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04/07/2014 03:50:21 PM · #1
Hey there! I've been on DPC for just a short time thanks to a little push from my friend Janine and I am super hooked! :). So nice to meet ya'll!

I am looking for some advice on upgrading my camera. I currently have Canon 350D Rebel XT which has been wonderful to learn on but would like to move on to newer model with more functionality.

I picked up a camera about two years ago and haven't been able to put it down since. I moved from a regular digital camera and my phone camera to a Powershot SX40 then to the Rebel XT that I am currently using. I am self taught and continue to learn through tutorials and the internet (also my friend).

My passion is in birds and nature, and the great outdoors. I am looking for more in-camera functions, high ISO, speed, easy to use... I am attempting to stay in the $1,000 range. Any advice on what I should look at next?

I was looking into the Canon T5i however I am being told that I may have already surpassed this camera and may want to look at the 60D. I have looked into and read reviews and attempting to figure out the differences between each.

Any advice would be much appreciated!

04/07/2014 04:18:31 PM · #2
The 60D would be, IMO, a very good choice. It will provide the added functionality you need to grow in your skills, and it is still and APS-C (crop-sensor) body, which fits well with your wildlife interest. You could move into the 60D body very economically by buying a Canon-refurbished unit. Canon now offers a full 1-year warranty on their refurbished SLR bodies, and I do not hesitate to recommend this path to anyone looking to save some money. Your next step, then would be to look at what lenses might assist you in achieving your photographic goals.

Edit: Oh, and welcome to the insane asylum!

Message edited by author 2014-04-07 16:19:18.
04/07/2014 04:23:00 PM · #3
Hi Kim!!

I'm wendy, and I was the one telling Janine to tell you that you should skip the t5i and go to the prosumer line: 60d. 70d or 7d. Whatever you willing to spend.

The consumer line t5i, rebels, etc, are wonderful cameras, but I don't think they compare to the others, acoorsing to the reviews I've read. You've got a newer sensor on the t5i, but reviews say that the 60d or others have a better dynamic range. Usually more frames per second on burst shooting ( which is AAWESOME for wildlife actions shots), the build quality seems to be better (better weather proofing, which for more serious photographers is important. We'll go out and shoot in the rain. People who aren't as serious avoid those situations. :)

I currently have the 7d. I'm not happy with the noise, but everything else is awesome.

But I loved my 40d, so the 60d or 70d should both be incredible cameras.
04/07/2014 04:58:03 PM · #4
My suggestion is go to Colonial Photo n Hobby...see feel touch...plus listen to all these wonderful people...I don't know enough about Canon to be of much help...but there are sooo many on here that do!!! They will do a fine job of guiding you...
04/07/2014 05:16:34 PM · #5
one downfall of the 60D is it will NOT auto focus while recording video. I did not know that at first and I totally had a super blurry video of a black bear sow and cub climbing a tree :( .I used the 60D for over a year until it drowned to death :( Both the 70D and T5i will do auto focus while recording video. I have both the 70D and T5i now,the T5i is a second body when Im out looking for critters or what not, that way I can easily switch from critter mode to landscape mode in about 2 seconds.
But I do feel the 70D will be a better choice as it has a better auto focus system and more focus points than the T5i.
04/07/2014 09:59:39 PM · #6
Originally posted by kirbic:

The 60D would be, IMO, a very good choice. It will provide the added functionality you need to grow in your skills, and it is still and APS-C (crop-sensor) body, which fits well with your wildlife interest. You could move into the 60D body very economically by buying a Canon-refurbished unit. Canon now offers a full 1-year warranty on their refurbished SLR bodies, and I do not hesitate to recommend this path to anyone looking to save some money. Your next step, then would be to look at what lenses might assist you in achieving your photographic goals.

Edit: Oh, and welcome to the insane asylum!


Yup. Kirbic pretty much summed it up, as well as everybody else. The features of the XXd series are VASTLY better than the rebels, and your focus will be WAY better as well. If you want to upgrade, don't go hopping from rebel to rebel (Canon puts out several different models a year, I swear...), you'll never get anywhere. Jump up a tier in quality. You'll have more options, more FPS, better AF, a more rugged camera, it will balance better with large lenses (necessary for wildlife)... the reasons go on and on.

ETA: And yes, don't underestimate Janine's suggestion to handle them in person. That's huge. I went with Nikon over Canon initially because of how much better my hands fit on the D300 vs the 40D. And yes, the xxd series will be bigger than the rebels, but overall I find that to be beneficial unless you're trying to minimize your kit size (which would enter us into a totally different series of suggestions).

