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02/11/2003 09:35:20 PM · #1
I need a lot of help trying to organize all my stuff but my main reason for posting this is to learn -- Where do I put my tripod --?
I'm going to be a tourist/photographer for 3 days this weekend and I wonder if you would bother with your tripods in the city and hope for the best or does your tripod go where you go? Do you have a special way you carry yours? I have been all over the internet looking for the perfect solution without any luck. The camera store has huge tripod bags for huge tripods. I don't have a heavy tripod but I feel silly just carrying it in my hand.
02/11/2003 09:52:56 PM · #2
Have you tried //www.lowepro.com/ ? I have a catalog of theirs and just looking through it briefly I don't see any tripod only bags, but they have all kinds of different backpacks that hole tripods as well as camera equipment.
02/11/2003 09:55:36 PM · #3
Hi Joanns.
I'd take mine or my monopod. My camera is usually on one or the other.
Did you look at the light weight tripods? Maybe you have a friend that has one if your is heavey duty.
I've find the monopod is very compact, light and quick to open and close in a crowd. I leave my camera on the monopod or tripod and with the strap around my hand and the camera close to my chest I hike all over. Keep your lens turned toward your body so it can't be bumped by a passerby.
Good luck and have a nice trip.
02/11/2003 09:55:52 PM · #4
I usually don't carry my tripod with me, especially if I'm going to be doing mostly outdoor shots. You'll need a tripod if you'll be doing low light indoor shots or nightshots. Leave it behind if you won't be taking alot of pictures.

I have a pretty lightweight tripod. I bought a carrying case that I can carry on my back, like a pack sack over one shoulder or over one shoulder and across my chest (wish I had a picture to explain). Works great.

Have fun being a tourist. Tell us all about it when you come back, and don't hesitate sharing your pictures.



02/11/2003 10:04:19 PM · #5
I advise you remove your camera when you move to another location unless it is only a short distance. ALWAYS stay with your stuff to guard against the snatch and run people. I usually leave gadget bag in car and only carry what I need at the moment (batteries, CF, filters) Telescope in the legs and don't be shy about carrying it. You will be glad you brought it. If your camera uses one of those electronic cable shutter releases, attach it securely to something. Mine does. I didn't.
The cable came unpluged and I lost one of the $100 buggers. The new one is tied to strap.
Have a happy time.
02/11/2003 10:23:36 PM · #6
Thanks for the advice Everybody. Kidyin, I looked at that Web site and I that's exactly what I need. I knew I wasn't asking for something that didn't exist. Having a BP with a spot for the tripod would be great when I need to hike a little and use my hands for something else. I'm going to check locally to see if can get something.

David, I'm glad you said what you said, don't be shy about carrying it. The first time I took my camera and tripod into Seattle and set it up to take a photo, I was being watched and I was the only one out there with a tripod.

Jacko, you must have a much steadier hand then I do.

Justine, I haven't tried a monopod, I'll have to try that some day. Both of my tripods are light weight. The good news is that I won't be alone this weekend, my wonderful niece is coming up to Seattle to visit and wants to take tonz (her spelling, not mine) of pictures. So, she can help carry things.

Thanks again.


02/11/2003 10:24:34 PM · #7
I've only recently got quick release plates for my tripod - fantastic - makes using the tripod so much more fun and less of a chore.
02/11/2003 11:12:53 PM · #8
Note that there was a link in a recent forum post to an article on monopod use. Also, if you are in a hurry, you can quickly extend one leg of your tripod and use it like a monopod -- it won't be as well-balanced, but may be better for you than shooting freehand.
02/11/2003 11:32:26 PM · #9
For carrying my SLIK tripod, I have used the nylon bag that my nylon folding chair came in. It works well for my because I can sling it over my shoulder. I must admit, however, that on most of my shoots I have a loving husband, (my own...lol) that so willingly carries my "stuff" for me.
02/12/2003 12:50:33 AM · #10
Jo Ann, Have you seen those backpacks that can carry a skateboard? I think that might be a great idea to get one of those. Of course I have one, well it is my boys backpack and it is quite handy. Good luck.
02/12/2003 11:25:05 AM · #11
Great advice everbody. I have decided to always go with my tripod - Onlookers might think I'm some international photojournalist LOL, or, well, a geek. Thanks again.
02/12/2003 11:33:47 AM · #12
How about just taking a beanbag? I take mine with me everywhere.

Bill (wackybill)
02/12/2003 11:38:59 AM · #13
When I didn't have a tripod I used "god" pods. Using whatever is flat and sturdy that can hold my camera. However, now that I have a tripod I take it with me all the time. It has a handle so it isn't too tough to carry.
02/12/2003 12:44:54 PM · #14
I wonder if this works for digital camera?

