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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Editing Software for Color Blindness
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08/10/2016 03:42:38 PM · #1
I know this might be a dumb question.

Recently I ran into someone who is "slightly color blind" he wants to start working with RAW files. Is there an editing software that helps with this. If not how do you cope with this challenge?

I know Paul and Paul (both SC are color blind...errrrr I think they are). Who else?
08/10/2016 05:10:57 PM · #2
It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness.

I am pretty sure there is some software which lets you calibrate your monitor to accommodate color-blindness, but I don't use it or have a handy link.

When I first started editing photos with Photoshop (scanned images -- there were no digital cameras then) I was taught to use the "Info" window to check what the colors were rather than relying on the monitor image -- but I was working in the offset printing world of CMYK color, and we had swatch books available which would show how the various color (ink) combinations would look when printed, which was the ultimate goal.

My particular form I describe as a lessened sensitivity to red, so I have trouble distinguishing colors where there is a red component, such as blue from purple/lavender, green from brown, etc. Mostly I edit both visually and using the PS info, but if it's an important image I'll ask someone else ...
08/10/2016 05:20:44 PM · #3
Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness....


If you ask the women in their lives, it's more like 80-100% ;-)
08/10/2016 05:38:36 PM · #4
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness....


If you ask the women in their lives, it's more like 80-100% ;-)


That's because your to lazy to match your clothes!!! Lol
08/10/2016 06:01:03 PM · #5
Originally posted by Ja-9:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness....


If you ask the women in their lives, it's more like 80-100% ;-)


That's because your to lazy to match your clothes!!! Lol


Dammit! She read me like a book!
08/10/2016 07:20:10 PM · #6
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness....


If you ask the women in their lives, it's more like 80-100% ;-)

Hmmm ... I think perhaps you are confusing the survey results with those for "selective deafness" ...
08/10/2016 07:21:48 PM · #7
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness....


If you ask the women in their lives, it's more like 80-100% ;-)

Hmmm ... I think perhaps you are confusing the survey results with those for "selective deafness" ...


Baaahaaaaahaaaaa
08/10/2016 08:06:20 PM · #8
I'm wondering if you're color blind can you still see contrast?
08/10/2016 08:59:41 PM · #9
Originally posted by pixelpig:

I'm wondering if you're color blind can you still see contrast?

Sure. Most people still see color, just not the same as "average" folks. And "pure" colors are usually no problem -- I can tell if a tomato is red or green -- but I might not be able to tell if a shirt is light blue or lavender, or a wall dark blue or purple.

I have a few entries where I overlooked a pink or greenish color-cast, but I think most of my pictures have pretty normal-looking color (at least those intended to -- I like to shift colors radically sometimes) ...
08/10/2016 10:50:17 PM · #10
I am red/ green deficient as well and editing has been a huge huge struggle for me since day one.

I can tell my blue from white but get same shades together and Im a gonner..
I can not tell pink from red .. I can not go shopping alone because I always make the mistake of buying the mis-matched color items of the wrong shades

To the question of seeing contrast, I can see contrast differences on whether something is darker or lighter, but the shades of that color, no I can not. Unfortunatly, as for the editing there is nothing to help with it.. I highly rely on the histogram and my alt keys for blacks, shadows, and white, sharpness and anything that I can use in the alt key.

When it comes to color hues, I have to have my friends help me and tell me.. hey, its too yellow, or hey, that is too green take down that saturation. I have certain colors that look good to my eyes. Others are just really hard for me to see. It is my friends eyes that I trust the most on what I need to do with an image.. black and white has been good for me to edit in because its nicer on the eyes for me.

But, after a while even though yes, I shoot raw I have learned to shoot in either auto white balance or cloudy white balance and that is all I shoot in, I have learned to manage my settings in manual mode only and I am learning my lighting now and what bear and can of worms that is. But each step is its own thing, Lightroom has been the best editor for me. I use photoshop for some things esp cloning things out, or doing some composite things, but lightroom is my go too. I have also learned to rely on the "snapshot" that lightroom has that way I can see before, during and after images that I take. I lovee that little part of lightroom the most.

Originally posted by kirbic:
Originally posted by GeneralE:
It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness....

If you ask the women in their lives, it's more like 80-100% ;-)

Hmmm ... I think perhaps you are confusing the survey results with those for "selective deafness" ... (Hilarious!)

Message edited by author 2016-08-10 22:57:38.
08/11/2016 07:22:13 AM · #11
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by GeneralE:

It's not a dumb question -- approximately 8-10% of males have some form of color-blindness....


If you ask the women in their lives, it's more like 80-100% ;-)

Hmmm ... I think perhaps you are confusing the survey results with those for "selective deafness" ...


What?

