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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Looking to round off my lens collection
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01/20/2014 07:13:42 PM · #1
So I currently have a Canon T3i Rebel and a 24-105mm f/4.0L

Really happy with this combination, but it has a couple limitations I need to address. First is the wide end, and I'm about 98% set on getting the EF-S 10-22.

Low light/Indoor use is the second limitation, and this is where I'm less sure. Initially after my nifty 50 broke I planned to get the 50mm f/1.4, but it's a little too much zoom indoors. This got me looking at the 35mm f/1.4L, which is quite a bit more than I want to spend.

Which lands me on the 35mm f/2 IS USM. Being a newer lens (I can't even find it in the DPChallenge Equipment section) There's not a lot of info, though reviews seem very positive. This would mostly be used for indoor family events (birthdays, thanksgiving etc) with the occasional full/half body portrait. So, will the 35 f/2 fit my needs? Will f/2 be fast enough for indoor use without a flash? Or is there something else I should be considering?
01/20/2014 08:24:56 PM · #2
Being faced with the dilemma about a fast semi-wide lens I actually did something a bit more crazy - I just bought a Fuji X100s... 23mm f/2 (35mm equivalent) and it's awesome... The original x100 should be cheap enough to be very competitive with the price of that 35mm IS. (Plus it really is an amazing camera)

The EF-s 10-22 is a great lens, no reason to not go that way - although the Tamron does get good reviews, I used Yo_Spiff's copy, and I was very pleased with the results, but I do think the 10-22 is superior in terms of IQ and build quality.

As for the lens/X100 choice, I think a second small body will be far more useful, especially for family type stuff as you seem to intend to use it. (there's other benefits to the X100 series like the leaf-shutter and x-trans sensor in the X100s, but for your purposes I'd be more interested in the fact that it's a backup body, with great IQ, lightweight and discrete.)

Just my advice, and I'm biased since I bought one. :D
01/20/2014 09:20:42 PM · #3
Look to the new Sigma Art lenses. They are getting wildly great reviews, especially for the price. The Sigma 35 1.4 is only $900 compared to the Canon version of the lens for over $1300. IT's on my short list of lenses to get.
01/21/2014 12:01:34 AM · #4
The 10-22 is da bomb on a crop body... just do it.

The fast lens is hard but the 35f2 is a very decent lens for the money and f2 is fast enough in most cases - keep in mind that dof is thin as well and focus is usually an issue. A lot of people will find the 50 too long on a crop for indoor use unless you have some space. I agree Sigma's are very interesting recently.
01/21/2014 01:43:47 AM · #5
hmm, some things to think about.

The Fuji, looks like a great camera. Some really nice pics with that, but I think if I were to spend that much for another body I'd have to get a full frame.

Sigma looks pretty good too, but $300 more than the f/2 IS USM. Gain build quality and 1.4, but lose IS and $300. Being as the f/2 is already almost double what I was expecting to pay, by getting the 50mm 1.4 that's a tough sale. And the IS if I decide to shoot video would come in handy. Think I'm still leaning towards the Canon.

The only thing holding me back on the 10-22 is I eventually want a full frame body. And why I opted for the 24-105 instead of the 17-55 f/2.8. But that's still at least a couple years away, and I REALLY want something wide to shoot landscapes, so I'm pretty much sold on that. And it's only $520 for a refurb.
01/21/2014 02:04:53 AM · #6
I can't speak for any of the 35s but I will vouch for the 10-22. It's a fantastic lens.
01/21/2014 05:40:45 AM · #7
The 10-22 is a great lens, no regrets buying that one. I will also say that the EF 70-200 is a must have. Preferably the f2.8 but the f4 to start has been nice. I am looking to upgrade this year myself.
01/21/2014 06:39:45 AM · #8
Originally posted by kleski:

The 10-22 is a great lens, no regrets buying that one. I will also say that the EF 70-200 is a must have. Preferably the f2.8 but the f4 to start has been nice. I am looking to upgrade this year myself.


Yeah, that's been on my want list for a while now. I rented the 2.8 IS version a while back and liked it. But it would be the least used of the 3, and the other 2 are already pushing the limit financially, so it'll have to wait.
01/21/2014 08:51:17 AM · #9
if you are looking for low light indoor do go any wider than 35 on a crop, 50 is too tight from my experience.

the 10-22 is a fantastic lens and honestly at 10mm you could realistically handhold to 1/20s steady. if you want i'll show you some i shot a 1/10 in abysmal light at high ISO on a 60D. Full frame is the way to go with low light, especially a 6D where it can even focus at -3ev)

if you are interested, i may be selling my 28/1.8 to get a 24-105L or go back to a 17-40L

01/21/2014 10:10:37 AM · #10
I'm not sure why people always limit their lens choices because they're planning on "going to full frame", especially if price is an issue. Crop lenses, especially used ones, are cheaper and lighter, and there are some very fine used ones out there for really reasonable prices. Buy a used lens, then resell it for what you paid if you ever go to full frame.

