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DPChallenge Forums >> Current Challenge >> ever wake up in the morning...?
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09/14/2018 09:05:29 AM · #1
Ever wake up in the morning after rollover to find your entry mangled and bleeding? We all have, probably. You can blame the lack of taste and vision of those *^%$@@^& philistines or you can bemoan your own lack of talent. Another tack is to just muse about it for a moment and shrug, for you like the shot, if indeed you do, and be done with external and internal chatter. Grin and move on.
09/14/2018 09:07:19 AM · #2
some of my favorite pics I've taken and put on this site have been some of my lowest scoring, but it's because they mean something to me, and it took a long time to disconnect the fact that doesn't translate to votes
09/14/2018 09:07:36 AM · #3
Thanks, I needed that this morning. Yes. Yeah, I do. See ya later.
09/14/2018 10:02:30 AM · #4
Originally posted by streetpigeon:

Ever wake up in the morning after rollover to find your entry mangled and bleeding?


Ah yes, let's see, last time was exactly a week ago, LOL. But then I expected it ;-)
There is great truth in your statement that we need to disconnect the personal meaning of a shot with the intrinsic quality of the image as perceived by voters at large. It's not an easy thing to do.
09/14/2018 10:41:51 AM · #5
Wisest words ever posted on DPC
09/14/2018 10:52:05 AM · #6
Yes. Perfect advice.

09/14/2018 12:41:33 PM · #7
IImportant topic, worthy of discussion. Hope my little essay here stimulates more, even though I am submitting too many words for a typical reply entry.

Coming from a strong background in science, I took the long way around to realizing that works of art, including photographic images, take on an actual life of their own when they are released into the world. The reality of the artwork extends surprisingly far away from the pigments on the painting, the metal in the sculpture, the pixels in the image.

We often first see an image based on the resemblance to the world around us, noticing all face-value elements of the composition. The viewer picks out what seems to be the main subject, what is in the background, how the identifiable objects are positioned in relation to each other, and much more. What aspects dominate, which ones detract, what is a distraction, how easy or difficult is it to grasp what we see? Even at this level, different people notice different things. “Reality” of the image begins to be more fluid than expected right away.

Then the viewer may perceive the elements of design. Line, colors, shapes, contrast, repetition, light, shadow, sharpness, and many other aspects enhance or detract from the image. These abstract concepts leap into consciousness for some viewers but remain in the subconscious for others. Interestingly, the perception of such aspects can be affected by what the viewer has seen and/or experienced recently. In a profoundly deep way, the eyes of each beholder affect the reality of the artwork (and in different ways for different people).

More importantly, the reality of the artwork lives very much in the realm of meaning, emotion, and impact on each viewer. Art exists in a reality that includes how it evokes layers of meaning that flow not just from the content of the image but also from the context. How does this image fit in the flow of other images, spread over time like a grand conversation? Is there something original here? What thoughts and emotions emerge from each viewer based on what the viewer has done and learned and experienced so far in life? Thank goodness we are not all the same. How fascinating to learn how others have various understandings of what the art has to say. The votes and comments provide glimpses of the life our artwork has out there in the world.

So I gradually learned that my precious artwork progeny cannot remain bound by the confines of my own thoughts, emotions, and history. What a mistake to think of my images as objective and static entities that others should appreciate only the way I do. What a valuable opportunity to learn from diverse reactions, favorable or unfavorable. And how interesting that the process becomes part of my own ongoing context, sometimes to be shrugged off, and sometimes affecting my future artwork in subtle and unexpected ways.


