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03/20/2015 12:50:03 PM · #1
So, the time has come to finally retire my main computer, an aged, well used white MacBook (early 2008). It's on its second keyboard, second display. It's maxed out with a whopping 4GB RAM and OSX 10.7.5 . It's fine for surfing the web or what have you, but things like Lightroom and/or Photoshop really bog it down. Forget about video editing with Final Cut. I also run Win 7 (via rEFInd) on it for those few applications that I need that don't play with Mac (The software for programming my radios, etc). I also have other PC software that I would like to run on it as well like LabView, Autodesk Inventor, etc. The strongest contender as a replacement right now is a MacBookPro with OSX and Win8.1 via Bootcamp, but I'm looking for suggestions for a PC Laptop that can handle the workload. Converting licenses from Mac to PC shouldn't be a big deal.

I've looked at some of the "gaming" laptops and while they're powerful, they all seem to be dedicated towards pwning noobs and not really towards getting work done…

The essential heavy load applications in no specific order:

Lightroom
Photoshop
LabView
Inventor
MS Office
FinalCutPro (or Adobe Premiere PRO on PC)

Thoughts?

03/20/2015 01:03:37 PM · #2
I know you are specifically asking for a PC Laptop, but I have to agree that the best for me is still the MacBookPro. I haven't seen anything in the PC Laptop department that comes even close.
03/20/2015 01:33:39 PM · #3
You might want to check out a SurfacePro3. I recently got one and am very happy so far. I recently used it on location tethered to my 5DMK3 - worked great. The pen is really precise and it is nice to be able to use it as a touch screen as well as docked to the Surface keyboard. Handles Photoshop, Lightroom and Corel Painter easily.

Battery life is not it's strong suit. It is a bit pricey as well. I didn't care for W8.1 particularly, but once I discovered the "SurfacePro Desktop" tile, which opens a screen that very closely resembles Win7, I was very comfortable navigating, using a combo of touch, keystroke, pen and the keyboard touchpad. I already had a USB3 hub, which allows for lots of connectivity. There is an optional docking station that is even more expandable.

They offer several models - the one I got is the i7, 8g, 256gSSD.
03/20/2015 01:53:48 PM · #4
I have to have windows 7 for working from home, I would love a mac myself.

Macs are the best for photography, but I have to consider my budget and it must be compatible so I can keep working from home... and those macs are too over budget and too expensive for my tastes, plus they don't have the memory or hard drive that I need either. Not paying double for something I can get half that price.

The PC I have found was at best buy and it is what I will be getting for my next PC in the next few months.
My PC now I have is an HP and I Have had it over 4yrs.
In store it is less than $850.00

Leveno

Message edited by author 2015-03-20 14:01:13.
03/20/2015 02:49:15 PM · #5
Bear in mind the latest gaming laptops have great video cards and are usually 64bit - the new Lightroom (v6) will be 64bit only AND run better with a good graphics card, harnessing the power of the GPU to improve rendering/editing speed. Photoshop already uses GPU to improve performance, so dont write them off totally if you can afford them.

Originally posted by Spork99:

So, the time has come to finally retire my main computer, an aged, well used white MacBook (early 2008). It's on its second keyboard, second display. It's maxed out with a whopping 4GB RAM and OSX 10.7.5 . It's fine for surfing the web or what have you, but things like Lightroom and/or Photoshop really bog it down. Forget about video editing with Final Cut. I also run Win 7 (via rEFInd) on it for those few applications that I need that don't play with Mac (The software for programming my radios, etc). I also have other PC software that I would like to run on it as well like LabView, Autodesk Inventor, etc. The strongest contender as a replacement right now is a MacBookPro with OSX and Win8.1 via Bootcamp, but I'm looking for suggestions for a PC Laptop that can handle the workload. Converting licenses from Mac to PC shouldn't be a big deal.

I've looked at some of the "gaming" laptops and while they're powerful, they all seem to be dedicated towards pwning noobs and not really towards getting work done…

The essential heavy load applications in no specific order:

Lightroom
Photoshop
LabView
Inventor
MS Office
FinalCutPro (or Adobe Premiere PRO on PC)

Thoughts?
03/20/2015 03:24:36 PM · #6
I've also been looking at high-powered laptops, and one that seems to fit the bill as far as capability is the Dell M3800. It's available with a 4k screen, which is a very nice option. Dell's business laptops seem to be very reliable machines. I cannot say the same for their consumer laptops, however.
If I were to buy the M3800, I think I would do a lot of the upgrades myself. Dell seems to charge far too much for some of the optional stuff.
03/20/2015 04:44:46 PM · #7
Oh, I'm absolutely not writing them off, my concern was that the gaming laptops are in some way unsuited for my use. The gaming laptops seem to be on par price wise with the MacBookPro.

