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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Nikon + iTTL + exposure compensation
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01/02/2015 10:29:33 AM · #1
Anyone has any firsthand experience on this subject?
Consider a simple scenario with an on-camera external flash in TTL mode. There are 3 places where compensation can be adjusted: standard camera exposure compensation, in-camera flash exposure compensation, exposure compensation on the flash itself. What happens when you combine these setting?
01/02/2015 10:14:48 PM · #2
You can't use TTL and set the flash manually at the same time. i believe that if you have the camera set to use TTL, then your flash will use TTL. To use the manual settings on the flash, you set the camera's flash setting to manual, then change the settings on the flash.

For exposure compensation, my D800 manual says that you can use either the regular exposure compensation, the flash exposure compensation, or both. If you use both, the compensation is additive. The main difference is that the flash exposure compensation affects how bright the subject is relative to the background, where the regular camera exposure compensation affects the scene as a whole, including the background. In practical terms, this doesn't mean much unless you're trying to mix flash and ambient. You'd adjust the ambient using the regular exposure compensation, then adjust the brightness of the flash using flash compensation.
01/02/2015 10:23:07 PM · #3
you can do what the old press guys did for fashion/people shots -1stop on camera +1stop on flash, makes some interesting shots
01/03/2015 06:38:41 AM · #4
So, if i understand correctly, the regular exposure compensation influences both the ambient and flash exposure metering. If both exposure compensations add to each other, the suggested -EV on EC and +1 on FEC would result in properly exposed flash and underexposed ambient, right?
01/03/2015 10:30:41 AM · #5
Yes. Or you could just try it and see what happens.
01/03/2015 07:40:16 PM · #6
Originally posted by damjanev:

Anyone has any firsthand experience on this subject?
Consider a simple scenario with an on-camera external flash in TTL mode. There are 3 places where compensation can be adjusted: standard camera exposure compensation, in-camera flash exposure compensation, exposure compensation on the flash itself. What happens when you combine these setting?


As you are talking Nikon Speedlight this is quite simple :)

Fist, as said before, you must be in TTL, wired (with the flash on top of the camera) or wireless (wireless TTL). Putting this to the side you have two compensations you can do, not 3 as you mention. EV compensation (read exposure compensation). You change this trough your camera exposure compensation, and as it is based on camera exposure it will afect both the general exposure and flash output. The other is FV compensation (flash compensation) and can be done on the flash or on the camera, but it is the same. This will only afect the flash power output, not the general exposure.

In practical this is not a big deal if you use the flash as fill flash, with very balanced exposure from the flash and ambient light. If the flash becomes your key light is a completly different matter (at night for example of if you want to try different efects).

It also depends how you are metering the light. A lot of people don't realize that if they use by any reason (backlight portrait for example) spot metering to meter light the flash/camera will stop working in TTL BL (balanced TTl where the camera can differenciate between fill flash and ambient exposure) and become pure TTL and thinks you're flash is your key light.
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