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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Question for Bear/other Architectural photographer
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05/14/2019 12:38:40 PM · #1
s

(the s didn't fit on photographers. :)

I might have a real job! One that pays pretty well!

Anyway, a guy we know that sells and installs fireplaces wants to update his website and get better photos. So I may be going with him to different houses and be taking photos of fireplaces.

Tips? Tricks? ideas?

I'm looking through photos, and the ones I like have some of the room with them. Not just a front on photo of a fireplace.

What type of lens should I be using to get the best indoor shots? If I go too wide, the perspective is funky. I don't have a tilt shift.

I'd really like to do a good job for him. He's a friend and a really nice guy.

Thanks for your advice!
05/14/2019 01:00:01 PM · #2
Originally posted by vawendy:

If I go too wide, the perspective is funky.

Sometimes you can use a longer lens and stitch a few images together to get a bigger field of view with less distortion.
05/14/2019 01:41:38 PM · #3
There are various approaches to this, and other architectural 'togs may disagree with me, but some options:

1) get a tilt shift
2) get an ultrawide and crop out the distortion.
3) do what Paul says and do a panorama - shoot wider than you need and crop down
4) I bought an 11mm Irix which is practically distortionless. But it's slower
5) use a fisheye, correct the distortion, crop out the excess. This has worked pretty well.
05/14/2019 03:29:01 PM · #4
Originally posted by tanguera:

There are various approaches to this, and other architectural 'togs may disagree with me, but some options:

1) get a tilt shift

Maybe rent one to try out? Get the client to buy you one?
05/14/2019 03:43:00 PM · #5
Given that you are shooting APS-C, even the Canon 17 tilt/shift isn't going to be very wide (27.2mm equivalent). I think you would be better served with a wider prime. You really need something around 11mm or so to get where you want to go. The 11mm focal length would give you a coverage of about 91 degrees horizontally and 69 degrees vertically, for reference (or vice-versa in portrait). 14mm might be tolerable.
Distortion should not be a problem if you shoot level (so you don't need to correct perspective distortion). Any lens-specific distortion is normally correctable automatically in Lr (don't know about other software). You do not need a fast lens because you will want to be shooting at the smallest aperture you can that avoids softening from diffraction. For your purposes, that will probably be f/11. That will, of course, require a solid tripod and a remote release to avoid shake, as your exposures will be long if using natural or room light.
05/14/2019 05:39:06 PM · #6
thanks all!
05/14/2019 05:40:02 PM · #7
Originally posted by kirbic:

Given that you are shooting APS-C, even the Canon 17 tilt/shift isn't going to be very wide (27.2mm equivalent). I think you would be better served with a wider prime. You really need something around 11mm or so to get where you want to go. The 11mm focal length would give you a coverage of about 91 degrees horizontally and 69 degrees vertically, for reference (or vice-versa in portrait). 14mm might be tolerable.
Distortion should not be a problem if you shoot level (so you don't need to correct perspective distortion). Any lens-specific distortion is normally correctable automatically in Lr (don't know about other software). You do not need a fast lens because you will want to be shooting at the smallest aperture you can that avoids softening from diffraction. For your purposes, that will probably be f/11. That will, of course, require a solid tripod and a remote release to avoid shake, as your exposures will be long if using natural or room light.


Are you talking about 11 to 14 mm on a crop or on a full frame? I may be using a full frame, but the widest I'd have is a 16mm
05/14/2019 10:03:37 PM · #8
and if you're shooting inside, how do you even out the light? Just by time of day?
05/14/2019 10:45:21 PM · #9
Originally posted by vawendy:

and if you're shooting inside, how do you even out the light? Just by time of day?


You want to avoid high contrast situations - like a direct light beam from a window into an otherwise dark room. In that case, you need to do HDR and bracket.

05/14/2019 11:10:45 PM · #10
Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Given that you are shooting APS-C, even the Canon 17 tilt/shift isn't going to be very wide (27.2mm equivalent). I think you would be better served with a wider prime. You really need something around 11mm or so to get where you want to go. The 11mm focal length would give you a coverage of about 91 degrees horizontally and 69 degrees vertically, for reference (or vice-versa in portrait). 14mm might be tolerable.
Distortion should not be a problem if you shoot level (so you don't need to correct perspective distortion). Any lens-specific distortion is normally correctable automatically in Lr (don't know about other software). You do not need a fast lens because you will want to be shooting at the smallest aperture you can that avoids softening from diffraction. For your purposes, that will probably be f/11. That will, of course, require a solid tripod and a remote release to avoid shake, as your exposures will be long if using natural or room light.


Are you talking about 11 to 14 mm on a crop or on a full frame? I may be using a full frame, but the widest I'd have is a 16mm


If you are shooting FF, then 17mm may be wide enough; 14mm would be a benefit in some situations. You could use the Canon 17 tilt/shift, but unless you have experience with it, you may not get the results you want. A 14mm prime shot at f/8 will give focus from about 4 ft to infinity, so you don't need tilt. The only thing you give up by not having access to shift is that you will need to shoot level to avoid perspective distortion. That's where the wider lens is a benefit.
05/14/2019 11:20:24 PM · #11
Eric ' . substr('https://www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/31.gif', strrpos('https://www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/31.gif', '/') + 1) . ' ozerad and I shoot real estate photos for realtors and agents. A lot of the interior shots include fireplaces and if possible we prefer to show them lit or burning. If there's anything we can help you with please let me know. Real Estate Photography Team
05/15/2019 06:00:04 AM · #12
Use a tripod. Take a spirit level to square your camera up vertically and horizontally. Use the center column to adjust vertically, NOT the panhead. Shoot wider than you need to and crop out unwanted foreground. Often your best shot will be a horizontal image cropped out of a vertical image, if you have a superwide. ASSUME you will be processing HDR and bracket everything thoroughly: "film" is cheap, reshoots are not. Light the fireplaces where possible. Avoid shooting in rooms with direct light coming through windows to illuminate the room, choose a different time of day for that shot.

Paul's suggestion of doing tighter panos is a decent one but that's not a technique I'd want to see you attempt on a paying job if you are not experienced at it: It requires considerable precision in the setup and execution when it's used to shoot architectural interiors.
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