Originally posted by Simms:

Bear in mind the latest gaming laptops have great video cards and are usually 64bit - the new Lightroom (v6) will be 64bit only AND run better with a good graphics card, harnessing the power of the GPU to improve rendering/editing speed. Photoshop already uses GPU to improve performance, so dont write them off totally if you can afford them.

Originally posted by Spork99:

So, the time has come to finally retire my main computer, an aged, well used white MacBook (early 2008). It's on its second keyboard, second display. It's maxed out with a whopping 4GB RAM and OSX 10.7.5 . It's fine for surfing the web or what have you, but things like Lightroom and/or Photoshop really bog it down. Forget about video editing with Final Cut. I also run Win 7 (via rEFInd) on it for those few applications that I need that don't play with Mac (The software for programming my radios, etc). I also have other PC software that I would like to run on it as well like LabView, Autodesk Inventor, etc. The strongest contender as a replacement right now is a MacBookPro with OSX and Win8.1 via Bootcamp, but I'm looking for suggestions for a PC Laptop that can handle the workload. Converting licenses from Mac to PC shouldn't be a big deal.

I've looked at some of the "gaming" laptops and while they're powerful, they all seem to be dedicated towards pwning noobs and not really towards getting work done…

The essential heavy load applications in no specific order:

Lightroom
Photoshop
LabView
Inventor
MS Office
FinalCutPro (or Adobe Premiere PRO on PC)

Thoughts?
03/20/2015 06:23:10 PM · #8
I would say a business laptop from just about any company would be fine, whichever you like the keyboard and screen on.

An SSD sure speeds things up - I would recommend putting one in and having an external drive to store things.

I am on a 17 inch MBP from when they still made them, but I added a 256gb SSD which I like a lot.

I had an HP business laptop for a while which was pretty good, but doesn't hold up cosmetically to wear and tear like the aluminum MBP. Screen was low resolution too.
03/21/2015 01:52:03 AM · #9
With Apples transition to Intel over 10 years ago there are no real hardware differences except quality based on price point and Operating system. BTW I know that it is against Apples Licensing but you can run any OS on either brand. Apple is now nothing more than a brand. A quality brand, but you do pay for the glowing apple on their systems. I would suggest if you are looking for a powerful laptop to look at the HP elite book Workstations. Those are work horses. Most carry a 3 year warranty and onsite repair. Having spent 20 plus years in IT I run from Dell, Acer, Toshiba. I will say Lenovo still makes a decent system. If you are wanting to play games then you are going to have to sacrifice the workstations video card and go with a gaming video card. Great if your gaming. Not quite as good at rendering video or 2d graphics as a fire pro or a Quattro will do. I agree with MadMan2k make sure you put a SSD in it.
03/22/2015 11:35:14 AM · #10
Originally posted by coronamv:

BTW I know that it is against Apples Licensing but you can run any OS on either brand.


I have yet to see OSX installed and running reliably on a non-Apple computer. Yes, I know people have made it work…sort of… Usually building some kind of FrankenMac by faking Apple's system management controller chip, swapping out different sound cards, video cards and what have you and using hacked and questionably stable drivers to make a desktop system that works only about 30% of the time. Making that work in a laptop where swapping out cards simply isn't an option is even less likely. I need something that I can turn on, and use…not turn, fiddle with for 2 hours and then get to use it.

I think it would be an interesting experiment to try, but not one I'm going to conduct on my primary laptop anytime soon.

If I go PC, I recognize I'll have to give up my existing OSX only software.