C'mon, you had to know that was coming :-)
08/11/2016 01:40:14 PM · #12
I am colour blind too. Can't tell the difference between brown and green or pink and white or purple and blue and the rest.

I don't do much RAW editing despite having a terrabyte of CR2 files but when I do I have not really thought much about it as all I do is move the sliders. Guess I probably don't get too complex so doesn't seem to be an issue for me. I have in the past had people report my entries to have a colour cast O want even aware of. That is annoying but not worth losing sleep over. I can see the world in all its beautiful colours. Funny how some people assume I must only see in black and white.
08/11/2016 02:29:52 PM · #13
I don't want to seem rude or insensitive, but color blindness fascinates me. I know nothing about it. I have the opposite problem. But, most of the time, does it matter? The only way anyone can see the world is through their own eyes. How do you find out you're color blind? And why would there need to be editing software for color blindness?

Long ago I decided that the best thing for a comp I want to display online is to let Photoshop auto-correct for color. Adjusting the color to suit my eyes & my monitor is not the best way to prepare it for online display. IMO. Anyone with color blindness could do the same thing. I'm not preparing for print media, where the color has to be specific & consistent, so I spend a lot more time adjusting contrast than I do adjusting color. That's why I was wondering if color blindness had any effect on contrast awareness. Color can be used to separate an object from it's background, just like contrast.

The comments from people in this thread are interesting. I'm glad you took the time.
08/11/2016 02:35:29 PM · #14
In answer to your question about how you find out you are colour blind I was caught out using a test like this at an interview to get a job as a platform attendant at a train station. Needless to say I didn't get the job as they needed someone who could identify the stop and go lights.

//enchroma.com/test/instructions/
08/11/2016 02:45:31 PM · #15
Color-blindness can be tested for using Ishihara Charts -- a set of patterns developed by a Japanese ophthamologist. The type of color-blindness is determined by which "hidden" numbers can/cannot be seen.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_21992.jpg

Color-blindness is not usually a significant handicap, but it can (depending on type and severity) exclude people from certain professions (e.g. electricians, pilots) where recognition of color-coded elements is critical.
08/11/2016 02:55:46 PM · #16
Wow, so you then don't know until you fail an eye exam or a test for a job? I'd think that would be upsetting. Failing a test is one thing, but 'feeling' color blind is something else again. I'd imagine nobody 'feels' color blind.

Message edited by author 2016-08-11 15:07:31.
08/11/2016 03:03:06 PM · #17
Originally posted by pixelpig:

Wow, so you then don't know until you fail an eye exam or a test for a job? I'd think that would be upsetting. Failing a test is one thing, but 'feeling' color blind is something else again.


Lol it isn't really isn't a big deal. I have managed to work as a website designer for quite a few years being colour blind. I didn't want to be a pilot so not worried on that front. These days they test at school for colour blindness I am sure.
08/11/2016 03:10:26 PM · #18
I took that online test & discovered I probably have the lens of my eye turning yellow-ish from age & exposure to sunlight, affecting my blue-yellow color vision. Wow. Interesting.
08/11/2016 03:11:35 PM · #19
I got tested around age 5(?) when my parents noticed that I couldn't tell that some pine trees were dead and brown ... I suspect this is a common scenario. Also, it's not like it's a hard test -- you just have to look at some cards and say whether or not you can see a number in the pattern of dots. As long as the subject is old enough to read numbers almost anyone can perform (though not necessarily interpret) the test.

There's another simple test which can be performed with three colored cards and a white/gray wall which can define a person's visual field for each color -- color-sensitive cone cells are not evenly distributed in the retina.
08/11/2016 04:48:53 PM · #20
I was tested when I had a very serious head and neck injury, shoulder& collar bone break when I fell off from a horse training it for trail rides. I love my auto color correct too lolol
08/11/2016 05:00:00 PM · #21
Has anyone tried the glass' that correct your color blindness? The reactions to being able to "see color" for the first time gives me tingles!!!

See Color for the first time

Bought color correcting glass' for their color blind friend

There's just a couple examples.

I can't imagine not seeing the sunset/sunrise colors or the colors of flowers. These glasses "open their eyes" n lets them "see" the world of color...amazing what technology can do for us!!!

Message edited by GeneralE - Fixed links.
08/11/2016 11:30:30 PM · #22
Thats super cool!!!

I would love to see the shade differences

Message edited by author 2016-08-11 23:50:59.
08/12/2016 07:21:07 AM · #23
Both my brothers are colour blind and am reminded of a family story:

Grandpa, on being told his eldest grandson is colour blind decides to run his own test. Reports back 'He's not colour blind! I asked him the colour of that football and he said it was brown". But Grandpa, it's green.......

:-)
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