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DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Panning
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07/11/2020 07:52:46 AM · #1
"I did have this one: ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/100000-104999/103142/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1251886.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/100000-104999/103142/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1251886.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' + 1) . ', but after someone got DQd for cloning out dirt on the lens instead of dirt on the sensor, I didn't know if I could edit out the muck that was bothering me. It definitely was dirt that was inside the camera. I took the lens off and used a rocket blower and that fixed it. But sometimes the stuff inside is a fuzzy blob. And sometimes it's a black blob. So I figured just use another shot." Vawendy

That was me that got DQ'd. You were smart to not try it!

I took this picture back in 2004 with an Olympus E 20P. Not bad for a camera with 5 megs of resolution. I chased geese around a golf course in a golf cart to get this one! I was traveling in the same direction at almost the same speed as the goose. Luckily no water in front of me as I was not looking where I was going!!

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/202/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_66676.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/202/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_66676.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Message edited by author 2020-07-11 08:17:22.
07/10/2020 10:44:38 PM · #2
Originally posted by vawendy:

But if you're zoomed in all the way so that you're taking up most of the screen oh, you just don't have the depth of field, and you must follow the bird

I totally agree, though I can't say I've been particularly successful at it -- maybe a couple of my seagull shots come close ...
07/10/2020 10:33:16 PM · #3
Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by vawendy:

Simply put -- when you're photographing a moving bird, it's almost impossible to photograph unless you're panning. You don't know what the exact position of the bird will be when it crosses in front of your camera, and it's moving to fast to hold the camera still and press the shutter and get a perfect focus.

I was shooting the bridge through a hole in a sculpture when the bird flew by ...
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_189131.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_189131.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

And, pre-focusing on a spot and waiting for the subject is a standard technique for photographing hummingbirds and athletics ...


When the bird is far away, that works. Or if you are baiting the bird, so you know where it's going.

But if you're zoomed in all the way so that you're taking up most of the screen oh, you just don't have the depth of field, and you must follow the bird


You shared a lovely shot with us Wendy, and thanks for that, but there is quite a difference, in intent and result, between panning to keep something in the field of view for the shot, but then taking the actual shot with a very short exposure time, versus actually "swivel[ing] the camera during the exposure", and the latter phrase was part of the description for the challenge.
07/10/2020 07:53:50 PM · #4
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by vawendy:

Simply put -- when you're photographing a moving bird, it's almost impossible to photograph unless you're panning. You don't know what the exact position of the bird will be when it crosses in front of your camera, and it's moving to fast to hold the camera still and press the shutter and get a perfect focus.

I was shooting the bridge through a hole in a sculpture when the bird flew by ...
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_189131.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_189131.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

And, pre-focusing on a spot and waiting for the subject is a standard technique for photographing hummingbirds and athletics ...


When the bird is far away, that works. Or if you are baiting the bird, so you know where it's going.

But if you're zoomed in all the way so that you're taking up most of the screen oh, you just don't have the depth of field, and you must follow the bird
07/10/2020 06:34:25 PM · #5
Originally posted by vawendy:

Simply put -- when you're photographing a moving bird, it's almost impossible to photograph unless you're panning. You don't know what the exact position of the bird will be when it crosses in front of your camera, and it's moving to fast to hold the camera still and press the shutter and get a perfect focus.

I was shooting the bridge through a hole in a sculpture when the bird flew by ...
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_189131.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_189131.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

And, pre-focusing on a spot and waiting for the subject is a standard technique for photographing hummingbirds and athletics ...
07/10/2020 06:06:59 PM · #6
Originally posted by pgirish007:

yup, agreed and that is why I told you that your image is not just horizontal move but an interesting shot!

I looked back to the motion panning description and there in the latest one it says "In still photography, motion panning is a technique used mostly to freeze a moving object whilst allowing motion blur in the (stationary) background. The desired result is usually a well-depicted, sharp subject in an almost impressionistic sea of blurred lines and colors" and that is different then what we had in this challenge.

I think I am thinking too much :D

Originally posted by glad2badad:

I noticed that part of the description as well, but I think a person could hand-hold a camera and get a panning effect, if they're steady. Similar in nature to a panning tripod head. Loosen the horizontal direction and the camera "swivels" on the tripod. On my entry I tried to remain stationary and swivel with the subject - it wasn't perfect. It's much harder to do with slower moving subjects. Originally I had this idea to pan either tubers or kayaks on the river by us. They were moving WAY too slow to get a good / steady effect. At ISO 50, F22, I was still not getting much motion in the image (at the river). My FS entry was taken during our trip to the river front.


