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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> ...Which camera should I buy?
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12/16/2012 12:54:22 AM · #1
I am determined to save up my money and buy myself a better DSLR camera. I currently own a Sony Alpha-A390, but I've had it for two years now and I feel like I need to acquire less entry-level equipment (camera & lenses) as I am becoming more interested as pursuing photography on a more professional level. I am having troubles with the noise levels in my photos, minimal aperture options, and problems focusing correctly resulting in an unclear or blurry photo. The camera also randomly shuts down and does not turn back on until I put another battery in (which sometimes I only have one available).

Anyways, since you know my situation, I need your advice...
I have looked up several cameras under $1000, including:

~Canon EOS-550D t2i Rebel
~Canon EOS-600D t3i Rebel
~Nikon D90
~Nikon D3200
~Nikon D5100
~Nikon D7000
...and a camera I LOVE, which is a little over budget: ~Canon EOS-7D

I find that all of these cameras have excellent image quality, and every single camera passes up my Sony by a long shot. I have read very good reviews about these cameras as well, I just don't know which one to go for. I have never owned a Nikon nor a Canon, but realize they have great reputations for their DSLR cameras. I enjoy photographing landscapes, macro, wildlife, and especially portraits!

IF ANYONE HAS ANY SUGGESTIONS OR OWNS ONE OF THESE CAMERAS, PLEASE LET ME KNOW HOW IT IS. I DO NOT KNOW WHICH ONE IS THE BEST WITHOUT YOUR INPUT.

Thank you for taking time to read this, and thank you in advance for commenting! :)
--Alina Naismith
12/16/2012 12:59:44 AM · #2
Originally posted by blueblossom11:

I enjoy photographing landscapes, macro, wildlife, and especially portraits!

If you are reasonably happy with any of the bodies you listed, it might be better for you to be looking into the price and quality of the two lines of lenses, because with that variety of subjects/interests you'll be spending way more on glass than on the camera itself.

Other than that I say go with the one which "feels right" in your hands ...
12/16/2012 01:05:16 AM · #3
Thank you for replying...
Wow, I guess I have not yet looked into the lenses of Canon or Nikon, but that is a great idea. The lens does make a big difference in the quality of the photo, as well as the type of photo (macro or portrait, for example) I will be taking.
I appreciate your suggestion, I will look into that for sure! :)
12/16/2012 01:41:53 AM · #4
I have a Nikon D90 which fits nicely into my hands. Holding them is worth a try to see how it feels.

If you get the body ($780 or so), it would be worth your while to find a good lens to go with it perhaps, like the 50mm 1.8 which is about $ 100 used or $ 220 new. It is good for portraits for one. There have been good reviews for that lens. It's very tack sharp.

Otherwise, try and get any prime lens and you won't be sorry, rather than get whatever kit lens you get with the D90

(One thing to note about this lens, is that it is not a zoom lens, so you may find yourself moving back to fit the object into the viewfinder) I do have this lens.

Message edited by author 2012-12-16 01:44:12.
12/16/2012 01:53:28 AM · #5
Thanks for replying...
So I guess I see how holding the camera would affect my photography; It has to be the right fit.
The Nikon D90 appears to be a great camera, with a lot of potential in what I want to do. I do agree on purchasing the body of the camera then separately a quality lens, thank you for that suggestion. I want super sharp and clear photos, so I will definitely check out the 50mm 1.8 Nikon lens, whether I decide to get the D90 or not.

When looking for lenses, I will most likely be purchasing two; one for distance/zoom and another lens such as the 50mm. Thank you for posting, I really appreciate your opinion. BTW -- I love your photos, they are beautiful! :)
12/16/2012 02:11:03 AM · #6
Nikon D7000 is far away better than Nikon D90 so if you can buy both,take the D7000
12/16/2012 02:11:42 AM · #7
//snapsort.com/compare/Nikon_D7000-vs-Nikon_D90
12/16/2012 04:20:26 AM · #8
I don't have any experience with most of those cameras, but I wrote this comparison between the Canon 650D and 7D a couple of months ago. Perhaps it will be of some help.
12/16/2012 05:06:41 AM · #9
D7000 is by far better (and newer) than D90. I have it and it's a great camera.