Anyway, after that rant, if the Sigma and Cory's x100s (both excellent suggestions, btw) are both too expensive, I'd buy Mike's 28 and be done with it. It's in your price range, 28 is a useful focal length for indoor shooting with either crop or full frame, and f/1.8 is not much slower than the 1.4's you've been looking at. On a crop camera, I'd want something a bit wider than 35 for indoor shots.
01/21/2014 02:03:38 PM · #11
Originally posted by bmatt17:

Sigma looks pretty good too, but $300 more than the f/2 IS USM.

Keep in mind that there is a Canon 35f2 NON IS.... I had assumed that's the one you're talking about. The IS is quite a step up in price. The non IS is a great little lens..... not in the L class but good by most standards and compared well to the 50f1.8 you mention while getting wider for a crop body.

As mentioned there are a pair of 28mm also..... but after the initial drop in price the IS is not that much more. The non IS is reported to be a great lens but I have neither to common on.
01/21/2014 04:38:38 PM · #12
I really like my 28MM f1.8

I found it was the "sweet spot" for indoor portraits with a crop sensor.
01/21/2014 05:59:58 PM · #13
I hadn't considered the 28mm. Since it'll still be a couple weeks before I'm ready to buy, I'm going to use my 24-105 and flash, to take random snaps around the house, see whether I like 35mm or 28mm better.

Is there an easy way to lock the focal length? Mine tends to creep slightly, especially if aimed down at all.
01/21/2014 09:05:02 PM · #14
Originally posted by bmatt17:

I hadn't considered the 28mm. Since it'll still be a couple weeks before I'm ready to buy, I'm going to use my 24-105 and flash, to take random snaps around the house, see whether I like 35mm or 28mm better.

Is there an easy way to lock the focal length? Mine tends to creep slightly, especially if aimed down at all.


Gaffer tape. It sounds like I'm being facetious, but I'm not...
01/21/2014 10:12:18 PM · #15
Originally posted by Ann:

Originally posted by bmatt17:

I hadn't considered the 28mm. Since it'll still be a couple weeks before I'm ready to buy, I'm going to use my 24-105 and flash, to take random snaps around the house, see whether I like 35mm or 28mm better.

Is there an easy way to lock the focal length? Mine tends to creep slightly, especially if aimed down at all.


Gaffer tape. It sounds like I'm being facetious, but I'm not...


Used it too. My daughter had to make an animation so tripod with camera vertical lens facing down. New lens but we had to take 800+ pics so it would creep down. Gaffer tape and problem fixed.
01/22/2014 09:15:29 AM · #16
Don't discount the sigma 10-22, I've never used one but its only about $300 used and by all accounts its not the canon but its not like its that far from being a really good lens for half the price.

For landscape you are going to be stopping down most likely which will sharpen your lens up considerably. I'd bet you'd be hard pressed to spot the difference in image quality, color rendition and flare control might be the differentiation

01/22/2014 11:50:57 AM · #17
The Tokina 12-24 is another one that has great IQ and is a great bargain if you can find a used one.

There are a lot of very good crop sensor ultra-wides on the used market for good prices. Anytime someone goes to full frame, they have one of these to sell. Don't be the guy who buys one brand new then has to sell it at a loss. Be the guy who picks up a good deal on someone else's loss.
01/22/2014 12:33:01 PM · #18
Go with the canon 10-22. It's an incredibly awesome lens. The sigmas, tamrons, and tokinas are actually quite nice, but canon lenses do seem to work best, focus fastest, on the canon cameras. I've purchased other non-canon lenses, but the 10-22 is one where I wouldn't consider anything else. It is really a wonderful lens.

It's considered one of the professional lenses by canon, btw.
01/22/2014 03:38:20 PM · #19
Originally posted by Ann:

The Tokina 12-24 is another one that has great IQ and is a great bargain if you can find a used one.



that only downfall to this lens is it flares very easily compared to the canon, something that may or may not be beneficial, depending on your subject. and it only goes to 12mm...
01/22/2014 05:27:30 PM · #20
Originally posted by Mike:

Originally posted by Ann:

The Tokina 12-24 is another one that has great IQ and is a great bargain if you can find a used one.



that only downfall to this lens is it flares very easily compared to the canon, something that may or may not be beneficial, depending on your subject. and it only goes to 12mm...


The downsides of each lens:

Tokina - Some flare resistance problems. Doesn't go to the holy grail of 10mm. I had this lens and never found either to be a problem, but some people on the internets apparently did.

Sigma - Some quality control problems. If you can check the lens out before buying, this is mitigated.

Canon - $200 more expensive in the present market ($300ish for Sigma and Tokina, $500ish for used Canon)

Otherwise, all 3 are great lenses.

There's also a Tokina 11-16, which is bigger, heavier, f/2.8, and is priced in the middle (roughly $400 used). By all accounts it's very nice, though I haven't tried it.

Honestly, if you can't take amazing pictures with any of these, it's not the lens' fault. Personally, I would shop based on price and availability of used copies.
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