Message edited by author 2014-04-07 22:01:39.
04/07/2014 10:45:31 PM · #7
Welcome to the madhouse! You are embarking on an exciting adventure, and endless gear greed :)

One thing you might want to consider when buying glass, if there is ANY possibility you might move to a full frame body, is to buy full frame lenses. You will avoid the expense of having to repurchase everything. But I'll let the more tech-savvy members pipe in on this.
04/07/2014 11:37:15 PM · #8
Originally posted by tanguera:

Welcome to the madhouse! You are embarking on an exciting adventure, and endless gear greed :)

One thing you might want to consider when buying glass, if there is ANY possibility you might move to a full frame body, is to buy full frame lenses. You will avoid the expense of having to repurchase everything. But I'll let the more tech-savvy members pipe in on this.


Very valid point, but if her preferred subject matter is birds and nature, she'll likely be sticking to the tele end with maybe an UWA (ultra wide angle) and the crop sensor will benefit her (minus in low light scenarios).

Birding requires very long lenses, so the crop factor will be hugely beneficial for you as you can avoid buying the REALLY expensive teles (Canon 500mm F4 by continuing to use a crop sensor.
04/07/2014 11:53:55 PM · #9
I buy cheap stuff, so that I won't freak out (at least not too much) when I drop it from a fast moving bicycle or it gets stolen from my truck. I guess what works for me really doesn't apply here...
04/08/2014 07:58:19 AM · #10
Originally posted by tanguera:

Welcome to the madhouse! You are embarking on an exciting adventure, and endless gear greed :)

One thing you might want to consider when buying glass, if there is ANY possibility you might move to a full frame body, is to buy full frame lenses. You will avoid the expense of having to repurchase everything. But I'll let the more tech-savvy members pipe in on this.


first welcome!

IMO, I wouldn't worry about lenses i may use in the future with a different body, it is way to easy to sell a lens when you don't need it any longer and recover quite a bit of the original cost, bodies depreciate way faster than lenses. In fact you could buy used lenses and practically "rent" them forever, buy buying and selling, losing only shipping and wire (paypal) costs.

Back to the body, you really have 3 choices to look at the 60 and 70D or 7D. the 60D will give you best bargain, the 70D will be newer than the 60D but in all honestly the only real practical improvements over the 60D are in realm of live view and video autofocus if you don't shoot a lot of video or rely on live view AF i'd opt for the cheaper 60D as they share the same features and sensor. The third option is the 7D, its still a crop despite the single digit model number and its due to be replaced with the newer model soon. Its autofocus system and burst rates are far superior to the 60 or 70D with respect to subjects that move quickly. In fact i know many a portrait photog who up until the 5d mark3 came out preferred the 7D for shooting children over the full frame 5d mark2.

Sooo in my nonprofessional opinion, if i were you i'd think hard about how peppy my autofocus needs to be for your subjects and choose either the 7D if its still within your budget or go for the 60D.
04/08/2014 11:29:13 AM · #11
I purchased a Canon 60D in late February / early March of this year. I am very pleased with the camera. I knew the video didn't auto focus but I learning how to take video with the manual focus mode and it's not to hard. As far as the camera photo quality and features it's great for the price range. I lucked up and got it on sale for $899 for the body and 18-135 IS Lens. The biggest savings was the Canon 70-300mm IS USM Lens. Regular price was over $600 but by purchasing it with the 60D I got it for $274.
04/08/2014 12:00:35 PM · #12
You guys are great! I have read review after review and was feeling very confused! Thank you all so much for the great advice and the welcome, I have my own white jacket so think I may fit in! Haha!

It sounds like the Canon 60D is probably my best bet. I want to be out in all types of weather getting the great wildlife action shot as Wendy put it! I have not been really interested in the video but may use it at some point. The 7D may be a little over my budget. Especially since I want to look into lenses next.

I totally get the idea behind the quality difference from the Rebels to the 60d, 70d, etc... I don't want to go hopping, would like to get a body that I will stick with for a while. I will take the advice also and go to the store and get a feel for them.

I would like to find out more about the deal with the lens you found SDW?

04/08/2014 12:15:38 PM · #13
Buy the one that says "Nikon" on the front. ; )

Battle royale, bring it canonites.
04/08/2014 12:16:34 PM · #14
One note here: The Canon 6D isn't crazy out of budget (yes, it's $1500 or so, but that's not crazy)..