03/22/2015 02:55:00 PM · #11
Any way you can hold off for 9 months or so? By that time, Win 10 should be out, and there should be a general consensus on its merit. If you don't have Win 8 (my work won't let me go there), then there is a HUGE adjustment. I've had good success with Win 8, as far as performance and reliability, but it was a big adjustment. Win 7 has the same issue as XP - in that it has limited longevity (MS is wanting to obsolete it just like they did XP).
Hardware - I'd suggest a current or prior generation Intel i7 (or i5 if you have to for budget restraints) processor. 6-8+ G memory (the more the merrier), upgraded video (for the reasons others have posted). Hard drive is problematic, since you really, really, really want a SSD (Crucial.com has a 512G SSD for $200-220). No matter what the specs say, the SSD performance is noticeably better. I've added SSDs as my system drive on both my home desktop and laptop. The problem is in the market - to get the nicer laptop, they're going to chuck in a larger hard drive, which you don't need. My suggestion would be to buy an external enclosure, the Crucial 512G SSD, clone the laptop hard drive to the SSD, swap the drives, putting the stock hard drive in the external enclosure, and the SSD in the laptop. (If you're not comfortable doing that, Geek Squad or a computer store can do it for you - it isn't a big deal.) Also, I'd suggest having an external monitor for your laptop when working on pictures - moving the laptop display back and forth can significantly change how an image looks.
A touch screen is nice, but I find that I seldom use it - my laptop has it, my desktop doesn't, my work pc doesn't. So much for keeping up with technology...
Check online for laptop brand reliability - it changes pretty often, and isn't always what you'd expect based on brand names. I've had great luck with Toshiba, but also had one Toshiba laptop that was the worst. My current unit is an Acer ($500 with touch screen two years ago, i3 processor), but it seems rather sluggish, and I avoid doing any photo editing on it if possible.
You're probably looking at the $800 - $1200 range for cost, especially with the add-on monitor and SSD.
Personally, since you already have an Apple, I'd nudge you in that direction - though the reasons you give for the PC are all valid. I'm just concerned that you'll be disappointed by Windows in comparison. And, there are several good virtual machine software packages (free) that will let you run Windows on an Apple.
I just love shiny new toys - do let us know what you settled on. Best to you.
03/22/2015 03:08:35 PM · #12
FWIW - MS is giving free Win 10 upgrades with all Win 7 and Win 8 licenses, so I can buy now and upgrade later. Apple won't allow you to install Win 7 on their newer MacBook Pro's with BootCamp. Though there are ways around it with a different boot loader like rEFInd.

Given the performance, the SSD is pretty much a given. I'm still leaning towards a 15" MacBookPro with SSD and running Windows via boot camp, the VM approach is a lot more convenient, but takes away too much in terms of performance.

Originally posted by dtremain:

Any way you can hold off for 9 months or so? By that time, Win 10 should be out, and there should be a general consensus on its merit. If you don't have Win 8 (my work won't let me go there), then there is a HUGE adjustment. I've had good success with Win 8, as far as performance and reliability, but it was a big adjustment. Win 7 has the same issue as XP - in that it has limited longevity (MS is wanting to obsolete it just like they did XP).
Hardware - I'd suggest a current or prior generation Intel i7 (or i5 if you have to for budget restraints) processor. 6-8+ G memory (the more the merrier), upgraded video (for the reasons others have posted). Hard drive is problematic, since you really, really, really want a SSD (Crucial.com has a 512G SSD for $200-220). No matter what the specs say, the SSD performance is noticeably better. I've added SSDs as my system drive on both my home desktop and laptop. The problem is in the market - to get the nicer laptop, they're going to chuck in a larger hard drive, which you don't need. My suggestion would be to buy an external enclosure, the Crucial 512G SSD, clone the laptop hard drive to the SSD, swap the drives, putting the stock hard drive in the external enclosure, and the SSD in the laptop. (If you're not comfortable doing that, Geek Squad or a computer store can do it for you - it isn't a big deal.) Also, I'd suggest having an external monitor for your laptop when working on pictures - moving the laptop display back and forth can significantly change how an image looks.
A touch screen is nice, but I find that I seldom use it - my laptop has it, my desktop doesn't, my work pc doesn't. So much for keeping up with technology...
Check online for laptop brand reliability - it changes pretty often, and isn't always what you'd expect based on brand names. I've had great luck with Toshiba, but also had one Toshiba laptop that was the worst. My current unit is an Acer ($500 with touch screen two years ago, i3 processor), but it seems rather sluggish, and I avoid doing any photo editing on it if possible.
You're probably looking at the $800 - $1200 range for cost, especially with the add-on monitor and SSD.
Personally, since you already have an Apple, I'd nudge you in that direction - though the reasons you give for the PC are all valid. I'm just concerned that you'll be disappointed by Windows in comparison. And, there are several good virtual machine software packages (free) that will let you run Windows on an Apple.
I just love shiny new toys - do let us know what you settled on. Best to you.
03/22/2015 05:15:29 PM · #13
I had done some research recently to purchase a rather portable (~3.2 lb) laptop for video editing. If weight is not an issue, //www.xoticpc.com has a nice variety of alternative brands. Getting a laptop with a top end i7 cpu with decent nivida gfx and matte IPS screen is key. In addition to Dell, Samsung also has a nice new lineup worth looking at.

