DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Bear said I had to...
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 25 of 25, (reverse)
AuthorThread
12/23/2022 03:35:00 PM · #1
Bear said I had to tell you this... or... he would! Ha!

So... I'm gonna tell you, although I don't see anything odd about it. It's just LIFE in Lydiaville. *rolleyes*

He left a comment on my entry in "Strange or Imaginary Edibles" challenge.

"Lydia, how COULD you????? (And I don't mean "eat the dog", I mean "make a sandwich with white bread")"

I replied (yes, during voting... sorry! He obviously recognized me. I mean... I was RIGHT THERE! Ha!):


"Hahahaha!

Hubby and I rarely eat any bread at all. And... never "evil white bread monsters" which is what we've always said white bread has. Ha!

In fact, I went to the store just to get a loaf of bread. Knowing that we wouldn't eat it, I explained to the cashier (who had told me about a crusty mole she has on her left side. whaaa...??!) and said I'd like to buy it, but only take two pieces out. Would someone else eat it?

She said yes, so that's what I did.

And... it really wasn't even white. This loaf more photogenic crust. :D I whitened it in post. :D

Thanks for your comment, Bear!"


He replied:

"So let me get this straight: you went to the store, selected a photogenic loaf, paid for it, opened the package, removed two slices, closed the package back up and TIPPED THE CASHIER with a slightly-used loaf of bread?

Only in Lydia-land could this happen. Either you post this story up (including an explanation of the crusty mole/crusty bread solipsism or *I* will in a public thread. It's too good to die."

LOL!

In reality, it was worse than that. She also pulled up her bangs and showed me two spots on her forehead that she'd asked a dermatologist about. I said, "age spots?". She said, "Yep! Age spots."

All I wanted was two slices of bread. Not her medical history.

But... that's what you get here in TinyTown, GA. :D

I wouldn't have it any other way.

12/23/2022 03:43:33 PM · #2
The next time someone asks me ‘what’s the difference between you Brits and the Americans?’ I’m gonna show them this thread I think and just say ‘white bread apparently’ as I have no idea what’s going on :.)
12/23/2022 03:53:16 PM · #3
Clearly you shop at the wrong store ...

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_895857.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_895857.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
12/23/2022 04:44:46 PM · #4
Originally posted by Rankles:

The next time someone asks me ‘what’s the difference between you Brits and the Americans?’ I’m gonna show them this thread I think and just say ‘white bread apparently’ as I have no idea what’s going on :.)

Classic American white bread, of which "Wonder Bread" is the most storied example, is the blandest, softest bread imaginable. There's so much air and so little substance that you can grab an unopened loaf in its package, squeeze it like an accordion, and easily compress it to the thickness of a paperback book. Those of us who grew up urban in the 40's and 50's got a LOT of wonder Bread in our school lunches. I didn't even KNOW what real bread was like until we moved to Switzerland in 1958 :-)

Originally posted by wiki:

The company sponsored Howdy Doody with host Buffalo Bob Smith telling the audience, "Wonder Bread builds strong bodies 8 ways" referring to the number of added nutrients.[13] By the 1960s, Wonder Bread was advertised with the slogan "Helps build strong bodies 12 ways," with a list of health claims.[13] In 1986, Continental introduced the lower-calorie Wonder Light bread.
12/23/2022 05:02:12 PM · #5
It's pillow bread!
12/23/2022 05:17:19 PM · #6
Originally posted by Bear_Music:


Classic American white bread, of which "Wonder Bread" is the most storied example...


At least it's named appropriately... it *is* a wonder anyone will eat it!

While we're telling bread stories, I visited myself upon Robert and Penelope in 2021 on a motorcycle trip to the east coast. The bread that they use is really fabulous. I actually wound up taking the end of a loaf back with me, LOL!

Here in WI, we have a great little bakery called Angelic Bakehouse, and their sprouted whole grain bread is what we use every day. If you can get it where you live try it.
12/23/2022 05:39:10 PM · #7
To nourish more than the body I recommend "The Tassajara Bread Book" -- making bread is not hard ...

Growing up we called the Wonder-type product "balloon bread" ...
12/23/2022 06:40:26 PM · #8
My mother made bread. I envied my classmates' wonder bread sandwiches. Helping to set the tables at summer camp, I and a cohort used to steal slices to squeeze into little pills.

Now the Incumbent Other makes bread. It's strange: even the upmarket breads at our local supermarket taste a little off, and my first and last experience at a much touted bakery, proved to be a very expensive disappointment.

I still have one of the two huge ceramic bowls my mother used.

I'm spoiled for sure.

(tiny edit)

Message edited by author 2022-12-23 19:36:41.
12/23/2022 06:46:30 PM · #9
Originally posted by tnun:

... slices to squeeze into a little into little pills.

The white part of a slice of Wonder bread can be compressed to the size of a Valium. Coincidence? ;-)
12/23/2022 06:53:57 PM · #10
Mexico had its own version of "Wonder Bread", called Bimbo.

