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DPChallenge Forums >> Business of Photography >> *UPDATED* Photography Business, how to attract clients?
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02/21/2012 12:53:41 PM · #1
I graduated a little over a year ago and decided to take a year off to think about what I really wanted to do. I have an environmental studies bachelors degree and I'm really good at it (full scholarship), but I don't love it enough to continue with a masters program. Recently I decided to try and build a photography business but I can't seem to attract new clients.

So I guess I have a couple of questions for those who have gone through this. What are some cost-effective ways to advertise my photography? Do I need to specialize more? Are my prices too high? Does my website look professional enough? (made it myself took forever since I didn't know coding!) I would really appreciate any advise/critiques, I'm not a "business person" so it's really difficult for me to put myself out there and sell my photography, it's also very difficult to see my work through other peoples eyes. Thanks guys! My Website
02/21/2012 01:14:32 PM · #2
Well Justin, your first response is from someone who cannot take the kind of photographs that you are very good at, and who does take the kind of photographs that you would not want to take, and couldn't sell to anyone even if you did want to. So why would I respond at all? Just to say that I think you do have something very good going for you. Two things. You're talented and you're personally saleable. Don't underestimate that last part! You'll get some good advice in this thread I imagine, much of it from people less talented than yourself, though more experienced and well qualified to advise you. Whatever advice you do decide to follow, I believe that if you believe in yourself, you'll succeed. But were I you I'd look most closely at the advice of someone like ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_N.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21_N.gif', '/') + 1) . ' tanguera. She has both the talent to match yours and the practical business savvy to show you something worth knowing about exploiting it, I reckon.
02/21/2012 01:38:40 PM · #3
Thank you Paul for the feedback, I appreciate it, I do think I need to believe in myself more and that's a big part of becoming saleable. I'm working on it!
02/21/2012 02:11:27 PM · #4
Hahahah! Rumors of my business savvy have been greatly exaggerated :-)

Besides, I hope to someday shoot as well as you, Justin. Your "product" is flawless, and since "ribbons" are at least a moderately accurate way to measure wide appeal, I'd say you're doing quite well in that department. I'm pretty new to the "professional" thing myself, but really, the road is a general one, with individual variations according to personal taste. Skip, hahn23, etc. will undoubtedly do things differently than me, and than you. We need to take advice we can use and apply it in our own way.

Your site is fine. I don't know that I'd break it up into two "sites" (world/portrait). That confuses me a bit. But it's clean, and navigates easily. I think it helps to focus on the type of photography you MOST like so that people can identify you with something. Being a jack of all trades (like most of us) just means you're one of millions. For example, I happen to really enjoy people with pets portraiture. It's a hugely competitive market, but that's what I'm getting "known" for.

It's also important to set specific goals, and make decisions about your photography. Do you want to be a commercial photographer? Fine Arts? Magazines? Portraitist? Each of these will require slightly different approaches. For example, for fine arts, entering online juried contests is a great way to build your CV and have curators see your work.

Flickr is a love it/hate it option, with enormous upside and downside. I was recently approached by an art director at an ad agency to license an image he saw on Flickr. In what has to be the greatest irony of all, that same image was one that was pirated last year.

I don't have much more to offer, but if you have any questions, ask away. And best of luck.
02/21/2012 02:48:45 PM · #5
Justin, you are INCREDIBLY talented, and honestly I'm surprised that you are having problems finding work. I'm continualy impressed and inspired by your work. I cant offer much help, since i'm in the same boat as you are. People think that my work is really good, but i still need to have faith in my abilities. I lack in that and models to help build my port. What people have been saying to me lately is to take advantage of any chance at showing my work off and to spread the word about my work and business. anyways. Best of luck to you, i'll let you know if anything works for me, and might work for you too.
02/21/2012 02:57:12 PM · #6
Justin, I definitely agree, your work is great.

