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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Unsharp Mask
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Showing posts 1 - 19 of 19, (reverse)
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06/11/2014 07:44:10 AM · #1
Am I the only one who doesn't and has possibly never used it?

please enlighten me as to what I'm missing...
06/11/2014 07:53:46 AM · #2
Originally posted by Mike:

Am I the only one who doesn't and has possibly never used it?


Yep!

Originally posted by Mike:

please enlighten me as to what I'm missing...


A basic editing process!
06/11/2014 07:59:27 AM · #3
i usually sharpen in lightroom am i still missing anything?
06/11/2014 08:03:44 AM · #4
Originally posted by Mike:

Am I the only one who doesn't and has possibly never used it?

please enlighten me as to what I'm missing...


DPC Tutorial
06/11/2014 08:17:42 AM · #5
that tutorial makes me want to not use it.
06/11/2014 08:23:41 AM · #6
I agree with Mike. I find there are sharpening tools that FAR better meet my needs than unsharp mask.
06/11/2014 08:36:00 AM · #7
Is this just a legacy technique that people still use? i read posts in other forums where people use unsharp mask. Maybe i've always used lightroom where i have 4 sliders to control my sharpening nondestructively, and being that i use LR AND photoshop in combination, ive never sharpened in PS.
06/11/2014 08:36:50 AM · #8
It's a matter of preference. I stopped using it about four years and haven't looked back. My Sigma cameras deliver sharp images out of camera, and I've never felt that they needed the artificial look (to my eyes) of an unsharp mask. Even so, I don't use any tools that are USM capable. I only process in the raw editor.

06/11/2014 08:51:03 AM · #9
Mike, I think that there is still "room in the toolbox" for USM, however I too do almost all of my sharpening in Lr. When we resize substantially as we do for DPC, however, some intelligent combination of resizing and sharpening can greatly enhance detail without ugly artifacts.
06/11/2014 08:52:14 AM · #10
Originally posted by Mike:

i usually sharpen in lightroom am i still missing anything?


I sharpen in Lr (lightly), then again in PsCC...I don't usually use USM unless it's a very detailed (not busy) picture and that's after I've done my downsizing, it's my last step...and it's ever so slight...just enough so you can see a little difference in your photo...

I have also always sharpened in both....

Message edited by author 2014-06-11 08:53:27.
06/11/2014 09:32:38 AM · #11
the thing i love about the LR sharpening is the masking slider and the ability to see (pressing ALT) what you are actually sharpening.
06/11/2014 09:43:55 AM · #12
Originally posted by Mike:

the thing i love about the LR sharpening is the masking slider and the ability to see (pressing ALT) what you are actually sharpening.


Yes it's a fabulous tool...have you ever tried High Pass Filter? Applied right it really makes things pop without haloing or crisping things up
06/11/2014 09:47:49 AM · #13
For printing, I presharpen in Lightroom and do outpot sharpening with Sharpener Pro. For web, especially at DPC sizes, I use several techniques, depending on the image. For some images, a careful unsharp mask gives a cleaner, less artifact laden pop that I can't get another way.
06/11/2014 09:48:11 AM · #14
I think that sharpening tools, either USM in Photoshop and LR sharpening are really necessary to make detail and texture to really pop up. If you're comfortable with the results in LR there's no need to use anything else. I'm not a big fan of LR myself, so I use USM in PS and also for really textured photos I use the High Pass technique, which sharpens the photo without the haloing effect that you sometimes get with the USM tool.
06/11/2014 10:14:35 AM · #15
I'm missing LR. A little message pops up saying 'error' etc. although I can't remember what else... I guess I should be telling mr and mrs Adobe about this and not dpc ...
06/11/2014 12:59:59 PM · #16
Originally posted by Mike:

Is this just a legacy technique that people still use?

Those of us who don't use Lightroom certainly do. Besides, what makes you think that your groovy sliders aren't just another pretty (inter)face performing the same basic functions as USM invisibly (to you)?

I actually use USM in two different ways: for detail sharpening and "high-radius USM" which is useful for improving the contrast in photos (such as some landscapes) which have relatively flat light.

With the USM interface you have control over all of the variables: what color difference defines an "edge", how big an effect you want, and how strongly you want it applied.
06/11/2014 01:15:59 PM · #17
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by Mike:

Is this just a legacy technique that people still use?

Those of us who don't use Lightroom certainly do. Besides, what makes you think that your groovy sliders aren't just another pretty (inter)face performing the same basic functions as USM invisibly (to you)?

I actually use USM in two different ways: for detail sharpening and "high-radius USM" which is useful for improving the contrast in photos (such as some landscapes) which have relatively flat light.

With the USM interface you have control over all of the variables: what color difference defines an "edge", how big an effect you want, and how strongly you want it applied.


good points.

my sharpening is non destructive, is your :P
06/11/2014 01:23:51 PM · #18
Originally posted by Mike:


good points.

my sharpening is non destructive, is your :P


At some point, I cease caring whether it is non-destructive or not, specifically during/after resizing to "web resolution." But FWIW, even USM applied in Ps can be non-destructive, if applied as a Smart Filter to a Smart Object.
06/11/2014 01:30:01 PM · #19
Originally posted by Mike:

my sharpening is non destructive, is your :P

No, not in the same way Adjustment Layers are, but I'm mostly using a very old version, the new versions probably can do that. However, I'm always doing the sharpening on a composited TUFF file, not the original Photoshop file with all the editing, so I can always make another copy (or use the Revert command) if I make a mistake.

I think it's possible to apply it selectively to individual color channels, and of course you can apply it to parts of the image using regular masks/selections/alpha channels (all the same thing!).

I'll try to post an example of the high-radius technique later.

Do you know exactly what the USM filter is actually doing? Understanding how it works makes the settings interface make more sense ...
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