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12/30/2019 02:38:54 PM · #1
This article from Light Stalking is quite good. And it just so happens to lay out very well the case for our continued use of the Minimal Editing ruleset :-)

The 1% Rule Applied to Photography
12/30/2019 03:29:12 PM · #2
Good thoughts on the topic. Stepping away from the editing for a bit often does make a difference.
12/30/2019 08:02:46 PM · #3
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

This article from Light Stalking is quite good. And it just so happens to lay out very well the case for our continued use of the Minimal Editing ruleset :-)

The 1% Rule Applied to Photography

Where's the "Like" button? :-)
12/30/2019 08:43:33 PM · #4
Good read!
I found myself agreeing with quite a lot of it. Certainly the overarching idea that a number of small improvements can, taken together, make a really substantial difference is beyond dispute.

FWIW, not sure I interpret it as supporting Minimal.

Originally posted by Lightstalking.com:


Of course, you will still need post-production to get the very best out of your image...


Not to say that Minimal doesn't have its place, it just isn't about getting the most from your images. Especially since it requires shooting JPEG.
12/30/2019 09:18:13 PM · #5
Originally posted by glad2badad:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

This article from Light Stalking is quite good. And it just so happens to lay out very well the case for our continued use of the Minimal Editing ruleset :-)

The 1% Rule Applied to Photography

Where's the "Like" button? :-)

You can borrow this alternate if you like ...

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1179866.png', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_1179866.png', '/') + 1) . '
12/30/2019 10:28:00 PM · #6
I see the minimal editing challenges as the article suggests as a valuable learning tool and yes it takes practice to be good at getting a good shot right out of the camera. I can say that I personally have not taken a picture that I thought was good or even excellent that I did not feel I could not improve in post processing. So if you are a purist than minimal editing is for you, but if you want the best final result than I think the photographer should have every technological tool available to them to create their vision. That is not to say I do not enjoy the minimal challenges only that I feel they are constraining for a purpose.
12/30/2019 10:43:54 PM · #7
Originally posted by GolferDDS:

<snip>if you want the best final result than I think the photographer should have every technological tool available to them to create their vision.<snip>

For me it's quite simple. What I see in my mind's eye as I envision the final image doesn't care about anything. I *need* to be able to make edits in order to achieve what my mind wants in an image.
12/31/2019 12:35:34 AM · #8
Originally posted by GolferDDS:

........., but if you want the best final result than I think the photographer should have every technological tool available to them to create their vision....


Iím not a fisherman but I imagine to get the best final result of that past-time one could use a variety of tools that people who do it for the pure joy do not use. Surely there is a sense of achievement in reaching a good result with a minimum of technology, well for me anyway.
12/31/2019 12:43:38 AM · #9
Originally posted by NikonJeb:

Originally posted by GolferDDS:

<snip>if you want the best final result than I think the photographer should have every technological tool available to them to create their vision.<snip>

For me it's quite simple. What I see in my mind's eye as I envision the final image doesn't care about anything. I *need* to be able to make edits in order to achieve what my mind wants in an image.

Nothing, absolutely nothing, in that article suggests editing should not be a part of the workflow: it's just reinforcing the fact that a tiny improvement in each component of the workflow produces tangible overall improvement in the finished, edited project. And that's what Minimal is about; getting a properly-framed and properly-exposed image right out of the camera is a huge step towards achieving the best results in editing.

Believe me, I know. I've messed up PLENTY of images to the point that I can't get what I visualized out of them because I was in a hurry, being sloppy, not paying attention, whatever :-(
12/31/2019 01:37:51 AM · #10
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

This article from Light Stalking is quite good. And it just so happens to lay out very well the case for our continued use of the Minimal Editing ruleset :-)

The 1% Rule Applied to Photography

I am not sure, Bear, about your conclusion, he says:

"However, if you are shooting RAW, you can, in fact, go one or two percentage points beyond the limits of the histogram and recover the shadows or highlights."

"Of course, you will still need post-production to get the very best out of your image"

My takeaways:

1. Plan my shots more carefully, overcome the laziness and go out to shoot (spending too much time on my balcony ;)

2. Study photos of good photogs like those at 1x and improve my compositions, again I got lazy with too many similar shots

3. I sometimes underexpose photos, maybe should try also overexposing although this one is the least important advice these days - my takeaway is always shoot RAW so you have more possibilities with exposure in PP

So for me no more Minimal in the New Year as I am not going to spoil the potential of my shots by shooting in JPEG. Especially now that I have such fine set of lenses and cameras, I'd like to use them to the best of their capabilities.

PS I forgot to add that I need to completely refocus in 2020, enter less challenges with better images, even if the voters don't like them. I need to improve my photography and feel happier about the results :) Your link was very good in reminding me about that, thanks!