I think 7D is more or less at the same quality level of D7000. If you can get one of those it will be the best choice :)
12/16/2012 06:52:27 AM · #10
I went by cost when buying my camera. I started out with the film camera -- canon A2. I wanted the nikon. It did fit better in my hand, and I liked the nikon better, but I could afford the canon and the nikon was just a bit out of my range.

I did just fine with the canon, and I'm not sorry in the slightest.

If cost is an issue -- look at the prices of the glass and think towards the future. If one will allow you to build faster, I'd go for that.

If you're interested in wildlife, I highly recommend the canon 7D. I'm not happy with the noise levels. I'm still fighting with that. Though my 40D has excellent (and I mean really excellent) lack of noise, I never pick it up. The 7D focus zones are awesome for wildlife. The 10 frames per second is also spectacular for capturing the hard to get moving wildlife shots.

The glass is what's important. That being said -- it's a good idea to get the best camera that you can at the time, because then you can keep it for a long time and just build your glass from then on out without regretting buying low on the camera front.
12/16/2012 07:57:11 AM · #11
Here are my thoughts. If you don't want an entry level camera, don't get an entry level camera, e.g. the canon rebel line or whatever nikons considers their comparable model numbers to be.

Yes they can produce image quality on par with pricier counterparts but they don't have the other features you will most likely rely on, meaning a better control layout, better auto focusing, burst rates, flash control, etc.

two options I would recommend.

1. Buy the best body you can afford that has all the features you require, while not splurging for those you don't. For instance, look at the anon 60d and 7d. For all intents they are similar cameras. Identical sensors, pro style control layout and size. But the 7d is much more expensive mainly for its far advanced auto focus, which, unless you shoot fast action sports or wildlife such as birds, you may never need.

2. Buy the least amount of camera you need that will do what you require exceptionally. Example, A used 5d classic. Extremely durable, amazing low light ability that still holds up and exceptional image quality in portraits and landscape. You can get one for $500-$600 used. If portraits are your thing, I can't recommend full frame enough.

Whatever you budget, leave room for lenses. This is a whole other discussion. But basically avoid kit lenses for any work you consider to be serious. For instance a kit lens is fine for landscape if its just for fun, but you plan to be serious about, get good wide angle lens. Or look at primes for portraits.

Unfortunately its very expensive to cover all your bases, but their are a lot of excellent used options for bodies and lenses, great cheap lens gems, etc.

If you are serious expect to lay some serious money down, as you will need lots of gear, tripods, flashes, etc all of which are essential to excellent photography.

Don't worry, there are a myriad of users here who all use or have used different gear and can steer you in the proper direction.

12/16/2012 07:54:28 PM · #12
I am totally into my Olympus OM-D. Micro four thirds is awesome. I have my Canon 7D and I loved it until I got my Oly... I can now take the OM-D everywhere and it is small, unobtrusive and fun. I'd sell my 7D if I didn't need it for action sports.
12/16/2012 09:03:51 PM · #13
Originally posted by slickchik:

I am totally into my Olympus OM-D. Micro four thirds is awesome.

Agree. I loved mine until I broke it in a druken stupor. Only had the camera two weeks. Already ordered another one, but it's still in transit.
12/16/2012 09:06:46 PM · #14
Originally posted by slickchik:

I am totally into my Olympus OM-D. Micro four thirds is awesome. I have my Canon 7D and I loved it until I got my Oly... I can now take the OM-D everywhere and it is small, unobtrusive and fun. I'd sell my 7D if I didn't need it for action sports.


Wow, I can understand the convenience of a small camera but I can't relate to that sentiment, course I dont own one so who knows but I cant imagine it making me want to sell my 5D.....
12/16/2012 09:27:55 PM · #15
double post

Message edited by author 2012-12-16 21:28:40.
12/16/2012 09:28:08 PM · #16
Originally posted by Venser:

Originally posted by slickchik:

I am totally into my Olympus OM-D. Micro four thirds is awesome.