Take a look at a full resolution sample from the 6D and consider the quality of that before you go up. The only downside is that you'd also need to get a new lens, probably a 50mm f/1.8 (the 'nifty fifty' - usually around $100)

I don't know how you feel about spending more, but you say that you don't want to upgrade... Well, trust me, get the 60D, and you'll want to upgrade to a full frame, it's really only a matter of time before that bug bites... Skip the whole thing, short circuit it and just go FF now before you've invested heavily in crop sensor lenses, etc. (not that you can't get EF lenses, it's just that there are so many tempting EF-s lenses)..

.. Maybe it's just not doable, but I think the benefits of just going all-in outweighs the initial (painful!) costs. You could even get a 6D kit with a very nice lens for just under $2000

Message edited by author 2014-04-08 12:19:46.
04/08/2014 12:17:42 PM · #15
Oh I have already been in the middle of that one with my friend Janine! It would be beneficial for me to go with a Nikon as she is so much help to me, however I have had Canon's all along.
04/08/2014 01:03:59 PM · #16
Originally posted by Cory:

One note here: The Canon 6D isn't crazy out of budget (yes, it's $1500 or so, but that's not crazy)..

Take a look at a full resolution sample from the 6D and consider the quality of that before you go up. The only downside is that you'd also need to get a new lens, probably a 50mm f/1.8 (the 'nifty fifty' - usually around $100)

I don't know how you feel about spending more, but you say that you don't want to upgrade... Well, trust me, get the 60D, and you'll want to upgrade to a full frame, it's really only a matter of time before that bug bites... Skip the whole thing, short circuit it and just go FF now before you've invested heavily in crop sensor lenses, etc. (not that you can't get EF lenses, it's just that there are so many tempting EF-s lenses)..

.. Maybe it's just not doable, but I think the benefits of just going all-in outweighs the initial (painful!) costs. You could even get a 6D kit with a very nice lens for just under $2000


i disagree. yeah its full frame, but she's losing the crop factor that is often beneficial to wildlife and to be fair, my canon 60D with a 10-22 compared with the 5d2 and a 17-40 for landscape. i could never tell the difference. Now with portraits, its night and day, the 5d2 just destroys the 60D but with landscape its an even comparison.
04/08/2014 01:04:49 PM · #17
Originally posted by chazoe:

Buy the one that says "Nikon" on the front. ; )

Battle royale, bring it canonites.


when you go to battle you don't bring a Nikon, you bring a CANON.
04/08/2014 01:30:58 PM · #18
Originally posted by Mike:

to be fair, my canon 60D with a 10-22 compared with the 5d2 and a 17-40 for landscape. i could never tell the difference.

10-22 APS-C, quality-wise, rates very well against the 17-40mm. But the 16-35mm f/2.8L, now THAT'S a lens :-)
04/08/2014 01:32:41 PM · #19
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by Mike:

to be fair, my canon 60D with a 10-22 compared with the 5d2 and a 17-40 for landscape. i could never tell the difference.

10-22 APS-C, quality-wise, rates very well against the 17-40mm. But the 16-35mm f/2.8L, now THAT'S a lens :-)


it better be at twice the cost. :)

Message edited by author 2014-04-08 13:32:50.
04/08/2014 01:33:38 PM · #20
Originally posted by Mike:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by Mike:

to be fair, my canon 60D with a 10-22 compared with the 5d2 and a 17-40 for landscape. i could never tell the difference.

10-22 APS-C, quality-wise, rates very well against the 17-40mm. But the 16-35mm f/2.8L, now THAT'S a lens :-)


it better be at twice the cost. :)

You got it ;-)
04/08/2014 02:03:07 PM · #21
Ok so I should consider looking at full frame or not?

Message edited by author 2014-04-08 14:05:10.
04/08/2014 02:04:42 PM · #22
Originally posted by KMcC:

Ok so I should consider the looking at full frame or not?

Not. No need for it in your case. MUCH more expensive.
04/08/2014 02:24:13 PM · #23
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by KMcC:

Ok so I should consider the looking at full frame or not?

Not. No need for it in your case. MUCH more expensive.


MUCH, is right.

if your forte were portraits we'd be singing a different tune will Full frame

Message edited by author 2014-04-08 14:29:01.
04/08/2014 02:38:15 PM · #24
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by KMcC:

Ok so I should consider the looking at full frame or not?

Not. No need for it in your case. MUCH more expensive.


Totally agree...not now...save for the beautiful 150-600mm Tameron ...

And when your done with my straight jacket...I need it back...lol
04/08/2014 02:43:45 PM · #25
Tony Northrup has a very practical, user oriented review of the Canon lineup. A completely different angle than the usual DPReview tests. Check it out.

As a Nikon user, I'm not sure why I watched some of this--it may have been his beautiful model/wife Chelsea ;)

//www.facebook.com/NorthrupPhotography/posts/125408844313993
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