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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> How do I explain DPI to somebody??
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10/26/2004 09:52:00 AM · #1
They just don't get it.. Over and over again somebody will purchase a photo that has these stats:
(example) 1512x2268 :: 300dpi Print Size: 5.0"x7.6"

Now -- they get the pic.. and they open it in photoshop and claim thats its only 72DPI or 80 or 144... I try to explain that DPI refers to PRINT SIZE.. and they complain that they want the high resolution image that I promised!

are they talking about PPI? do you guys have this problem?
Jon
10/26/2004 09:57:06 AM · #2
hehe..

people who dont understand DPI get on my nerves quite quickly.. over the years of getting bugged about it, when i get someone who wants one of my photos at "300 dpi", i tell them, "my room is 12 inches per foot, how big is my room?" and they seem to get it quickly enough.
10/26/2004 10:34:08 AM · #3
Humbly, I admit I'm one of those dummies...I think I understand, though.

To use your example:

1512x2268 :: 300dpi Print Size: 5.0"x7.6"

The exact same file printed at 72dpi would be:

a) 5.0" x 7.6" at a lower quality?

b) or would it be a larger print at the same 'relative' quality?

As far as I understand it, it would be (a)...can you guys help me out here?

Edit: sorry to 'get on your nerves', guys...

Message edited by author 2004-10-26 10:34:34.
10/26/2004 10:43:44 AM · #4
insted of trying to explain it, why don't u deliver the shots the way they would like to see 'em. go to image size in PS and enter 300 dpi's in the resolution mode or better yet, in the cropping tool, set the size and resolution before cropping qand when u do it, you got it. just like they like it.

this is valid assuming your photos are "big" enough to support those resolutions.'

hope this helps,

LM

10/26/2004 10:46:21 AM · #5
Mike,

The file is defined by the number of pixels included. In this case 1512 by 2268, or 3.5 million total picture elements. If you spread those pixels out at the rate of 300 of them per inch, you get the 5 by 7.6 inch image. If you spread them out at the rate of 72 per inch, your image would be roughly 21 by 31.5 inches. The distance between the pixels would, however, be greater and the aparent image quality less.
10/26/2004 10:46:43 AM · #6
A 1512x2268 printed at 72 dpi (dots per inch) would be 1512/72 = 21" by 2268/72 = 31.5" .. so a huge image.. The number of pixels never change, only how many you cram in one inch. Take the same original image at 300 dots per inch, and you have a much smaller image.

Both have the same "quality" (of course you have to back up to appreciate the larger version) because they both have the same amount of information as the source.
10/26/2004 10:47:20 AM · #7
doh.. 20 seconds too late.. if ony the boss didn't walk in as i was typing it..
10/26/2004 10:49:06 AM · #8
I would redefine "high resolution" to them using pixel count rather than dpi ... explaining the dpi can be set to anything for any image.
10/26/2004 11:01:36 AM · #9
Okay, thanks guys!

10/26/2004 11:27:27 AM · #10
Originally posted by shutterstock:

They just don't get it.. Over and over again somebody will purchase a photo that has these stats:
(example) 1512x2268 :: 300dpi Print Size: 5.0"x7.6"

Now -- they get the pic.. and they open it in photoshop and claim thats its only 72DPI or 80 or 144... I try to explain that DPI refers to PRINT SIZE.. and they complain that they want the high resolution image that I promised!

are they talking about PPI? do you guys have this problem?
Jon


I have seen this issue come up around here quite often. I would have to believe that most graphic artists would know about DPI/PPI, but there could be some who do not. Someone who would make this claim probably is either very new to graphic design or they haven't ever purchased digital images anywhere before.

One possible suggeston:

Everywhere you have "High Resolution" on your site, make it a 'link' that opens up another page where you post a definition of 'high resolution'. On that page, you can define it for them, much in the way you did in your post here.
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