Agree. I loved mine until I broke it in a druken stupor. Only had the camera two weeks. Already ordered another one, but it's still in transit.


ouch.
that sucks.

this is why I never handle anything expensive when drinking. lol
12/16/2012 09:28:39 PM · #17
Originally posted by smardaz:

Originally posted by slickchik:

I am totally into my Olympus OM-D. Micro four thirds is awesome. I have my Canon 7D and I loved it until I got my Oly... I can now take the OM-D everywhere and it is small, unobtrusive and fun. I'd sell my 7D if I didn't need it for action sports.


Wow, I can understand the convenience of a small camera but I can't relate to that sentiment, course I dont own one so who knows but I cant imagine it making me want to sell my 5D.....


In a way I can relate to what 21_F.gif slickchik said. I have a bit of a love/hate relationship with my 7D. Even with just one lens I find it big and heavy to carry around, and when I do I often find I don't have the right lens for my requirements. I've recently started using an Olympus E-PL1 as my everyday carry-around camera, but I find the focus speed and image quality leave a lot to be desired. And I hate not having a viewfinder. I would love to upgrade to the Olympus OM-D EM5, but it would cost a lot to buy the camera and the lenses I really want without selling off my Canon equipment and I've yet to convince myself that it would be a wise move.
12/16/2012 11:18:44 PM · #18
Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

I would love to upgrade to the Olympus OM-D EM5, but it would cost a lot to buy the camera and the lenses I really want without selling off my Canon equipment and I've yet to convince myself that it would be a wise move.


21_F.gif ramblinr sold all of her canon gear to fund her m43 addiction :-) I won't go that far yet... But I am close. I will keep the 7D for certain applications. But I just have to say that the best camera is the one you have with you and the OM-D is almost always with me. I can put it in my purse and almost forget I have it. I can sling the camera over my shoulder and have 3 lenses in my purse and not really know they are even there. You certainly can't say that about the 7D.

I'm telling you, the OM-D is outstanding. You do have to use a different mindset when you are out but it suits me and I find I am more of a participant instead of a photographer. Hard to explain but I'm loving it.
12/16/2012 11:23:15 PM · #19
Originally posted by slickchik:

Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

I would love to upgrade to the Olympus OM-D EM5, but it would cost a lot to buy the camera and the lenses I really want without selling off my Canon equipment and I've yet to convince myself that it would be a wise move.


21_F.gif ramblinr sold all of her canon gear to fund her m43 addiction :-) I won't go that far yet... But I am close. I will keep the 7D for certain applications. But I just have to say that the best camera is the one you have with you and the OM-D is almost always with me. I can put it in my purse and almost forget I have it. I can sling the camera over my shoulder and have 3 lenses in my purse and not really know they are even there. You certainly can't say that about the 7D.

I'm telling you, the OM-D is outstanding. You do have to use a different mindset when you are out but it suits me and I find I am more of a participant instead of a photographer. Hard to explain but I'm loving it.


Ahhh, well thats the problem.....I don't have a purse!
12/16/2012 11:25:32 PM · #20
I think I am falling in love with photography all over again because of the OM-D. I love how small it is. It's a pleasure to use. I could never say that about any other small camera.

Oh, and it just looks so cool!! Maybe I just feel cool because the camera looks so retro. Whatever it is, I am sure happy... that 7D is like a brick around my neck. But the OM-D just lifts me higher...

Haha, I think I am serious ;-)
12/17/2012 05:24:54 AM · #21
Seems that micro four-thirds has hijacked this thread :)
12/17/2012 06:16:38 AM · #22
regarding her desire to go pro.... are there any profesional photographers using 4/3 day to day?

i want a OM-D to play with but cant help thinking id rather buy a new lens than another camera system and then start buying more lenses for that....

Message edited by author 2012-12-17 07:26:10.
12/17/2012 11:02:44 AM · #23
Sorry

Message edited by author 2012-12-17 11:05:52.
12/17/2012 11:05:37 AM · #24
Originally posted by Giles_uk:

... are there any profesional photographers using 4/3 day to day?


//blog.giuliosciorio.com/?p=550
12/17/2012 11:08:52 AM · #25
Seriously consider the 5D classic. You won't do any better for your money - that much I feel very comfortable guaranteeing.
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