'Nuff said.
12/23/2022 08:39:55 PM · #11
Originally posted by tanguera:

Mexico had its own version of "Wonder Bread", called Bimbo.

Judging from the advertising on the delivery trucks the Bimbo brand is currently available in northern California.
12/23/2022 11:00:31 PM · #12
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by tanguera:

Mexico had its own version of "Wonder Bread", called Bimbo.

Judging from the advertising on the delivery trucks the Bimbo brand is currently available in northern California.


...and in the Midwest. they've been in Chicago for decades, but I see their trucks in Milwaukee occasionally too.
12/24/2022 05:15:05 AM · #13
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by Rankles:

The next time someone asks me ‘what’s the difference between you Brits and the Americans?’ I’m gonna show them this thread I think and just say ‘white bread apparently’ as I have no idea what’s going on :.)

Classic American white bread, of which "Wonder Bread" is the most storied example, is the blandest, softest bread imaginable. There's so much air and so little substance that you can grab an unopened loaf in its package, squeeze it like an accordion, and easily compress it to the thickness of a paperback book. Those of us who grew up urban in the 40's and 50's got a LOT of wonder Bread in our school lunches. I didn't even KNOW what real bread was like until we moved to Switzerland in 1958 :-)

Originally posted by wiki:

The company sponsored Howdy Doody with host Buffalo Bob Smith telling the audience, "Wonder Bread builds strong bodies 8 ways" referring to the number of added nutrients.[13] By the 1960s, Wonder Bread was advertised with the slogan "Helps build strong bodies 12 ways," with a list of health claims.[13] In 1986, Continental introduced the lower-calorie Wonder Light bread.


I never used to think of British store-bought bread being up to much but I was shocked after moving to Italy. Here you generally still go to the baker for fresh bread, and the sliced loaves they sell in the supermarkets are pretty bland but I was most surprised at their expiry date - up to 3 or 4 months on some of them!

The English stuff at least got delivered daily and you had about 3-5 days before it went stale, more than fresh bread maybe but the idea of months old 'still fresh' bread weirds me out a bit.

This wonder-bread then, which camp does it fall under?
12/24/2022 09:34:25 AM · #14
Originally posted by Rankles:

This wonder-bread then, which camp does it fall under?

You could bury it in a time capsule and it'd still be edible when you exhumed it: THAT camp :-)
12/24/2022 01:06:57 PM · #15
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by Rankles:

This wonder-bread then, which camp does it fall under?

You could bury it in a time capsule and it'd still be edible when you exhumed it: THAT camp :-)


hahahaha!
12/24/2022 01:43:09 PM · #16
Originally posted by tanguera:

Mexico had its own version of "Wonder Bread", called Bimbo.

'Nuff said.


There's a Bimbo bakery on Aviation. :-)
12/24/2022 01:47:47 PM · #17
Originally posted by tnun:

... My mother made bread.....
I still have one of the two huge ceramic bowls my mother used.

Thank you for this memory. My mother also made bread, and each of us three daughters had a special bread (or scone in one instance) we "helped" make during major bread making sessions. Mine was a malted date loaf. Certainly influenced by this and while I still lived in England, in my early 20's I purchased two wonderful ceramic mixing bowls, made in France, and they have accompanied me on many moves in the 50+ years since, including being transported to Canada, and subsequently to the USA.
12/24/2022 01:56:47 PM · #18
Originally posted by PenelopeK:

... each of us three daughters had a special bread (or scone in one instance) we "helped" make during major bread making sessions. Mine was a malted date loaf.

I hope you post this for our next "recipe" challenge ... :-)
12/26/2022 10:26:11 PM · #19
Originally posted by Melethia:

Originally posted by tanguera:

Mexico had its own version of "Wonder Bread", called Bimbo.

'Nuff said.


There's a Bimbo bakery on Aviation. :-)

At the local Costco ... ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275220.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275220.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
12/26/2022 10:55:49 PM · #20
Originally posted by tnun:

... My mother made bread.....

I still have one of the two huge ceramic bowls my mother used.


Originally posted by PenelopeK:

Thank you for this memory. My mother also made bread, and each of us three daughters had a special bread (or scone in one instance) we "helped" make during major bread making sessions. Mine was a malted date loaf. Certainly influenced by this and while I still lived in England, in my early 20's I purchased two wonderful ceramic mixing bowls, made in France, and they have accompanied me on many moves in the 50+ years since, including being transported to Canada, and subsequently to the USA.


We make bread and when we do we use these "Bread Domes". They have a raw lid. Mostly we use them to bake whole chickens in. It browns them in a lovely manner whilst keeping them moist and delicious.

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/60000-64999/63398/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275221.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/60000-64999/63398/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275221.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

They fill the house with the most delicious aroma. Vivi uses garlic & rosemary in the oil. The one at the top of the image is the first one I got a number of years ago.