Message edited by author 2018-09-14 13:58:29.
09/14/2018 04:41:36 PM · #8
Interesting how DPC has become a place for SWOT analysis. Not a bad thing in fact, quite the opposite. People are actually analyzing their thoughts, motivations, weaknesses, and strengths through their photography. Any thoughts on this?
09/14/2018 06:11:15 PM · #9
Life in the arts easily promotes self-reflection. But such examination may differ considerably from SWOT analysis. Listening to music, we may notice ourselves perking up as familiar notes reveal new harmonies and patterns and lyrics gently stir emotions. Reading poetry, we may discover ourselves finding ordinary words speaking to us in new ways through new rhythms, unexpected rhymes, and original juxtapositions. Reflecting on ourselves and our art, we may find insight from both illumination and darkness. These revelations can improve our art and our lives. SWOT typically aims at increasing the chance of "success." Self reflection in the arts typically challenges us to critically re-consider what "success" might mean.
09/14/2018 07:23:54 PM · #10
I remember in college studying for a test and not understanding the material as hard as I tried. I would leave it alone and come back to it in a day or 2 and it was sometimes as if an epiphany had occurred and everything became clear to me. Composing a photograph is sometimes like that. I find that if I have an idea and I can't get it to work it's best to leave it and then come back to it in a while. It often creates new inspiration and a different way of looking at the same subject. This is why I love to look at other photographer's pictures to see how they interpret the same concept.
09/14/2018 08:25:02 PM · #11
Originally posted by GolferDDS:

I remember in college studying for a test and not understanding the material as hard as I tried. I would leave it alone and come back to it in a day or 2 and it was sometimes as if an epiphany had occurred and everything became clear to me.

I had that experience with a Sunday NY Times crossword when I came back to the previously-blank puzzle six months after I threw it into a box unanswered ...
09/14/2018 09:53:58 PM · #12
Originally posted by bob350:

SWOT typically aims at increasing the chance of "success." Self reflection in the arts typically challenges us to critically re-consider what "success" might mean.


SWOT can be used in a business context. But, it can also apply to the analysis of our strengths and weaknesses which is often how we look at photographic analogy and/or analysis.

Borrowing from Bob, the elements of design = line, colors, shapes, contrast, repetition, light, shadow, sharpness, and many other aspects that enhance or detract from an image.

We also see things differently at different times. Emotions enter into what we perceive and what we create. Do you ever wonder why sometimes everything falls into place and looks amazing? Is it an epiphany? Why all of a sudden is my equipment working so well? What made that happen the way it did? Was I in the right place at the right time? Why is that? (I'm starting to sound like Rachel Maddow)

But back to Ryan's original post, are votes really that important? If we just shoot for "votes" and we all know what that means and we all can pull that off.. if we choose to. Is that what photography is all about? How many of you actually shoot for votes? (be honest)
09/14/2018 10:59:49 PM · #13
Originally posted by digifotojo:

[quote=bob350] ... Do you ever wonder why sometimes everything falls into place and looks amazing? Is it an epiphany? Why all of a sudden is my equipment working so well? What made that happen the way it did? ...


Most likely a special feature reserved only for those using their equipment optimally: just execute the correct presses of certain buttons at the right time. Oh, if only I could do that more. [Sad face.] Come to think of it, pianos work that way too. [Dashes out the side door before getting clobbered.]
09/14/2018 11:37:50 PM · #14
Originally posted by streetpigeon:

Ever wake up in the morning after rollover to find your entry mangled and bleeding? We all have, probably. You can blame the lack of taste and vision of those *^%$@@^& philistines or you can bemoan your own lack of talent. Another tack is to just muse about it for a moment and shrug, for you like the shot, if indeed you do, and be done with external and internal chatter. Grin and move on.


OK.
09/15/2018 12:43:23 AM · #15
This is a terrific discussion with some interesting ideas being debated. That said, I've been fighting the urge, ever since I saw the thread topic "ever wake up in the morning?", to respond mischievously "Yeah, but a lot of times I wake up in the afternoon too!"

(Runs for shelter)
09/15/2018 01:02:07 AM · #16
I typically blame the midianites first but usually it is the philistines fault. Then I try to figure out why the voters don’t recognize greatness. Once that is done it’s time to go slay the dragon.
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