DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> Diptych and Texture Q's
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 25 of 25, (reverse)
AuthorThread
09/15/2018 12:24:42 PM · #1
Two questions and not related (yet).

I'm guessing you can have a border around both images so it would seperate them? (I've been away a long time so humour me please).

If I use a texture in a challenge image does it have to cover the entire image or can I mask areas (talking about standard editing challenges)

Thanks in advance :)
09/15/2018 12:48:29 PM · #2
Yes, you may run a border to separate the images in a diptych. And you may mask the texture as well.
09/15/2018 01:04:38 PM · #3
Cool and thanks :)

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Yes, you may run a border to separate the images in a diptych. And you may mask the texture as well.
09/15/2018 01:11:09 PM · #4
Didn't we have a DQ on someone only using a texture on part of their image... only the sky or something?

Has the rule changed? Or am I mistaken?

09/15/2018 03:49:48 PM · #5
Many (many) moons ago I seem to remember issues with textures but have never used them so didn't pay (enough) attention. I'm wanting to try them now and wouldn't want to break any rules.

Originally posted by Lydia:

Didn't we have a DQ on someone only using a texture on part of their image... only the sky or something?

Has the rule changed? Or am I mistaken?
09/15/2018 05:24:03 PM · #6
Originally posted by Lydia:

Didn't we have a DQ on someone only using a texture on part of their image... only the sky or something?

Has the rule changed? Or am I mistaken?


The rule must have changed with The Big Rules Shakeup, because I remember that DQ.
09/16/2018 12:36:50 AM · #7
Originally posted by Lydia:

Didn't we have a DQ on someone only using a texture on part of their image... only the sky or something?

Has the rule changed? Or am I mistaken?

I *think* what you're referring to is that someone called a shot of clouds a "texture" and applied it only to the sky. ANY time a texture becomes the dominant visual component you are going to have a problem because we start treating it as a composite image. Textures, by their nature, need to be subordinate elements.
09/16/2018 10:36:33 PM · #8
Thank you, Bear.

I remember the details now.



Message edited by author 2018-09-16 22:41:30.
09/17/2018 07:43:42 PM · #9
can u use a prime lens and change the focus rather than zooming in this challenge..:)
as it's not technically changing the focal length ..
I googled it .. !! .. ;)
09/18/2018 08:58:18 AM · #10
I'd have thought not as it stipulates 2 different focal lengths in the rules (if it's not a DQ it may well be seen as a DNMC by the voters?. Maybe use 2 primes? or 2 cameras even?

Originally posted by roz:

can u use a prime lens and change the focus rather than zooming in this challenge..:)
as it's not technically changing the focal length ..
I googled it .. !! .. ;)
09/18/2018 10:48:38 AM · #11
Originally posted by Flagged Special Rule:

Your submitted image must comprise two shots of the same overall scene shot at different focal lengths. For this challenge, you MUST use two separate images and they MUST be presented as a diptych (side-by-side or one over the other). without any overlapping of the images.

As always, not following a flagged rule will get you disqualified.
09/18/2018 05:15:48 PM · #12
Where did the focal length diptych challenge come from? I'm really sorry if I missed critiquing it, if it was ever in the challenge suggestions thread (was it? please link to thread if it was, thanks). Can someone kindly tell me where its merit lies and why it's being run this way? Seems like an exclusionary challenge with a dq'able rule like this should have some point to it? Thanks.
09/18/2018 05:54:50 PM · #13
Originally posted by skewsme:

Can someone kindly tell me where its merit lies and why it's being run this way? Seems like an exclusionary challenge with a dq'able rule like this should have some point to it? Thanks.

It's a very interesting, purely technique-driven challenge, IMO anyway. It's akin to an exercise we'd use when teaching photography classes, actually. The idea is to get people to recognize the differences that come about by zooming in on a subject vs widening up in a couple of different ways. One thing you can do, obviously, is set up and shoot a scene, say a landscape, with a WA lens then swap in a telephoto and explore different ways of expressing the same scene by including/excluding more of it. This approach you could do by cropping of course, but you get better quality using the full sensor. The other approach, and potentially the more fruitful one IMO, is to shoot a scene from a considerable distance with a telephoto lens, then hike straight towards it until you are very close and can just frame it up with your WA lens. How does the mood change?

Are there emotional overtones riding on the differences between flat-field vs dimensional rendering? Is the scene MORE or LESS expressive of its essence when shot panoramically vs when abstracted to a few details?

And, of course, the same analytical exploration can be applied to, say, portrait shots or still life compositions. These are decisions the thoughtful photographer must make every time s/he sets out with camera in hand and a specific goal in mind. So it's about working on one small but vital set of techniques, the relationship of focal length to framing and compression vs expansion in the visualized image.

As to its provenance, it was proposed by 100393.gif Paul in an SC thread on challenge topics. (Yes, we have one of those too over in our little corner.)