That lovely tracking unfortunately is cracking. I can't use that one for chicken any more 'cause it leaks.

I sent an email and asked the company what I was doing wrong that caused the cracking and told them my process.

They said I did nothing wrong and that they'd had a couple folks report that they had experienced the issue.

They sent me a new one, no charge. We're ceramicists here at Vivi on Verbeke.

Ceramic stuff just doesn't last forever. It's a use item. That bread dome was no less than a decade old.

And they asked me if I'd like a free replacement! Uh, yeah! It's gorgeous.

And I can still make bread in the cracked one.
12/27/2022 09:08:20 AM · #21
We have old ceramic crocks for bread dough that work well for the purpose and also give a satisfying feeling of continuity across generations. A few years ago, we splurged on a proofing box (folding aluminum box with thermostatically controlled heater) that provides a lot more consistency in rising times (better temperatures during the winter and protection from drafts). That was a very worthwhile investment, easy to recommend to frequent bread bakers.

Last year, we got our own grain mill and a supply of hard winter wheat berries to grind.Always wanted to do that ever since Whole Earth Catalog days in the 1970's.
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/80000-84999/81362/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275227.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/80000-84999/81362/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275227.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
The wheat berries last decades (if not centuries) if kept dry. The fresh ground flour comes out slightly warm and smells wonderful even before the oven gets involved. Supposedly there are nutritional advantages compared to whole wheat flour from the store (which are debatable), and it leads to a glib sense of being extra virtuous (which is quite unjustified). Not sure it was worth the expense, but it is fun to try out different varieties of wheat berries.

There are times when it would be better to sift out some of the bran to use separately, without going all the way down to Wonder bread style. The upcoming year will bring experimentation with sifters of different mesh sizes to see what works best.

Not sure I could convince myself to buy balloon bread, even as a prop.
01/02/2023 11:46:31 AM · #22
So.....you know how you take people at face value 'cause you know 'em and have no reason to believe they're yanking your chain?

Bimbo bread.

Riiiiiiight!

So I'm on my way to work this morning........

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/60000-64999/63398/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275365.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/60000-64999/63398/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275365.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Now the people speaking of this mystical substance live out where as we call it on the East Coast, "The Land of Fruits & Nuts".

So there's a natural suspicion.....

I live in Pennsylvania, more than 3000 miles away.

I noticed the plate on this thing is a Pennsylvania tag, and the tractor belongs to a local trucking company, so I can't write this off as a hallucination.

Damn thing is officially here. I'm here to tell you that despite all my hesitancy, Bimbo Bread *does* exist! LOL!

Truth is stranger than fiction.
01/02/2023 03:21:21 PM · #23
Told ya!

Originally posted by NikonJeb:

So.....you know how you take people at face value 'cause you know 'em and have no reason to believe they're yanking your chain?

Bimbo bread.

Riiiiiiight!

So I'm on my way to work this morning........

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/60000-64999/63398/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275365.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/60000-64999/63398/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1275365.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Now the people speaking of this mystical substance live out where as we call it on the East Coast, "The Land of Fruits & Nuts".

So there's a natural suspicion.....

I live in Pennsylvania, more than 3000 miles away.

I noticed the plate on this thing is a Pennsylvania tag, and the tractor belongs to a local trucking company, so I can't write this off as a hallucination.

Damn thing is officially here. I'm here to tell you that despite all my hesitancy, Bimbo Bread *does* exist! LOL!

Truth is stranger than fiction.
01/02/2023 03:37:10 PM · #24
According to Wiki:

"Bimbo is slang for a conventionally attractive, sexualized, naive, and unintelligent woman. ... The term was originally used in the United States as early as 1919 ..."

Again according to Wiki:

Grupo Bimbo, S.A.B. de C.V. (also known simply as Bimbo) is a Mexican multinational company with a presence in over 33 countries located in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa. It has an annual sales volume of 15 billion dollars and is currently listed on the Mexican stock exchange with the ticker BIMBO.

Grupo Bimbo has 134,000 employees, 196 bakery plants, 3 million points of sale, and a distribution network with 57 thousand routes all over the world. The company has more than 100 brands and 13 thousand products, like Bimbo, Tía Rosa, Entenmann's, Pullman, Rainbo, Nutrella, Marinela, Oroweat, Sara Lee, Thomas', Arnold and Barcel. Its strategic associations include Alicorp (Peru); Blue Label (Mexico); Fincomún, Galletas la Moderna, Grupo Nutresa (Colombia); Mundo Dulce (Argentina); among others.

Message edited by author 2023-01-02 15:47:36.
01/03/2023 12:04:47 PM · #25
He's right. That's special. :)

LOL. I love it! :)
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 03/30/2023 06:52:29 AM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2023 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Current Server Time: 03/30/2023 06:52:29 AM EDT.