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DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> Please help, I can't get extension tubes to work.
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Showing posts 1 - 14 of 14, (reverse)
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09/19/2013 08:36:44 PM · #1
Hey all, I just bought some extension tubes for my canon 24-105 1:4 L lens and I can't seem to get them to work. Maybe I am just an idiot but I can't get them to focus on anything. Keep in mind I have never used extension tubes and I have never seen anyone else use them. So I'm hoping I am just doing something wrong and didn't get a dud. They aren't the most expensive set but I did pay $60 for them and I would like them to work. They are Pro series Auto Focus Macro extension Tube set, they come with 13mm 21mm and 31mm tubes. I've tried them all separately and in different combinations. The only time I could even sort of get one to work is when I used the 31mm all by itself and got in really close (like my lens almost touching the subject) I also tried to manual focus with no luck either. Help!! what am I doing wrong, I was really hoping to test them out today.
09/19/2013 08:39:30 PM · #2
I'm a little confused why you're using extension tubes with the 24-105... usually you'd use them with a macro lens...
09/19/2013 08:44:20 PM · #3
I thought extension tubes turn non macro lenses into macro lenses. maybe I am wrong.

Message edited by author 2013-09-19 20:46:21.
09/19/2013 08:47:12 PM · #4
thats not true Wendy, you can use extension tubes on any lens but they only work within certain focal lengths. You will probably only get focus within the 50-105 range of that lens Jennifer and chances are depending on the ones you bought it may not autofocus. Either slide the camera or subject back and forth until you can see something start to focus.



Message edited by author 2013-09-19 20:47:54.
09/19/2013 08:49:20 PM · #5
Depending on the tube length, you will lose the ability to focus at certain focal lengths. Typically, first try to put your zoom at 105mm, then focus on something relatively close. It should work: I am using a 25mm tube on a 70-200mm zoom without much trouble.
09/19/2013 08:49:21 PM · #6
Originally posted by Damon:

thats not true Wendy, you can use extension tubes on any lens but they only work within certain focal lengths. You will probably only get focus within the 50-105 range of that lens Jennifer and chances are depending on the ones you bought it may not autofocus. Either slide the camera or subject back and forth until you can see something start to focus.


They are suppose to be autofocus. Maybe I just need to try it in the 50-105 range and see if that works.
09/19/2013 08:50:16 PM · #7
Originally posted by gyaban:

Depending on the tube length, you will lose the ability to focus at certain focal lengths. Typically, first try to put your zoom at 105mm, then focus on something relatively close. It should work: I am using a 25mm tube on a 70-200mm zoom without much trouble.


Thanks I am going to try it at 105 and see if that works.
09/19/2013 08:53:51 PM · #8
Originally posted by sjhuls:

Originally posted by gyaban:

Depending on the tube length, you will lose the ability to focus at certain focal lengths. Typically, first try to put your zoom at 105mm, then focus on something relatively close. It should work: I am using a 25mm tube on a 70-200mm zoom without much trouble.


Thanks I am going to try it at 105 and see if that works.


Yep that was it, Thanks! Now I am going to go have a little fun outside before the sun goes down.
09/19/2013 09:00:41 PM · #9
My extension tubes are also autofocus ones, but I find I usually have to use manual focus.

The wider your focal length, the closer your lens needs to be to the subject. I once tried using mine with my Sigma 10-20mm lens, and at 10mm it's impossible to get anything in focus, even if it's touching the lens. I've settled for combining them with my 18-55mm kit lens because I've found that I get better magnification with that than with a longer focal length.
09/19/2013 09:33:25 PM · #10
Extension tubes don't usually play well with wide angle lenses because even the short ones will bring the entire range of focus inside the lens. If you're lucky, infinity will have the dust on the front element in focus.

I don't feel like going through the math, because in all likelihood, no one really cares, but you can google it if you're curious.

Generally stick with longer focal length lenses for use with extension tubes and you'll be fine.

Message edited by author 2013-09-19 21:34:18.
12/06/2013 02:42:42 AM · #11
Hi

I only saw this now.
In case you are still struggling, make sure to attach the extension tubes to the camera before putting the lens onto the tubes. For some reason the autofocus won't work if you put the tubes onto the lens and the whole thing onto the camera.

I love my extension tubes. They are also autofocus but most of the time I do focus manually to get a (better) result. And yes, the distance to the object can become very, very tight making lighting a challenge sometimes.

Regards
gaby
12/06/2013 10:07:02 AM · #12
Originally posted by sjhuls:

Originally posted by sjhuls:

Originally posted by gyaban:

Depending on the tube length, you will lose the ability to focus at certain focal lengths. Typically, first try to put your zoom at 105mm, then focus on something relatively close. It should work: I am using a 25mm tube on a 70-200mm zoom without much trouble.


Thanks I am going to try it at 105 and see if that works.


Yep that was it, Thanks! Now I am going to go have a little fun outside before the sun goes down.


lets see some results when you get a chance!
12/06/2013 12:13:33 PM · #13
Your 50/1.8 would be ideal for them if you want to shoot at close range. The shorter tubes, probably the shortest one, should work good with the 50.
So far for me, the most useful combos are 12mm tube & 35mm lens, and the mid length tube with 85mm. I use older "all manual everything" lenses and they work great with the Nikon.
The long tube or a combination of two are useful on a telephoto for shooting bugs, butterflies and other skittish small critters from a comfortable distance.
If you are new to macro shooting, you will be surprised by how much things move around in the viewfinder. Some kind of camera stability will help a lot. I use a monopod if I am on the move shooting flowers ect.
Focal distances are generally so short that it may be easier to switch to manual focus, then move in or out with the camera until the part of the subject you want is in focus.

Message edited by author 2013-12-06 12:18:37.
12/06/2013 01:31:57 PM · #14
Originally posted by MelonMusketeer:

Focal distances are generally so short that it may be easier to switch to manual focus, then move in or out with the camera until the part of the subject you want is in focus.

I think this is good advice for any kind of macro/close-up shooting. I find the same thing when I'm shooting close-ups using a telephoto lens/long zoom setting from as close as I can get; I use this for a lot of my flower shots.
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