Message edited by author 2019-12-31 01:42:28.
12/31/2019 02:44:42 AM · #11
My photoclub has a wonderful annual event. We meet at a given locale and get given a shoot list of 12 images. Here is the trick - you only allowed 20 exposures to get the 12 images and you have to hand the SD card in when you are finished - no editing whatsoever (you tell them which of the 20 images you want to enter). It is an absolutely brilliant exercise for people like me who usually shoot a gazillion pictures and then choose and edit "the best".
Minimal at its best :-)
It's also fun to see how everyone "sees" the world differently and what interpretation of the themes people come up with. Clearly its a lot of work for the committee beforehand to scout for the venue and find interesting yet open challenges.
Well worth doing.
12/31/2019 12:07:14 PM · #12
Originally posted by kasaba:

...Here is the trick - you only allowed 20 exposures to get the 12 images and you have to hand the SD card in when you are finished - no editing whatsoever (you tell them which of the 20 images you want to enter).


How do they know that participants aren't chimping and deleting? ;-)
12/31/2019 01:29:38 PM · #13
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by kasaba:

...Here is the trick - you only allowed 20 exposures to get the 12 images and you have to hand the SD card in when you are finished - no editing whatsoever (you tell them which of the 20 images you want to enter).

How do they know that participants aren't chimping and deleting? ;-)

Image numbers out of sequence?
12/31/2019 04:15:47 PM · #14
Thanks for posting this. I was not aware of the 1% rule, but I am immediately a fan of it. I love the simplicity of it. There are so many areas of my life I could apply it.

I also like the idea of applying it to photography. When I feel uninspired and that my skills have plateaued, the idea of slowing down and working on making a 1% improvement in a few areas seems doable. As much as I may have not been a fan of Minimal challenges, I resolve to try to enter more this year. Instead of groaning when they come up, I will try to look at them as an opportunity to work on improving in this area by 1%.
12/31/2019 10:46:50 PM · #15
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by kasaba:

...Here is the trick - you only allowed 20 exposures to get the 12 images and you have to hand the SD card in when you are finished - no editing whatsoever (you tell them which of the 20 images you want to enter).


How do they know that participants aren't chimping and deleting? ;-)


Honor?
01/01/2020 03:05:11 PM · #16
Thanks for posting this. A reminder of the basics is always welcome. The intended audience for it seems to be people who think of their photography being judged by other photographers using an agreed-upon set of standards. It's more interesting & useful to me to know what it is I've set out to do with photography & then do it without compromise or apology.

I would love to see, am still hoping to someday see, a lively discussion in the forum here about what drives each of you to keep on doing photography. I would not be surprised if for some the motivating factor is the technology of the camera & lens, for example.

Anyway, Happy New Year to you all. I'm still here.
01/02/2020 11:40:15 AM · #17
Originally posted by GolferDDS:

<snip>if you want the best final result than I think the photographer should have every technological tool available to them to create their vision.<snip>

Originally posted by NikonJeb:

For me it's quite simple. What I see in my mind's eye as I envision the final image doesn't care about anything. I *need* to be able to make edits in order to achieve what my mind wants in an image.

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Nothing, absolutely nothing, in that article suggests editing should not be a part of the workflow: it's just reinforcing the fact that a tiny improvement in each component of the workflow produces tangible overall improvement in the finished, edited project.

Yeah, I know that. Part of what I was trying to say is that I have always felt to be different in that I've never really heard anyone else state it the way I did about what I "see" versus what is actual or real, or at least by conventional definition. I've always felt that I have various filters and lenses in my mind's eye that don't actually exist in what others see.
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

And that's what Minimal is about; getting a properly-framed and properly-exposed image right out of the camera is a huge step towards achieving the best results in editing.

Agreed. BUT..... One of the nice things about shooting in RAW, and having a baseline semi-auto walkaround setting is that it enables you to potentially get an image on the fly you might not ordinarily get. I realize that's not the point of the article, though, just happy about the technology.
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Believe me, I know. I've messed up PLENTY of images to the point that I can't get what I visualized out of them because I was in a hurry, being sloppy, not paying attention, whatever :-(

I made a typo on a FB post yesterday where I put up an image that I had played with too much in post. I stated that I had a weird result from edioting.

Edioting: The situation that results when you screw around with too much editing in an idiotic fashion.

I clain this typo as a word in my lexicon! LOL!!!
01/02/2020 12:54:51 PM · #18
Originally posted by NikonJeb:

Part of what I was trying to say is that I have always felt to be different in that I've never really heard anyone else state it the way I did about what I "see" versus what is actual or real, or at least by conventional definition. I've always felt that I have various filters and lenses in my mind's eye that don't actually exist in what others see.

I think Ansel Adams talked about this a lot ...
Originally posted by NikonJeb:


I made a typo on a FB post yesterday where I put up an image that I had played with too much in post. I stated that I had a weird result from edioting.

Edioting: The situation that results when you screw around with too much editing in an idiotic fashion.

I clain this typo as a word in my lexicon! LOL!!!

There's always a typo ...
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