I would have liked to have had that definition for this one. I looked in different places, which simply said that panning is moving with the object.

They didn't specify that the background HAD to be blurred. I understand the idea of panning with slow shutter speeds, but I particularly looked at the description, and it didn't specific slow shutter speeds.

But I did wonder if that's what people would be looking for.

Simply put -- when you're photographing a moving bird, it's almost impossible to photograph unless you're panning. You don't know what the exact position of the bird will be when it crosses in front of your camera, and it's moving to fast to hold the camera still and press the shutter and get a perfect focus.

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/3000-3999/3059/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1251593.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/3000-3999/3059/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1251593.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

Especially when you're zoomed in all the way on the bird, it's extremely difficult to get the shot unless you're moving the camera.

I did have this one: ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/100000-104999/103142/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1251886.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/100000-104999/103142/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1251886.jpg', '/') + 1) . ', but after someone got DQd for cloning out dirt on the lens instead of dirt on the sensor, I didn't know if I could edit out the muck that was bothering me. It definitely was dirt that was inside the camera. I took the lens off and used a rocket blower and that fixed it. But sometimes the stuff inside is a fuzzy blob. And sometimes it's a black blob. So I figured just use another shot.

Oh well!

07/10/2020 05:53:23 PM · #7
Nope. Not thinking too much. Interesting sidebar!
07/10/2020 05:47:32 PM · #8
yup, agreed and that is why I told you that your image is not just horizontal move but an interesting shot!

I looked back to the motion panning description and there in the latest one it says "In still photography, motion panning is a technique used mostly to freeze a moving object whilst allowing motion blur in the (stationary) background. The desired result is usually a well-depicted, sharp subject in an almost impressionistic sea of blurred lines and colors" and that is different then what we had in this challenge.

I think I am thinking too much :D

Originally posted by glad2badad:

I noticed that part of the description as well, but I think a person could hand-hold a camera and get a panning effect, if they're steady. Similar in nature to a panning tripod head. Loosen the horizontal direction and the camera "swivels" on the tripod. On my entry I tried to remain stationary and swivel with the subject - it wasn't perfect. It's much harder to do with slower moving subjects. Originally I had this idea to pan either tubers or kayaks on the river by us. They were moving WAY too slow to get a good / steady effect. At ISO 50, F22, I was still not getting much motion in the image (at the river). My FS entry was taken during our trip to the river front.
07/10/2020 05:37:39 PM · #9
I noticed that part of the description as well, but I think a person could hand-hold a camera and get a panning effect, if they're steady. Similar in nature to a panning tripod head. Loosen the horizontal direction and the camera "swivels" on the tripod. On my entry I tried to remain stationary and swivel with the subject - it wasn't perfect. It's much harder to do with slower moving subjects. Originally I had this idea to pan either tubers or kayaks on the river by us. They were moving WAY too slow to get a good / steady effect. At ISO 50, F22, I was still not getting much motion in the image (at the river). My FS entry was taken during our trip to the river front.
07/10/2020 05:06:57 PM · #10
Thank you Gina! and I think that is where my debate was that horizontal panning is what everyone knows and have executed it very well and in this case there are some specific words in the description and that made me go with that route even though I had some nice ( that is what I think :D) image of horizontal motion.

Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

It wasn't what I think of as panning, but I liked the photo and gave you a good score anyway.
07/10/2020 05:02:55 PM · #11
It wasn't what I think of as panning, but I liked the photo and gave you a good score anyway.
07/10/2020 04:51:54 PM · #12
I still need to learn a lot in the crazy ocean of Photography :)

Some of you I had put down comment saying there is debate between Panning and motion Panning. About that debate, it with my own and not really any thread on DPC. see what happened was that in the challenge it says "Panning the camera" where as the all other times there were reference of motion panning as there are 5 challenges already. Also in this particular challenge it was description as "Swivel the camera during the exposure from a fixed position:" so to me meaning keep camera at fixed position and take the shot and that is where i tried 360 kind of approach. I like those images and I did mention that they are ribbon worthy but that makes me thinking on what exactly this challenge was.

In this particular challenge the description actually tricked me to think whether the "fixed position" in reference is with respect to camera or the person who is taking shot.

Just wanted to clarify on my comment :)
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