Message edited by author 2015-03-22 17:17:18.
04/03/2015 04:00:49 PM · #14
I think Apple has incorporated a deal killer (for me anyway) into their latest MacBook and MacBook Pro laptops. In pursuit of ever lighter and thinner laptops, they've migrated design features from the MacBook Air into the other MacBooks. The battery, the storage and the RAM are so integrated into the machine that they can't be easily replaced, essentially making the computer non-upgradeable. Battery dead? Too bad. Need more storage? Nope…can't do it. Need more RAM? Nope…you'll have to buy another machine. It's that, pay major$$$ for service or buy the parts and perform major surgery yourself. WTF Apple?

I guess I'm PC shopping...

Message edited by author 2015-04-03 16:01:06.
04/03/2015 06:02:36 PM · #15
Originally posted by Spork99:

The battery, the storage and the RAM are so integrated into the machine that they can't be easily replaced, essentially making the computer non-upgradeable. Battery dead? Too bad. Need more storage? Nope…can't do it. Need more RAM? Nope…you'll have to buy another machine. It's that, pay major$$$ for service or buy the parts and perform major surgery yourself. WTF Apple?

This isn't exactly new for Apple -- the first Macs required a special wrench and "cracker" tool just to open the case, and I seem to remember versions with the RAM soldered to the motherboard ...

Me, I'm more annoyed with websites (like my bank) which upgrade a page so that you need a new browser to see it, which means a new OS which means a new computer -- just so they could display some fancy graphics or something ...
04/03/2015 07:40:15 PM · #16
Originally posted by Spork99:

I think Apple has incorporated a deal killer (for me anyway) into their latest MacBook and MacBook Pro laptops. In pursuit of ever lighter and thinner laptops, they've migrated design features from the MacBook Air into the other MacBooks. The battery, the storage and the RAM are so integrated into the machine that they can't be easily replaced, essentially making the computer non-upgradeable. Battery dead? Too bad. Need more storage? Nope…can't do it. Need more RAM? Nope…you'll have to buy another machine. It's that, pay major$$$ for service or buy the parts and perform major surgery yourself. WTF Apple?

I guess I'm PC shopping...


So it's now an iBook ;-)
04/03/2015 08:06:34 PM · #17
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by Spork99:

The battery, the storage and the RAM are so integrated into the machine that they can't be easily replaced, essentially making the computer non-upgradeable. Battery dead? Too bad. Need more storage? Nope…can't do it. Need more RAM? Nope…you'll have to buy another machine. It's that, pay major$$$ for service or buy the parts and perform major surgery yourself. WTF Apple?

This isn't exactly new for Apple -- the first Macs required a special wrench and "cracker" tool just to open the case, and I seem to remember versions with the RAM soldered to the motherboard ...

Me, I'm more annoyed with websites (like my bank) which upgrade a page so that you need a new browser to see it, which means a new OS which means a new computer -- just so they could display some fancy graphics or something ...


