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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Question about proper monitor lighting and color.
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03/14/2019 07:00:14 AM · #1
I seem to be noticing more the difference between the appearance of pictures with respect to lighting and coloring between my computer, iPad, and Cellphone. I do not know which representation of the image is correct. I am aware of calibration software but haven't used it. Has anybody had experience with it? Is there any other way to accurately match the colors and brightness etc. between devices? I also find that the appearance of photos on the monitor is a lot different then when I print. I find that when I print that If I use Auto Tone and Auto Color on my iMac I get a more accurate and more appealing result on paper.
03/14/2019 07:22:35 PM · #2
OMG .. a constant source of angst with me .. i edit on my pc and get the colours right .. i often check on different devices .. and they ARE ALL DIFFERENT .. especially the red's ..
i use a Spyder3Pro to calibrate my monitor but still find that i'm not getting it right .. as in .. i had feedback on a pic i put in a challenge saying that it looked like the little girl's face looked like she'd had too much sun .. on my pc monitor it looked ok ..

i'm going to be checking back on this thread as i'm floundering re getting my monitor 'right' .. understanding that not everyone is going to be calibrating .. and there are going to be differences between ppl's monitors etc .. i often just go black and white so i dont have to worry about my colours ..
03/14/2019 07:48:21 PM · #3
I'm having the same problem. It's driving me crazy!!! Seriously!!!
03/14/2019 09:57:10 PM · #4
Some basic steps to take:
- Modern monitors are pretty good at being in reasonable calibration out of the box. Not to say you can't visibly improve them with hardware calibration, but software-only "calibration" is nearly useless. Set your monitor to factory settings that replicate sRGB space.
- Set your working space to sRGB in Ps
- Ensure that Ps is set to embed the profile information in the image metadata (tells other applications how to properly render the image)
- Ensure that your OS is set to use sRGB as the display profile (this is the Win 10 default)
- If you use Lr and you are exporting to JPEG and doing further editing, make sure that your exports are in sRGB (hint: it is not the default)
- Make sure that Ps is set to warn you when there is a profile mismatch, and convert to the working space (just in case you open a file that is not already in sRGB)

If you do the above, you should be close. It eliminates profile errors, ensures that you are using the profile that is most commonly used and is the default for internet browsers). While it is true that other color spaces like ProPhoto or Adobe RGB are larger color spaces, the errors that can and will occur when viewing non-sRGB images across computers and devices are a greater risk than the benefits. Only use these color spaces if you really know color management.
03/15/2019 06:48:34 AM · #5
Originally posted by kirbic:

Some basic steps to take:
- Modern monitors are pretty good at being in reasonable calibration out of the box. Not to say you can't visibly improve them with hardware calibration, but software-only "calibration" is nearly useless. Set your monitor to factory settings that replicate sRGB space.
- Set your working space to sRGB in Ps
- Ensure that Ps is set to embed the profile information in the image metadata (tells other applications how to properly render the image)
- Ensure that your OS is set to use sRGB as the display profile (this is the Win 10 default)
- If you use Lr and you are exporting to JPEG and doing further editing, make sure that your exports are in sRGB (hint: it is not the default)
- Make sure that Ps is set to warn you when there is a profile mismatch, and convert to the working space (just in case you open a file that is not already in sRGB)

If you do the above, you should be close. It eliminates profile errors, ensures that you are using the profile that is most commonly used and is the default for internet browsers). While it is true that other color spaces like ProPhoto or Adobe RGB are larger color spaces, the errors that can and will occur when viewing non-sRGB images across computers and devices are a greater risk than the benefits. Only use these color spaces if you really know color management.


Thanks Fritz. Will this also standardize the screen brightness?
03/15/2019 02:13:14 PM · #6
Originally posted by GolferDDS:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Some basic steps to take:
- Modern monitors are pretty good at being in reasonable calibration out of the box. Not to say you can't visibly improve them with hardware calibration, but software-only "calibration" is nearly useless. Set your monitor to factory settings that replicate sRGB space.
- Set your working space to sRGB in Ps
- Ensure that Ps is set to embed the profile information in the image metadata (tells other applications how to properly render the image)
- Ensure that your OS is set to use sRGB as the display profile (this is the Win 10 default)
- If you use Lr and you are exporting to JPEG and doing further editing, make sure that your exports are in sRGB (hint: it is not the default)
- Make sure that Ps is set to warn you when there is a profile mismatch, and convert to the working space (just in case you open a file that is not already in sRGB)

If you do the above, you should be close. It eliminates profile errors, ensures that you are using the profile that is most commonly used and is the default for internet browsers). While it is true that other color spaces like ProPhoto or Adobe RGB are larger color spaces, the errors that can and will occur when viewing non-sRGB images across computers and devices are a greater risk than the benefits. Only use these color spaces if you really know color management.


Thanks Fritz. Will this also standardize the screen brightness?


No, unfortunately not, and you ask a good and pertinent question because newer monitors are capable of pretty high brightness and usually need to be toned down. There are ways to set brightness without hardware calibration (using the visibility of dark transitions) but it is dicey.
05/03/2019 08:06:25 PM · #7
Originally posted by GolferDDS:

I seem to be noticing more the difference between the appearance of pictures with respect to lighting and coloring between my computer, iPad, and Cellphone. I do not know which representation of the image is correct. I am aware of calibration software but haven't used it. Has anybody had experience with it? Is there any other way to accurately match the colors and brightness etc. between devices? I also find that the appearance of photos on the monitor is a lot different then when I print. I find that when I print that If I use Auto Tone and Auto Color on my iMac I get a more accurate and more appealing result on paper.


The only accurate way to calibrate a monitor is with a hardware system like the X-Rite Display Pro or the new Spyder 5 Elite. Software alone will not do it. I have found that monitors right out of the box are set for internet use and gaming; bright with colors shifted to the blue. Plus, our eyes, as we age (ahem) just perceive color differently.

X-Rite Display PRo

Spyderco e Elite

It is really critical when you have a dual monitor system or a desktop and a laptop
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