Message edited by author 2018-09-18 17:57:17.
09/18/2018 10:28:06 PM · #14
Googled diptychs different focal lengths and came across this Link

Another interpretation might be to use Diptychs to tell a story. Some of these examples are really unique.

09/19/2018 05:51:32 PM · #15
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Yes, you may run a border to separate the images in a diptych. And you may mask the texture as well.


Does this mean you can have a border - plain - top, middle, and bottom in a vertical or both sides plus middle in a horizontal? Please advise quickly as time is getting away from us on this one :)
09/19/2018 08:02:55 PM · #16
Originally posted by nam:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Yes, you may run a border to separate the images in a diptych. And you may mask the texture as well.


Does this mean you can have a border - plain - top, middle, and bottom in a vertical or both sides plus middle in a horizontal? Please advise quickly as time is getting away from us on this one :)

Yes. :-)
09/19/2018 09:15:19 PM · #17
Don't agree because as written, challenge description allows submission of a 51mm and a 52mm pair, but not a diptych shot with a fixed lens camera. Below explanation might have been more impactful in the public thread beforehand.


Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by skewsme:

Can someone kindly tell me where its merit lies and why it's being run this way? Seems like an exclusionary challenge with a dq'able rule like this should have some point to it? Thanks.

It's a very interesting, purely technique-driven challenge, IMO anyway. It's akin to an exercise we'd use when teaching photography classes, actually. The idea is to get people to recognize the differences that come about by zooming in on a subject vs widening up in a couple of different ways. One thing you can do, obviously, is set up and shoot a scene, say a landscape, with a WA lens then swap in a telephoto and explore different ways of expressing the same scene by including/excluding more of it. This approach you could do by cropping of course, but you get better quality using the full sensor. The other approach, and potentially the more fruitful one IMO, is to shoot a scene from a considerable distance with a telephoto lens, then hike straight towards it until you are very close and can just frame it up with your WA lens. How does the mood change?

Are there emotional overtones riding on the differences between flat-field vs dimensional rendering? Is the scene MORE or LESS expressive of its essence when shot panoramically vs when abstracted to a few details?

And, of course, the same analytical exploration can be applied to, say, portrait shots or still life compositions. These are decisions the thoughtful photographer must make every time s/he sets out with camera in hand and a specific goal in mind. So it's about working on one small but vital set of techniques, the relationship of focal length to framing and compression vs expansion in the visualized image.

As to its provenance, it was proposed by 100393.gif Paul in an SC thread on challenge topics. (Yes, we have one of those too over in our little corner.)


Message edited by author 2018-09-20 05:08:25.
09/19/2018 09:34:39 PM · #18
I think it's a great exercise. I'm hoping I have time to shoot it tomorrow. I know I have a tendency to stick with a particular lens and pretty much the same focal length. I rarely dabble with wide angle at all. And thus I don't use it effectively.
09/19/2018 09:40:20 PM · #19
'Far and close' mighta done it. Or for you, wide angle only.
09/19/2018 09:44:43 PM · #20
I shot for it today. Fun.
09/19/2018 10:08:12 PM · #21
When I read the title of the challenge my mind went directly to Antonioni's film of the 60s "Blow up"

"Thomas (David Hemmings) is a London photographer who spends his time photographing fashion models. But one day he thinks he may have photographed something far more sinister: a murder. After taking pictures in the park, Thomas is horrified to find an ambiguous image lurking on the edge of the frame, which could be a shadow, but looks like a gun."

I thought that this challenge could produce good stuff, after all we found a whole bestiary in a sweet potato or a blade of grass....but unfortunately I did not have time to stroll to find something similarly interesting.
Nevertheless, why not participate in any challenges if possible, to use the verb "challenge" to its extent.
09/19/2018 11:16:11 PM · #22
Why not place all new challenge suggestions on the challenge suggestions thread so that there is an opportunity for input.

Message edited by author 2018-09-20 04:28:08.
09/20/2018 03:00:05 AM · #23
Originally posted by mariuca:

Nevertheless, why not participate in any challenges if possible, to use the verb "challenge" to its extent.


good photography needs lot of "free" time. Time to look around. Time to make your little neurons working, time to plan things. These DPC challenges are my relaxing moments in life :)
09/20/2018 02:56:04 PM · #24
Originally posted by skewsme:

Why not place all new challenge suggestions on the challenge suggestions thread so that there is an opportunity for input.

One reason is that it might give an unfair advantage to those who frequent the forums, especially when a challenge is posted shortly after the discussion thread has been active, as they have "advance notice" of the topic and have already considered ideas for it, as compared with those who are only confronted with the topic when the challenge is opened for submissions.

I don't schedule the challenges, but personally I'd prefer that no challenge be posted for entries while the topic's discussion thread is still on the front page to help even the playing field ...
09/21/2018 01:50:56 PM · #25
Fabulous photos in this challenge!!!
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 01/23/2019 11:40:18 AM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2019 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 01/23/2019 11:40:18 AM EST.