The previous versions of the MacBook (like the one I currently use) and MacBook Pro were pretty easy to work on and upgrade. I've swapped RAM, upgraded Hard Drives and batteries, all with a minimum of fuss. The MacBook Air was the first MacBook to have a non-replaceable battery, no Optical Drive, along with memory and storage that could not be upgraded. There were computers with RAM soldered to the motherboard, but most of them also had expansion slots for more RAM. The point is that Apple has decided to across the board, sacrifice the consumers ability to upgrade and maintain their machine in the name of thinness and weight savings, two things which are pretty meaningless for my purposes. I simply don't care if my laptop weighs 7lb and isn't paper thin.
04/06/2015 03:51:21 AM · #18
I feel your pain as far as price, upgradable etc. But your macbook has lasted 7 years before you wanted to replace it. That is fantastic! I use Dell and HP for work and I can't say I have ever had that mileage out of a laptop. I, too have a MBP that is 6 yrs old ( and still going strong). I replaced it and gave it to my son ( who is still using it). I also thought the lack of upgrade path would be a bother. I must admit the only concerns I have had is I wished I had got the 1 TB hard drive. I got the 500G one and filled it up pretty quickly with photos ( I don't like having portable drives hanging off my laptop . But in my household I don't have the luxury of an office or spare room ( dining room table - therefore my dislike of plugged in harddrives - but this may not be an issue with you).
The new MBP's seem pricy - but if you get a 7 year run out of it , then it pays for itself. Not that I have any issues with the Win alteritives - but if you are familiar with and like the system - then check it out before you make your mind up. What it feels like to you makes a big difference as well - certainly the win machines I have to work with ( Dell & HP ) I don't "like" to work on - the mac " feels" so much better. I haven't tried Asus or the other brands - so they might be different.
Bottom line - go and have a play with the new macs - compare them with the equivalent machines in the other brands. If they " feel" as good - and have a " longevity " reputation - go for it.
04/06/2015 08:22:53 PM · #19
I agree that they are great machines, but the primary reason I got 7 years out of my current MacBook is because I was able to upgrade it with more RAM, new and bigger HD and to replace the battery and even the keyboard without major hassle and expense. I'm on the 3rd battery, second keyboard and the 4th HD. If I were able to get a MacBook Pro that I could do those things, I would have already made the purchase. Unfortunately, it seems that in the name of lighter and thinner Apple has engineered out the very things that let me use a single machine for 7 years instead believing that I'll just be willing to plonk down another $2000 in a couple of years for a new one.

Even many of the Dell and HP machines are the similar, but not as bad. So far, the only laptops I've found that retain the accessibility and serviceability I need are the 15" Dell m4800 and the behemoth 17" Dell m6800.

Originally posted by Tajhad:

I feel your pain as far as price, upgradable etc. But your macbook has lasted 7 years before you wanted to replace it. That is fantastic! I use Dell and HP for work and I can't say I have ever had that mileage out of a laptop. I, too have a MBP that is 6 yrs old ( and still going strong). I replaced it and gave it to my son ( who is still using it). I also thought the lack of upgrade path would be a bother. I must admit the only concerns I have had is I wished I had got the 1 TB hard drive. I got the 500G one and filled it up pretty quickly with photos ( I don't like having portable drives hanging off my laptop . But in my household I don't have the luxury of an office or spare room ( dining room table - therefore my dislike of plugged in harddrives - but this may not be an issue with you).
The new MBP's seem pricy - but if you get a 7 year run out of it , then it pays for itself. Not that I have any issues with the Win alteritives - but if you are familiar with and like the system - then check it out before you make your mind up. What it feels like to you makes a big difference as well - certainly the win machines I have to work with ( Dell & HP ) I don't "like" to work on - the mac " feels" so much better. I haven't tried Asus or the other brands - so they might be different.
Bottom line - go and have a play with the new macs - compare them with the equivalent machines in the other brands. If they " feel" as good - and have a " longevity " reputation - go for it.
04/06/2015 08:45:58 PM · #20
Originally posted by GeneralE:



Me, I'm more annoyed with websites (like my bank) which upgrade a page so that you need a new browser to see it, which means a new OS which means a new computer -- just so they could display some fancy graphics or something ...


It's more about security than being able to use fancy graphics. Older operating systems and Web browsers, like Windows XP and Internet Explorer 6, are flagrantly insecure. Banks care about that for some reason.
04/06/2015 09:02:31 PM · #21
Originally posted by Ann:

Originally posted by GeneralE:



Me, I'm more annoyed with websites (like my bank) which upgrade a page so that you need a new browser to see it, which means a new OS which means a new computer -- just so they could display some fancy graphics or something ...


It's more about security than being able to use fancy graphics. Older operating systems and Web browsers, like Windows XP and Internet Explorer 6, are flagrantly insecure. Banks care about that for some reason.

I guess ... perhaps banks was a bad example -- I used to check the ESPN for current scores, but the link to that page now (since last week) displays nothing but a series of Tweets ... :-(
04/07/2015 12:10:32 AM · #22
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by Ann:

Originally posted by GeneralE:



Me, I'm more annoyed with websites (like my bank) which upgrade a page so that you need a new browser to see it, which means a new OS which means a new computer -- just so they could display some fancy graphics or something ...