I surfed through your website, and I felt it was professional, though I agree with Johanna that it isn't necessary to break it up as you did. Keep it elegant and simple. My only constructive comment would be about the photo you have of yourself on the 'About' page. Considering how amazing the portraits you do are for others, why not invest in a portrait of the same caliber for yourself on that page? Everything about your page says 'pro photographer' to me until I get to that "About" page photo. I get to that photo and breaks the spell the rest of the website puts me under.

Also, have you networked in your local area to try and connect with potential clients? Have you checked in with past clients? I have a real estate agent who routinely calls to 'check-in', ask me how my family is doing, and see if we know anyone who is buying or selling a home. It can be a little annoying, but I understand this is what he has to do to generate business, so I don't mind terribly when he calls. I'm not saying you should call past clients, but maybe put together a mailing list.

Look at all the rewards and publications you have on your website. Look at the ribbons you've attained here. You've got no reason to NOT believe in yourself. So just go out there and get it done. I'm 37 years old, and just a couple of years ago I figured out what I really want to do with my life, so I'm happy for you, because you are WAY ahead of the game. I've spent the last ten years doing a job I'm really good at but don't love at all. If photography is what you really want to do, don't let anyone tell you you should spend your life doing something else.

I was raised to believe that I should go after the sure job that'll pay the bills, and that I should try to find things to love about that job. Utter bull, if I may say so. Find what you love to do, and the money will follow.

Message edited by author 2012-02-21 14:58:41.
02/21/2012 02:59:21 PM · #7
This might sound silly, and I'm not claiming to have done many paid gigs, but I've gotten a couple just by having my camera with me in public. Meaning, I was shooting one day messing around and then went into a coffee shop to get a cup and I got a gig. Another, I just didn't want to leave my camera in my car, and people saw that I had a large lens, and inquired if I did paid work, and I was able to meet their needs. I'm not saying that this meets the need of advertising or anything, but people seeing you build curiosity, as well. I can't count the number of times I've been asked about my photography if I have a camera with me going into social settings like this (normally because I never leave my camera in my truck). It's an odd but true situation, a result of the peculiar "project that you are a professional." It gives you an "in" with all the folks that ask you. I don't do it as I don't encourage work, but carrying business cards during this sort of thing seems like it would work well.
02/21/2012 03:03:53 PM · #8
Originally posted by spiritualspatula:

This might sound silly, and I'm not claiming to have done many paid gigs, but I've gotten a couple just by having my camera with me in public. Meaning, I was shooting one day messing around and then went into a coffee shop to get a cup and I got a gig. Another, I just didn't want to leave my camera in my car, and people saw that I had a large lens, and inquired if I did paid work, and I was able to meet their needs. I'm not saying that this meets the need of advertising or anything, but people seeing you build curiosity, as well. I can't count the number of times I've been asked about my photography if I have a camera with me going into social settings like this (normally because I never leave my camera in my truck). It's an odd but true situation, a result of the peculiar "project that you are a professional." It gives you an "in" with all the folks that ask you. I don't do it as I don't encourage work, but carrying business cards during this sort of thing seems like it would work well.


Very similar, I was walking around a dog park in Brooklyn on a random Sunday afternoon, took a good few hundred photos of people and there dogs, handed out a bunch of business cards, not only did people want prints, but they inquired about future studio and other paid gigs.

I guess I was just "In the right place at the right time with the right camera"
02/21/2012 03:13:33 PM · #9
Hey Justin,

Well I don't make my living from photography and any sales I do occasionally get pretty much just fall in my lap. So I can't offer much help regarding building a photography business, but I can give you a pep talk :)
As your former teammate, I observed first hand the talent you have for getting great captures. I also observed your abilities to bring out the best in your captures through a broad understanding of processing techniques. On many occasions you were also able to show your teammates how to improve their processing. Your talent exceeds that of the vast majority of DPC users, and I dare say even those with lots of ribbons because there is a formula for ribbons here that won't necessarily translate to the real world and the business of photography. You definitely have the talent to succeed.

