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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 USM Macro
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06/06/2012 10:11:47 AM · #1
This appears to the the lens of choice for top macros based on the Green Macro challenge just finished.

How close do you have to be with this lens to get shots like those in the top 5 of the Green Macro challenge?

06/06/2012 10:15:28 AM · #2
its hard to tell if cropping or extension tubes were used.
06/06/2012 10:15:42 AM · #3
I was about 3 - 4 inches from the fly Jia but I sometimes put my extension tubes on which can put me down to 2 inches or less.

If I had the money I would love an mp-e 65 (next year hopefully) but the 100mm is an awesome lens.
06/06/2012 10:20:23 AM · #4
Originally posted by Mark-A:

I was about 3 - 4 inches from the fly Jia but I sometimes put my extension tubes on which can put me down to 2 inches or less.

If I had the money I would love an mp-e 65 (next year hopefully) but the 100mm is an awesome lens.


Wow! So have to really just get right up in the fly's face to get pics like this. Would you suggest an mp-e 65 over the 100 mm for a first macro lens? Seems like the 65 would need to be even closer to the fly and it might fly off?
06/06/2012 10:26:49 AM · #5
To be totally honest it's a patience game I spent about 12 hours on and off trying to get a shot for this challenge over 3 days with my stepson. Eventually went in to the garden one afternoon and this fly was just sitting there and didn't move no matter how much I moved around it. I personally would choose the MP-E 65 because now I want one I know I'll have to try and sell the 100 before I can buy the 65 but for a first time lens the 100 is great and also makes a nice portrait lens too!

Horses for courses really but it really depends on your nature if you have patience in abundance then macro could be your game :)
06/06/2012 10:29:34 AM · #6
Sold my 65 a couple of years ago because a) it was rarely used and b) I wasn't getting the pics I wanted - imho it is the hardest lens to use of all I have owned. At 5* macro you can fill a crop sensor with a grain of rice and dof is probably measured in microns!

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_497975.jpg
06/06/2012 10:34:10 AM · #7
To be honest I've been experimenting with my x2 converter and tubes lately plus I'm making my own lighting rig (waiting on parts) so I might not need the 65 anyway I'll post some results soon.
06/06/2012 10:38:28 AM · #8
Originally posted by JiaBob:


Wow! So have to really just get right up in the fly's face to get pics like this. Would you suggest an mp-e 65 over the 100 mm for a first macro lens? Seems like the 65 would need to be even closer to the fly and it might fly off?


Yep, you do have to get in close. Even with the 180/3.5L Macro, you need to be pretty close at 1:1 magnification.
The MP-E65 is definitely not something you want to try as your first or only macro lens. I bought one last year and I love it, but I've owned and used macro lenses since the 1980s. When you have mastered the use of a standard macro lens, and you feel you have the patience to progress, then the MP-E65 is the lens of choice for getting substantially beyond 1:1. In the interim, there are ways to do so with the 100/2.8 macro, such as using the lens with extension tubes or with a teleconverter (you mount a 12mm extension tube between the lens and converter to eliminate mechanical interference that otherwise would cause incompatibility).
06/06/2012 10:43:24 AM · #9
Kirbic the 100 won't actually mount on to the TC without the tube which I didn't realise until the other day but as you say a quick attachment of the tube eliminates this problem.
06/06/2012 10:46:57 AM · #10
Thinking about lying in the grass for 12 hours waiting for an insect to land makes me itch, but I would really love to get into macro. It sounds like the 100 mm is the lens I should get. Now I just need to save up a bazillion dollars, so I can afford one.
06/06/2012 10:48:57 AM · #11
Look around for a good second hand one that's what I did.

Post on the forum you never know your luck :)
06/06/2012 10:49:59 AM · #12
i bought all my lenses used. its a great way to save a few bucks.
06/06/2012 11:02:08 AM · #13
Originally posted by mike_311:

i bought all my lenses used. its a great way to save a few bucks.


I have never bought a new lens other than kit and have never had a problem.

BTW this lens is on my short list.
06/06/2012 03:06:16 PM · #14
//www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1120506

$440, act fast.
06/06/2012 04:05:55 PM · #15
For my macro entry I was maybe about a foot away. I may have been closer, but I can't remember off the top of my head. Certain subjects will allow you to get right up in their faces, and others will scatter if you get too close. So like what Mark has mentioned earlier macro photography is all about patience. You can sometimes go weeks or months without taking a shot you're happy with but if you stick things out it can really pay off in the end.

As for the Canon 100mm f/2.8 lens itself it's an awesome lens. I was lucky enough to get a one fairly cheap off bhphoto a few months ago, but if you're set against buying it used right now there is a $40 instant rebate going around for this lens.

Message edited by author 2012-06-06 16:06:18.
06/06/2012 04:10:25 PM · #16
I think my 100mm lens is the best quality lens I own. I have the 100-400L, which I love, but as far as image quality, my 100mm is unparalleled in my bag.

