself as a photographer and critic and beyond.


I think that's a thing with anyone that has any kind of calling, whether it be artistic, someone whose skills enable them to excel in any line of work, to writers and thinkers.

The good ones are always the first ones to doubt themselves if they're any good. I've rarely met anyone really good with anything that truly took credit for whatever gift they had.

But it is okay to be okay with whatever talent you were graced with and run like Hell with it.

Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

It's probably impossible to satisfy everybody, everywhere all at once! :-)


And you can achieve peace within your world once you accept that. LOL!
12/27/2022 05:19:30 PM · #14
Hating sounding like a precious, needy photographer, but I just got a 3. How bad does a photo need to be to get a 3?

It would be really useful if anybody who gives a 3 or below also gives a comment about what the photo is lacking. It should be a condition of giving a low score that a meaningful comment is given at the same time.
12/27/2022 08:41:56 PM · #15
Originally posted by mikeee:

Hating sounding like a precious, needy photographer, but I just got a 3. How bad does a photo need to be to get a 3?

It would be really useful if anybody who gives a 3 or below also gives a comment about what the photo is lacking. It should be a condition of giving a low score that a meaningful comment is given at the same time.

We tried making that mandatory -- it didn't work.

FWIW I think some people both use the whole scale and more-or-less rank the photos, so that 3 may not necessarily mean "bad" but rather "less-liked" than most of the other entries -- not quite the same thing.

Also, note how your reaction to that vote might look to the person who gave it -- I know if it was me (it wasn't) I'd be expecting a potentially hostile reaction to my comment, which is one of the main reasons so few people comment at all any more.
12/27/2022 08:51:47 PM · #16
Originally posted by mikeee:

Hating sounding like a precious, needy photographer, but I just got a 3. How bad does a photo need to be to get a 3?

It would be really useful if anybody who gives a 3 or below also gives a comment about what the photo is lacking. It should be a condition of giving a low score that a meaningful comment is given at the same time.


It's really hard - especially with so few votes. But people use different criteria. The good thing is -- shots that are similar to yours, the ones that are your closest competitors, were probably receiving the same votes. It does work out in the wash.

E.g., if you have a gorgeous, perfectly composed shot, but were voted down because someone didn't find it unique and artistic, then the other gorgeous perfectly composed shots were voted down as well. The ones that will benefit from that voter are the shots that are gorgeous and unique which deserve to rise more.

I say this because I'm usually in the first category, but rarely hit the unique and artistic mark. So it really is good that we have people that vote with different criteria. Even though it hurts a lot, sometimes.
12/28/2022 11:16:55 AM · #17
Originally posted by mikeee:

Hating sounding like a precious, needy photographer, but I just got a 3. How bad does a photo need to be to get a 3?


If their voting scale is 1-4, that's a good image.

You don't really know. And as others have pointed out, if they voted yours a 3, chances are others got similar scores.

Or it could be that your image brought up a horrid memory that only that viewer knows.

It's one vote, don't let it rent too much space in your head.

Originally posted by mikeee:

It would be really useful if anybody who gives a 3 or below also gives a comment about what the photo is lacking. It should be a condition of giving a low score that a meaningful comment is given at the same time.


Yah, that's prolly the number one complaint here in the forums at DPC.

Brutal facts? If that's how they genuinely feel, too bad!

You will lose your mind if you try and figure out the vagaries of the voters.

I have two blue ribbons that make no sense. One was a joke......It wasn't a bad pic at all, but I figured it would tank because of the tongue-in-cheek presentation.

The other one IMNSHO is just a truly "Meh...." image.

You just never know. I do think that it would scare off some voters if they had to "justify" their low vote.

Years ago, we had one member who used a low scale and talked about it openly as to why and how. He was dead on consistent.

It made sense, and because of who it was in the community, the village burning was kept to the outbuildings alone, but *nobody* was happy about it.

It's funny how sometimes it gets to you. After over 16 years and 800 challenges and having become very comfortable with my own strengths and weaknesses, it *STILL* pisses me off when I get a stupid score when I thought I had a good image. What compounds that is when I have an image or series that sells well in the gallery yet gets a lukewarm reception here.

Keeps one humble......
12/28/2022 04:30:11 PM · #18
Posts like this one are the reason I rarely comment.

I personally prefer someone tell me what they like/don't like about my image and what (in their opinion) would be an improvement. I may agree or disagree, but it I can try it out (or not). Telling me you were moved by my image is also helpful.