I'm not sure how I ended up following your friend Claire McAdams page on Facebook, but she seems to be keeping busy putting out great work for clients. I noticed through FB you also assisted her on at least one shoot recently so expect you are getting some good advice from her. I hope her business is proving to profitable for her.
As far as getting your name out in your local community goes, have you thought about doing some exhibits in places like local coffeehouses? A nice exhibit with your bio and plenty of business cards on hand could bring some business in for you. You might want to contact local Graphic Art firms and Ad Agencies to let them know you are available for specific jobs.

I wish I could offer you more advice on getting things going. But I can offer you a big BEST OF LUCK!
I think you have what it takes Justin and hope you are very successful :)
-Brent
02/21/2012 03:49:05 PM · #10
Take it from someone who also has an effective block against self-promotion, sometimes you just can't do it all ... perhaps see if you can find/know some go-getter type who can act as your agent or representative and hustle up some work for you -- believe it or not, some peole actually LIKE doing that sort of thing. ;-)

I also think the idea of carrying a camera around is good, along with some business cards (and maybe some model releases!). I like to print mine on regular 4x6 prints a few at a time and trim them myself. You can put your picture on it, or one or more pictures representative of your portfolio; I actually make up a card for every one of my "for sale" prints; if I ever get to display them the cards can be placed alongside, and they are inexpensive samples of the same type/quality print I'm trying to sell. Here are a couple of examples of mine:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_792812.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_792812.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_952178.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_952178.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
If you have any panoramics you can also make "bookmarks" 2, 3, or 4-up on a 4x6: ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875910.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875910.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875913.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875913.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
02/21/2012 03:51:41 PM · #11
Thanks guys for the advise and pep talks, I needed it! haha Most of this is coming from anxiety, I'll be moving out of the parents house soon and I would love to be able to pay the bills with my photos. Just starting a new part of my life and trying to figure things out.

I will see what to do with my two websites, I love travel photography (and sell them in stock sites) and would eventually like to build a big travel portfolio to license images. I didn't want to mix that with my portraiture, so I got the idea of separate sites. It's probably best to create a completely separate site for the travel stuff. I like the suggestions of being seen more, maybe I'll set up a time to go into coffee shops and edit photos while having my camera out. I'll also work on my About page and photo!

@Brent Thanks! I'm going to work on getting a small exhibit, I've never done one and could be good exposure. Claire has been a great friend and her business is doing very well. We actually met up in Iceland and Paris and it turns out she only lives 4hours away!
03/16/2012 10:10:28 AM · #12
Originally posted by GeneralE:

' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_792812.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_792812.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_952178.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_952178.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
If you have any panoramics you can also make "bookmarks" 2, 3, or 4-up on a 4x6: ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875910.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875910.jpg', '/') + 1) . ' ' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875913.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_portfolio/0-4999/1031/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_875913.jpg', '/') + 1) . '


Great idea. Thanks for sharing.
03/16/2012 12:18:03 PM · #13
My two cents... get into taking sports photography if you can stomach it. Taking team and individual sports portraits is a good way to make some money and get your name out there. You are creative and talented enough to take shots that will seperate you from the competition and help you grow your business. It may not push your creativity, but it could push your business to where you want it to be.
03/21/2012 02:26:48 PM · #14
I'm late to the thread, but couldn't resist jumping in...

I don't think there are any good answers to your questions right now, in fact, I just returned from a workshop where I worked with a number of very talented photographers/business people who are also working through the same question. We all know that the business of photography has been changing since the introduction of digital and that many more traditional photographers have struggled. But there has been another recent shift (at least here in the US) that is having an even greater impact on professional photographers. Most cities are now completely saturated with new photographers that are willing to shoot almost anything for about $99 and then turn over a CD full of images. If you doubt this, take a look at craigslist or Facebook for photographers in your area. It seems that even the professionals that weathered the initial digital storm are now feeling the pain of low cost photographers and printing options flooding the market. What I can tell you, from personal experience, is what NOT to do.

