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10/24/2004 08:57:46 AM · #1
Help! Until I get my tripod for Xmas, can you give me suggestions on how to hold the camera and avoid camera shake?

Thanks :-)
10/24/2004 08:59:54 AM · #2
You can't do much if the shutter speed is less than approx. 1/30 however to limit shake squeezing your elbows into your sides and leaning against something like a wall or pole can help.


10/24/2004 09:44:40 AM · #3
When I'm stuck without a tripod, I use any of hte following:
- Brace the cam against any solid object. Trees/poles work great.
- Use a beanbag or any object found in your camera bag to shim a camera that's set on a horizontal surface
- Use a small tabletop tripod ($15-20). They have limitations, but can be lifesavers.
- Use a string tripod (google it)
- Use the self-timer if your cam has one to eliminate shake from pushing the shutter release
- For those really long exposures where you can take your hands off the cam, you can set the exposure for slightly longer than you need, and hold your hand in front of the lens for a second or so to let vibrations damp out. You can also use this trick as a pseudo-graduated ND filter.
10/24/2004 09:55:55 AM · #4
Wow - I like the string tripod - what a fantastic idea.

Now I wonder if Canon sell that white 'L' grade string ;-)

Message edited by author 2004-10-24 12:41:25.
10/24/2004 12:57:15 PM · #5
Please explain the string tripod and instructions for constructing one. Sounds very interesting.
10/24/2004 01:10:24 PM · #6
Kirbic means go to Google and type "string tripod", its the first link. Or click this one...String Tripod

Message edited by author 2004-10-24 13:11:33.
10/24/2004 04:06:36 PM · #7
I have also braced the camera and used my remote to trigger the shutter - this has worked very well for me a number of times.
10/24/2004 04:18:52 PM · #8
Dont drink the night before. :)
10/24/2004 05:29:25 PM · #9
If you don't have a tripode you can just passe the strap of the camera under your foot and push it up until you can get stability! hope you understand that! :)
10/24/2004 07:24:49 PM · #10
use like a rock or a table or something flat, and stableits all good lemme tell ya
10/24/2004 07:34:35 PM · #11
Originally posted by Riggs:

Dont drink the night before. :)


drink while you shoot lol
10/24/2004 08:02:11 PM · #12
Try holding your breath, too.
10/24/2004 08:03:48 PM · #13
Originally posted by bananashay:

Try holding your breath, too.

But not too long, it changes your white balance (you turn blue) ;)
10/24/2004 08:28:20 PM · #14
I am very limited in what ISO I use and and pretty much have to stick with 80, as 160 is noisy, and 320 is basically unuseable.

Here is what I have done to get clear shots in the 1/15 sec hand-held range. Take a breath, release about half of it out, elbows in and tucked to your sides, hold, gently pre-load the shutter for metering & focus, and slowly press, not push the shutter release.

Here are a couple of examples of what can be done at slow shutter speeds while still hand-holding:
1/13th second: 97375.jpg

1/15th second: 110356.jpg 113582.jpg (now that the challenge is over)

1/20th second: 80022.jpg 97422.jpg

1/40th second: 94700.jpg

Having a 5-year old camera and a lack of a tripod has really pushed me to learn how to hold really, really still.

Message edited by author 2004-10-25 10:57:26.
10/24/2004 08:50:30 PM · #15
Originally posted by bananashay:

Try holding your breath, too.


i know that many hunters pull the trigger on there breath out, to prevent "gun shake" i also use this technique with my camera.

also if possibly i will set down indian style and put my elbows on my knees, helps for me anyways.
10/25/2004 09:02:10 AM · #16
Thanks Everyone! One question, can I hold my corona in one hand and tap the shutter button with the other? LOL LOL :-)
10/25/2004 09:41:59 AM · #17
that was my old camera. but it was and is a good one!

Originally posted by BradP:

I am very limited in what ISO I
use and and pretty much have to stick with 80, as 160 is noisy, and 320 is basically unueable.

10/25/2004 09:57:24 AM · #18
Originally posted by Karalew:

Thanks Everyone! One question, can I hold my corona in one hand and tap the shutter button with the other? LOL LOL :-)


"WTF!", I thought when I read this the first time. I read that as: can I hold my cornea in one hand and tap the shutter button with the other?

:)
10/25/2004 10:41:34 AM · #19
I had never seen the string suggestion, and I really like it.

But what I would want is a string on a retractable coil (like one of those key chain things.) Then you could walk around with that bobble hanging from your camera, and when you want to stabilize, quickly pull it down, slip it under your foot, and you're set. When you're done, retract, and keep on walking.

Otherwise, you have to keep wrapping the string, or worse, tripping on it!

I am going to look for the right "retractable" cord. I hate carrying a tripod on hikes, so I carry a monopod. But even that's a pain.
10/25/2004 11:23:51 AM · #20
One thing I did not see mentioned was that the shorter the focal length the longer an exposure you can shoot. If you find yourself in dim light try shooting more wide angle shots and less telephoto.

The other thing I do if my shutter time is getting longer then I would like is to take a lot of shots of the same thing, there will be a randomness to how much the camera moves during anyone shot, a lot of shots gives you a better chance at getting one clear one.

Message edited by author 2004-10-25 11:24:18.
10/25/2004 12:07:46 PM · #21
You can't do that? LoL LOL :-)

Originally posted by skylen:

Originally posted by Karalew:

Thanks Everyone! One question, can I hold my corona in one hand and tap the shutter button with the other? LOL LOL :-)


"WTF!", I thought when I read this the first time. I read that as: can I hold my cornea in one hand and tap the shutter button with the other?

:)
10/25/2004 12:21:02 PM · #22
Originally posted by cpanaioti:

You can't do much if the shutter speed is less than approx. 1/30 however to limit shake squeezing your elbows into your sides and leaning against something like a wall or pole can help.


Not always 1/30 s, it depends on focal length (zoom).
Rule of thumb is that it is the reciprocal of focal lenght, so with a 300 mm zoom you are o.k. with 1/300 s. But it depends on the person.
And the suggestions in this thread will help you to get away with longer times.
10/25/2004 02:09:59 PM · #23
Originally posted by Karalew:

Help! Until I get my tripod for Xmas, can you give me suggestions on how to hold the camera and avoid camera shake?

Thanks :-)


Drink less coffee.........
10/25/2004 02:15:59 PM · #24
Originally posted by willem:

Originally posted by cpanaioti:

You can't do much if the shutter speed is less than approx. 1/30 however to limit shake squeezing your elbows into your sides and leaning against something like a wall or pole can help.


Not always 1/30 s, it depends on focal length (zoom).
Rule of thumb is that it is the reciprocal of focal lenght, so with a 300 mm zoom you are o.k. with 1/300 s. But it depends on the person.
And the suggestions in this thread will help you to get away with longer times.


You're right about it not always being 1/30 however the crop factor should be taken into account. So, at 300mm on a camera with a 1.6 crop factor the slowest shutter speed suggested is 1/480.
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