Since I don't know who took each entry and/or what type of comment is preferred, it's just not worth it to upset someone with my opinion.
12/28/2022 05:52:43 PM · #19
Originally posted by Elaine:

... it's just not worth it to upset someone with my opinion.

And THAT is truly a major bummer! It's a shame when a photographer of your caliber has something to say and doesn't from fear of hurting someone's feelings.

People need to put on their grownup britches and roll with it. IMO, if you can't stand the criticism you shouldn't be entering a photo in a photo contest. People can expect a few "attaboys" in here, but shouldn't come to expect it on everything. Share with FB friends if you only want fluffy, feel-good feedback.
12/28/2022 07:18:32 PM · #20
Originally posted by glad2badad:

Originally posted by Elaine:

... it's just not worth it to upset someone with my opinion.

And THAT is truly a major bummer! It's a shame when a photographer of your caliber has something to say and doesn't from fear of hurting someone's feelings.

People need to put on their grownup britches and roll with it. IMO, if you can't stand the criticism you shouldn't be entering a photo in a photo contest. People can expect a few "attaboys" in here, but shouldn't come to expect it on everything. Share with FB friends if you only want fluffy, feel-good feedback.

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I was listening to one of those year-end "books to read" programs and was struck when one of the reviewers told a listener "... and if you don't like it, put it down -- it's not your job to worry about the author's feelings."

If you make a comment and someone replies inappropriately just report it via the ticketing system and it will become their problem, not yours.
12/28/2022 10:00:08 PM · #21
Originally posted by Elaine:

... it's just not worth it to upset someone with my opinion.


Originally posted by glad2badad:

And THAT is truly a major bummer! It's a shame when a photographer of your caliber has something to say and doesn't from fear of hurting someone's feelings.


That should be qualified further.....it's a shame that *any* photographer has something to say and doesn't from fear of hurting someone's feelings.

Originally posted by glad2badad:

<snip> IMO, if you can't stand the criticism you shouldn't be entering a photo in a photo contest.


It seems to me that more people would gripe less about a low vote if they got a comment that indicated where the image fell down for that viewer.

Originally posted by glad2badad:

Share with FB friends if you only want fluffy, feel-good feedback.


Between the fact that virtually nobody ever leaves legit CC on FB, and it's dead easy to just throw up any image any time, this directed working site requires more effort than the instant gratification folks want to commit.
12/29/2022 01:15:01 AM · #22
Originally posted by NikonJeb:



It seems to me that more people would gripe less about a low vote if they got a comment that indicated where the image fell down for that viewer.



Absolutely - that is how *I* feel. We just had a funny episode a few challenges back, where I made a comment and someone else (sorry can't remember who), made almost the exact opposite comment .... that's art. You can't please everyone :-D.

When I comment I try to give the photographer *my* POV. I would love for more people commenting on my images so I can learn and understand what an "outsider" sees.

I compete in freestyle with my dogs, and last year I had, what I thought was a *stunning* routine. A judge, who, to say the truth, doesn't really like my routines generally, made a critical (negative) comment. I brushed it off, but deep down it "nagged" me. I then saw a video of the routine that someone posted on FB (I performed at a public place, so all good), and I suddenly *saw* what that judge had seen ....
12/29/2022 10:15:47 AM · #23
Originally posted by glad2badad:

...fear of hurting someone's feelings.

People need to put on their grownup britches and roll with it. IMO, if you can't stand the criticism you shouldn't be entering a photo in a photo contest. People can expect a few "attaboys" in here, but shouldn't come to expect it on everything. Share with FB friends if you only want fluffy, feel-good feedback.


No fear of hurting someone's feelings, I just don't want to be yelled at for doing it.

12/29/2022 10:18:30 AM · #24
Originally posted by NikonJeb:



Originally posted by glad2badad:

Share with FB friends if you only want fluffy, feel-good feedback.


Between the fact that virtually nobody ever leaves legit CC on FB, and it's dead easy to just throw up any image any time, this directed working site requires more effort than the instant gratification folks want to commit.


And yet, Jeb, you started this thread by telling us the kind of feedback you want.
12/29/2022 11:24:48 AM · #25
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/1000-1999/1626/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1032230.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/1000-1999/1626/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1032230.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

haha! oops -- didn't mean to post that. I just needed to know the photo information on 1032230, so I didn't know of any other way than to open a thread and preview the results. I hit post instead of preview.

But now I'll leave it for your enjoyment. :)


Message edited by author 2022-12-29 11:26:05.
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