In general, you can compete for business by price or by uniqueness of product and quality of service. When I look at your work in your personal gallery (it is impressive), I am definitely thinking uniqueness of product and quality of service. But, when I look at your prices and the accompanying images, I'm thinking that you are a generalist competing on price. So, let me through some numbers at you. A photo business in the US, without a retail studio, is going to generate, on average, $48K for it's owner. I think on average this type of photographer is keeping 35% of his sales as their compensation, So you will need around $138 in sales to keep your business going. If we take your popular session as an average, you will need to shoot 914 session a year or at least 3 popular sessions as day, six days a week. I'm not sure how you feel about it, but is depressed me when I did the math. But, before you freak out completely, let me suggest an alternative. The personal gallery on you web site is filled with amazing (unique) images. Why not create beautiful custom images tuned to your clients needs and that can be used as wall art. People pay well over $300 for impersonal wall art at Pier 1, who wouldn't they pay $400 - $600 for wall art that is personal (that's one print). Lets say you add in the photo session and some additional prints and get an $800 sale. This may sounds like a lot to you, but when you look at what people pay for decorative art it's not really that big a stretch. The key thing though, you are now looking for 3.5 clients a week that want your unique art vs 18 clients a week that are looking for a low cost photographer. Anybody with a digital camera can offer low prices, but not many people can offer the unique vision that your bring to the table.

I still don't know how to tell you to attract clients, but I can bet that the 3 clients who will buy your art are looking in different places than the people looking for $150 sessions. Get a high end furniture store to hang one or two or your prints (at your expense) in their showroom. Create some art that a high end restaurant in your area would be willing to hang. I'm hoping that you are now thinking of ways to attract a handful of special clients. I know I'm now looking at your gallery thinking I've got to up my game AND start looking for those same clients.

I've been shooting semi-professionaly since 2007 and I can tell you that the photography business has changed dramatically in the last 2 years. Now these photographers clearly aren't going to produce the same quality of image that you will, in fact your portraits are better what I see from many well established professionals. In my opinion, what you do with this information is critical to your future success as a photographer.
03/21/2012 03:09:12 PM · #15
In any business you have your generalists and your specialists. In home construction, you have the guy who will do everything from clean your gutters, to building you a new home; and you have the niche builders, who only run trim,or build high end treehouses, or only repair wooden windows. In busy times, the generalist does well, but in lean times the specialist is the first guy who gets called.

Photography is much the same. There are a ton of people out there who are marketing themselves as photographers. The people who seem to be keeping their head above water occupy a niche market, be it pet photography, the wedding thing, senior portraits, product work, ect. I know people who are really generalists who have different websites and marketing materials for several niche markets.

As all this applies to you, there seems to be agreement that you have the photographic skills and artistic vision, but can you find a market for those skills? Being a great shooter is only helpful if you can find clients who want to buy that skill set. IMHO you need to focus you marketing on one niche. If it is weddings, made that your landing spot on your website. Your personal stuff is lovely, but it belongs further down the site, when people can see what you are selling and are looking to see how good you are generally. As it is now, your website has two images and choices that say " I do a bunch of different shooting for clients, and I do a bunch of shooting for myself." The message is that you are an aspiring generalist photographer. Is that the message you want clients to have?

One clear consistent message to a targeted market will draw more interest that the more general "I am a good photographer and can shoot anything" even though that is more truthful that claiming a mastery over any single niche. When you are looking to sell yourself, think like a buyer. Marketing a business is a bastard artform that makes many artist cringe with shame when they dip their toe in it. If you are going to do it you have to dive in and get fully immersed. Levinson's Guerilla Marketing is a good place to start
03/21/2012 03:33:02 PM · #16
Great post Brennan, now you've got me thinking about my own marketing messages as well as Justin's. It seem counterintuitive to narrow brand focus rather than broaden it during tough times, but I know for a fact your are right. I pretty much cratered my business last year by going with a toned down general approach (that wouldn't scare anybody away) and lowering my prices. Four years of steady growth for my business went straight down the tube!