Do you know any similar product designed for digital camera?
02/12/2003 02:18:09 PM · #15
Great discussion! I have been in situations recently where I wished I'd brought my tripod, but didn't because of <insert reason du jour>. I've been considering a very small, ultra-compact tripod, just enough to get about a foot off of an available surface & provide two-axis tilt. Anyone aware of anything like this?
02/12/2003 02:33:42 PM · #16
Originally posted by kirbic:

Great discussion! I have been in situations recently where I wished I'd brought my tripod, but didn't because of <insert reason du jour>. I've been considering a very small, ultra-compact tripod, just enough to get about a foot off of an available surface & provide two-axis tilt. Anyone aware of anything like this?


I adore my manfrotto table-top kit for this. It is fantastic - I take it all the times that I don't want to take a big tripod.

The other thing that I didn't find intuative about a tripod (big or small) is that you don't have to put them on the ground. Collapse the legs down as far as they go, and open them out and then brace against a wall, you'll find it is rock solid - or a lamp post, etc.

With a tabletop one, you can do even more of that sort of thing.

You can find the minitripod I've got here

Message edited by author 2003-02-12 14:41:03.
02/12/2003 03:12:36 PM · #17
Here's an interesting tripod I picked up from REI. Ultrapod
It folds up small and has a V shape and velcro so that it can be strapped to just about anything to turn it into a tripod. The legs fold out to turn it into a table top tripod. Folded up I strap it to my hiking staff to make the staff a monopod. Handly little bugger.
02/12/2003 04:07:43 PM · #18
Originally posted by Seeker:

Here's an interesting tripod I picked up from REI. Ultrapod
It folds up small and has a V shape and velcro so that it can be strapped to just about anything to turn it into a tripod. The legs fold out to turn it into a table top tripod. Folded up I strap it to my hiking staff to make the staff a monopod. Handly little bugger.

And they have a smaller $10 version in addition to this $15 one. I have an REI near me. Thanks -- I will check it out!
I also have a tiny goose-neck tripod I got for $5 at Ritz Camera (one of our sponsors) which fills about the same role as a beanbag, and will clip into a shirt pocket.
02/12/2003 07:23:38 PM · #19
Originally posted by Seeker:

Here's an interesting tripod I picked up from REI. Ultrapod
It folds up small and has a V shape and velcro so that it can be strapped to just about anything to turn it into a tripod. The legs fold out to turn it into a table top tripod. Folded up I strap it to my hiking staff to make the staff a monopod. Handly little bugger.


Joe, thanks for the link..
I have an REI near me also, and I will check this one out. Gordon's unit is REALLY attractive, but being the cheapskate engineer I am, I'll probably try the Ultrapod. I really like the idea of the strap, I've often wished I could firmly atach my camera to something such as a lamp post for a city night shot.
I've got a major macro shoot for work this weekend, so if I can get the Ultrapod locally, I will give it a good workout almost immediately.
02/12/2003 08:15:55 PM · #20
I found a great bag for the hiking photographer! It's a Jansport that I found at BassPro for about $70. It's a day hiker that has over the shoulder straps, a waist strap, and chest strap. With all these supports you can weigh it down and it's still very light on your back! The front pocket is good for snacks. The middle pocket has lots of inner compartments to hold memory cards, filter kits, and what not. I use a camera bag that snuggly fits my camera for security and throw that in the main compartment. The cool part are the straps on the bottom of the bag, holds a tripod perfectly! It even has spots on the side to hold sport bottles.

I took a quick snapshot for ya!

DSCN2885.jpg
02/13/2003 01:31:11 AM · #21
One little thing that few ppl seem to use, but is such a nice thing to have... is a beanbag!

Yup, a lowly beanbag. Mine is homemade (from an old sock) and stuffed with rice, not beans. The great thing about them is their small size. They will fit into most any camera bag. And since my little camera doesn't even come with a cable release, I rely on the 10 second self timer-- a lot. I just set the camera on the bag, set the timer and wait for it to do its thing. It pliable enough to let your camera get into many positions, and is quite stable once you get it there. Though you do have be careful sometimes and watch that it doesnt fall off!

Also, if I should ever get into a survival type of situation... I know I have at least one last meal in the sock :)
02/13/2003 08:26:10 AM · #22
Well I poked around at REI last evening and decided to pick up the $15US Ultrapod II. I set it up on the kitchen table & tried some ambient light macro exposures at small apertures, e.g. => f8. I used my home-made cable release for my Nikon 995, and was able to achieve very sharp macro results with incredible DOF.
I'm sure this tripod, with it's glass-filled nylon legs, is not as stiff as the Bogen/Manfrotto 3007, but with a cable release, it's fine. And it fits in the very small front pouch of my camera bag, so it will go everywhere with me. I can't wait to strap it to something vertical.
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