It's more about security than being able to use fancy graphics. Older operating systems and Web browsers, like Windows XP and Internet Explorer 6, are flagrantly insecure. Banks care about that for some reason.

I guess ... perhaps banks was a bad example -- I used to check the ESPN for current scores, but the link to that page now (since last week) displays nothing but a series of Tweets ... :-(


Welcome to the future. Actual reporting is replaced by social media outbursts from nobodies. The "real" media are too busy getting their nails done and stirring up trouble for pizzeria owners in Indiana.
04/07/2015 12:58:51 AM · #23
I used Asus N550JV for more than a year. The screen has a bit of a yellow cast but I edit on a 24" Dell monitor for color proofing. The LCD screen has been replaced once but is not a common issue. The SD card is currently being fixed. The warranty is two years. Can upgrade the Ram up to 16G (already done), can upgrade / change the hdd, can replace the built in battery. Apart of the small glitches mentioned I am very pleased with its power and I consider it a very good value.

Mine has the 4G graphic card and is the non touch mate screen.

Message edited by author 2015-04-07 01:00:26.
04/07/2015 05:56:48 PM · #24
In the actual state of the art laptop vs Macbook there isn't a performance difference as the price diference might sugest. But of course if you seek reliability and performance, price is not going to be miles away anyway.

I've recently gone to that root myself. Going full time as a photohtapher ment that mode on the go editing was a major need. So I just skeeped the desktop + laptop for the studio and went directly to a strong laptop for all th ework I need.

I second what was said before, the gaming laptops in terms of computing power will be the closest thing to a Macbookpro. The "professional" lines that all the brands have for company usage are normally more reliable, much more expensive, but not as powerfull. For me the best bang for the bucjk that I could find was th elow end Asus ROG and the MSI gaming laptops. If you go to the high end of the ROG or Alioenware laptops you became very close or even more expensive than a Mac, for a marginal gain in the performance department.

I went to a asus rog gl551jm-cn213h, with an 120GB SSD plus 1TB HDD, 16GB of RAM, Blu-ray unit, i7-4710HQ Quad-Core, 2.5 GHz processor. For me portability was a big issue, so I went for the 15inc version. I also have in the studio a good HP IPS 24´monitor that I use wen I'm there editing photos. This was about 800euros/1000USD less than the equivalent specs Mackbook pro. And I'mve very satisfied with the performance so far.
04/07/2015 10:20:45 PM · #25
I found the gaming machines focus more on speed.

The Dell workstation replacement laptops like the m4800 are targeting the same users that really do need the performance of a MacBook Pro, video/movie editors using 4k and the like. With a few tweaks, I can get a machine that's capable of not just photos, but easily handling large solid model assemblies, say of an entire motor vehicle.

I used to have a PC that I built using an Asus motherboard, but when I bought two low end Asus laptops for my boys, I found them loaded with resource hogging bloatware…ugh.

Originally posted by Nuno:

In the actual state of the art laptop vs Macbook there isn't a performance difference as the price diference might sugest. But of course if you seek reliability and performance, price is not going to be miles away anyway.

I've recently gone to that root myself. Going full time as a photohtapher ment that mode on the go editing was a major need. So I just skeeped the desktop + laptop for the studio and went directly to a strong laptop for all th ework I need.

I second what was said before, the gaming laptops in terms of computing power will be the closest thing to a Macbookpro. The "professional" lines that all the brands have for company usage are normally more reliable, much more expensive, but not as powerfull. For me the best bang for the bucjk that I could find was th elow end Asus ROG and the MSI gaming laptops. If you go to the high end of the ROG or Alioenware laptops you became very close or even more expensive than a Mac, for a marginal gain in the performance department.

I went to a asus rog gl551jm-cn213h, with an 120GB SSD plus 1TB HDD, 16GB of RAM, Blu-ray unit, i7-4710HQ Quad-Core, 2.5 GHz processor. For me portability was a big issue, so I went for the 15inc version. I also have in the studio a good HP IPS 24´monitor that I use wen I'm there editing photos. This was about 800euros/1000USD less than the equivalent specs Mackbook pro. And I'mve very satisfied with the performance so far.
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