Message edited by author 2012-03-21 15:34:07.
03/21/2012 03:50:43 PM · #17
Man, this thread scares me a bit. Because sometimes I dream about how awesome it would be to live off of photography, but if YOU can't even get clients with all of your fantastic skill, then I definitely absolutely can't xD

Edit to add:

Did some snooping and this "I currently only book weddings 6 months in advance. " stood out to me. If you want more clients, getting rid of that time restriction can surely only help. With so many things going on when planning a wedding, I think there are many potential clients who are not thinking of the photographer 6 months in advance

Message edited by author 2012-03-21 15:54:31.
02/11/2013 01:44:52 PM · #18
Hello everyone,

So it's been almost a year since I posted this, and figured an update was in order!

Everyone's kind words and advised really did help me out, Skip even took the time to talk to me on the phone! After changing a few things, and trying to promote my work more, 2012 ended up being a great year! I booked a lot more clients and even ended up photographing our very own' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/31_F.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/31_F.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Shermy's wedding in Canada, yah, we are best friends now haha :)

So what helped me get more clients?

1. A FREE photoshoot! I asked one of my younger brothers friends, who is a very popular cheerleader, if she would like a free photoshoot and in return post the photos on facebook and tell her friends about me. That photoshoot led to most of my jobs in 2012, including a big job photographing all the cheerleaders of one of the high schools (about 80 of them). From that I got birthday parties, family portraits, senior portraits etc.. So now, every now and then I am doing a free or discounted photoshoot in return for some free word of mouth advertising :)

2. Facebook! I've been trying to post more photos on facebook, both in my personal profile and my business page. By posting some fun pictures I did of a few friends, I booked a wedding from someone I knew in high school. She hadn't thought about me until she saw the photos. I've also gotten a few people who stumbled on my facebook page through someone that "liked" my photos. Keeping in touch is key.

So my schedule was not "packed" but the amount of work coming my way was a HUGE increase, and I was able to pay all my bills hehe. The more photoshoots, the more work comes my way through word of mouth. In the slower months (like now with the crazy weather), my stock photography helps cover expenses.

I've also discovered that I do like photographing weddings! I photographed my 4th and 5th weddings, leaning towards the more artsy area of wedding photography, and despite the stress I definitely want to photograph more of them.

We'll see what 2013 brings! Thanks guys ;)


02/11/2013 04:13:49 PM · #19
Glad to hear a positive ending!!
02/11/2013 04:20:10 PM · #20
excellent info and great work keep it up!!!
02/11/2013 08:35:52 PM · #21
Good to hear it Justin.

If you are liking the wedding shoots, have you been in contact with local wedding planners ? Those are the folks who can expand your reach beyond your circle of friends. Find out who are the up and coming folks in your market and approach them as you did the first cheerleader. Bigger budget weddings almost always use planners, and that is the doorway you have to get through.

Each planner has a niche, so figure out what level of lavish and pressure you want to work in, and find out who plans those weddings. No matter how well off the usual client is, the planners always have a few in a season that they are doing on the cheap, so they are willing to take a risk on an unknown but promising shooter. Let them know that they want you. Work for cheap/free with proviso that if the work is good enough you get a fair price, so as to reduce their risk. They get a lot of calls from flakes, and live in terror of having hired someone who won't show up, or can't do the job when they get there, so it is a tough market to crack. Be persistent and professional, call back every few weeks to hear another round of "No thanks". Expect the brushoff 95% of the time. To get enough of the 5% when they want what you are selling, you have to make a lot of calls. Once you have been at it a while they will know you are serious, and once they see your work for what it is they will be willing to use you on the big budget weddings.