I use it a lot for regular photography. As someone mentioned, it's excellent for portraits, though you have to get a ways back.

I highly recommend it! Highly!
06/06/2012 04:13:29 PM · #17
Originally posted by mike_311:

//www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1120506

$440, act fast.

If you buy it, disinfect it before use.

Originally posted by for sale ad:

Selling this unused macro lens for a friend of mine. She bought it out of her photography enthusiasm but only used it for one session of her crabs
06/06/2012 04:26:40 PM · #18
Am surprised you didn't suggest dipping in boiling water Art!

Originally posted by Art Roflmao:

Originally posted by mike_311:

//www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1120506

$440, act fast.

If you buy it, disinfect it before use.

Originally posted by for sale ad:

Selling this unused macro lens for a friend of mine. She bought it out of her photography enthusiasm but only used it for one session of her crabs
06/06/2012 04:37:34 PM · #19
Originally posted by Ecce Signum:

Am surprised you didn't suggest dipping in boiling water Art!

Originally posted by Art Roflmao:

Originally posted by mike_311:

//www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1120506

$440, act fast.

If you buy it, disinfect it before use.

Originally posted by for sale ad:

Selling this unused macro lens for a friend of mine. She bought it out of her photography enthusiasm but only used it for one session of her crabs


Boiling water won't completely disinfect it either, so says my wife taking microbiology currently. I get all kinds of fun pointers.
06/06/2012 04:37:50 PM · #20
Originally posted by Mark-A:

I was about 3 - 4 inches from the fly Jia but I sometimes put my extension tubes on which can put me down to 2 inches or less.

If I had the money I would love an mp-e 65 (next year hopefully) but the 100mm is an awesome lens.


Missing the cheers for the 60mm in this thread, but the mp-e 65 is also on my wish list.
06/06/2012 04:43:15 PM · #21
Originally posted by Ecce Signum:

Am surprised you didn't suggest dipping in boiling water Art!

I am more of an open flame disinfecter.

Originally posted by hajeka:

Missing the cheers for the 60mm in this thread

I had the 60mm for a year or so then sold it because I never shot much macros plus it just didn't have the reach of the 100mm which I would like to have someday soon.
06/06/2012 04:59:26 PM · #22
Originally posted by Art Roflmao:


I had the 60mm for a year or so then sold it because I never shot much macros plus it just didn't have the reach of the 100mm which I would like to have someday soon.


Talking about range, isn't the 180mm more preferable (ignoring the cost aspect here). Btw. Does anyone here has experience with a macro rail? Useful or not?



Message edited by author 2012-06-06 17:01:23.
06/06/2012 05:01:57 PM · #23
Originally posted by hajeka:

Talking about range, isn't the 180mm more preferable (ignoring the cost aspect here). Btw. Does anyone here has experience with a macro rail? Useful or not?


I've not used or had the need for a focus rail yet (although I wouldn't rule it out for focus stacking) - but I am in the process of making a flash rail so that I can extend the flash depending on how many tubes I am using. Will post some results as and when I complete it.

Message edited by author 2012-06-06 17:02:35.
06/06/2012 05:23:12 PM · #24
Originally posted by hajeka:

Originally posted by Mark-A:

I was about 3 - 4 inches from the fly Jia but I sometimes put my extension tubes on which can put me down to 2 inches or less.

If I had the money I would love an mp-e 65 (next year hopefully) but the 100mm is an awesome lens.


Missing the cheers for the 60mm in this thread, but the mp-e 65 is also on my wish list.


The Canon EF-S 60mm macro is a wonderful lens. Its equivalent focal length (96mm) on the cropped sensor is about what the 100mm is on the FF sensor. That's a very good length for all-around portrait shooting, so the 60mm is an excellent walkaround prime lens on the APS-C sensor cameras, just as the same can be said for the 100mm on the FF cameras. At macro distances (1:1) there's no difference in the DOF, despite what intuition would tell you. DOF is a function of magnification, basically, not focal length. Taking into account aperture size, of course.

There's not even THAT much of a difference in working distance between the 100mm and the 60mm, surprisingly. There would SEEM to be if you look at focusing distances,, but those are measured from subject-to-sensor, and "working distance" is measured from subject-to-front element. The 60 mm is a MUCH shorter lens than the 100mm, so the working distances are within an inch and a half or so of each other; not an extreme variation.

The 60mm's every bit as sharp as the 100mm, it weighs a lot less, it's less bulky, it's a REALLY nice lens.

But, ah... The new 100mm f/2.8L macro, with the third-generation IS; THAT'S a heck of a lens :-)

There ya go, Hajeka :-)
06/06/2012 06:05:29 PM · #25
Originally posted by hajeka:

Btw. Does anyone here has experience with a macro rail? Useful or not?


I have one and used it for still subjects however depending on what you are shooting you can get the same effect by moving the subject if that is possible of course. You also stack 2 rails so you can move forward/back and left/right.
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