Message edited by author 2013-02-11 20:36:12.
02/11/2013 09:16:32 PM · #22
Originally posted by BrennanOB:

Good to hear it Justin.

If you are liking the wedding shoots, have you been in contact with local wedding planners ? Those are the folks who can expand your reach beyond your circle of friends. Find out who are the up and coming folks in your market and approach them as you did the first cheerleader. Bigger budget weddings almost always use planners, and that is the doorway you have to get through.

Each planner has a niche, so figure out what level of lavish and pressure you want to work in, and find out who plans those weddings. No matter how well off the usual client is, the planners always have a few in a season that they are doing on the cheap, so they are willing to take a risk on an unknown but promising shooter. Let them know that they want you. Work for cheap/free with proviso that if the work is good enough you get a fair price, so as to reduce their risk. They get a lot of calls from flakes, and live in terror of having hired someone who won't show up, or can't do the job when they get there, so it is a tough market to crack. Be persistent and professional, call back every few weeks to hear another round of "No thanks". Expect the brushoff 95% of the time. To get enough of the 5% when they want what you are selling, you have to make a lot of calls. Once you have been at it a while they will know you are serious, and once they see your work for what it is they will be willing to use you on the big budget weddings.


Thank you, I was just thinking of doing that! Now that I have done a few weddings of different sizes successfully I have more examples to show.
02/11/2013 10:04:38 PM · #23
Originally posted by elsapo:

I graduated a little over a year ago and decided to take a year off to think about what I really wanted to do. I have an environmental studies bachelors degree and I'm really good at it (full scholarship), but I don't love it enough to continue with a masters program. Recently I decided to try and build a photography business but I can't seem to attract new clients.

So I guess I have a couple of questions for those who have gone through this. What are some cost-effective ways to advertise my photography? Do I need to specialize more? Are my prices too high? Does my website look professional enough? (made it myself took forever since I didn't know coding!) I would really appreciate any advise/critiques, I'm not a "business person" so it's really difficult for me to put myself out there and sell my photography, it's also very difficult to see my work through other peoples eyes. Thanks guys! My Website


Your site is fine. Your photography is great.

Why are you charging $200 for a DVD with 30 pictures on it? That's really exorbitant for a disc.

You say you aren't a business person. Why are you running a business then? Since you are actually trying to run a business, learn business. Take classes, read anything you can about running a business, whatever it takes to get the knowledge to run a business. Find a mentor in your local business organization (Chamber of Commerce, or whatever you have in your area) and ask them every question you can think of.

What are you doing to attract new customers? Are you running any advertising?

Edit: Well it looks like you have gotten work in the past year (any chance the title can be edited to reflect that it's a revival/update?).

Message edited by author 2013-02-11 22:11:31.
02/11/2013 10:17:10 PM · #24
Originally posted by alohadave:


Why are you charging $200 for a DVD with 30 pictures on it? That's really exorbitant for a disc.

If I read correctly, that's a DVD with high-resolution images that the client can use to print on their own images. In this is the case, he's selling the ability to print their own images instead of buying through him. I would say $200 is pretty inexpensive.

Message edited by author 2013-02-11 22:18:48.
02/11/2013 10:29:02 PM · #25
Originally posted by Nusbaum:

Originally posted by alohadave:


Why are you charging $200 for a DVD with 30 pictures on it? That's really exorbitant for a disc.

If I read correctly, that's a DVD with high-resolution images that the client can use to print on their own images. In this is the case, he's selling the ability to print their own images instead of buying through him. I would say $200 is pretty inexpensive.


Yup really inexpensive, and almost every single client gets it. In my area people have to buy at least $500 worth of prints/products to have the chance to buy the files. I've noticed that most people want the files so that's what I decided to offer for now. Most clients also order prints though, but not $500 worth.

@David I'll try to get the title updated
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