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01/24/2012 02:31:01 AM · #1
//cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/23/haunting-portraits-of-the-homeless/?hpt=hp_c2

Tears in my eyes, what we doing to our fellow man. Even this, what are we allowing our fellow man to do to themselves.
01/24/2012 03:23:36 AM · #2
Originally posted by docpjv:

what we doing to our fellow man

Exploiting them for profit by throwing a popup ad on every 4th or 5th slide. (if by "we", you mean CNN)
01/24/2012 03:38:59 AM · #3
the more things change, the more they stay the same:
//newsjunkiepost.com/2009/11/07/a-perspective-on-unemployment/
note: i mainly linked the iconic photo, but the article is based on historical records, hard to dispute it much. (unless it contrasts your strongly held beliefs!!))
01/24/2012 04:25:24 AM · #4
Makes me wanna take my lights and back drops into the city and set up a 'Soup for portrait' tent.
Excellent photos.
01/24/2012 04:56:44 AM · #5
Originally posted by docpjv:

//cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/23/haunting-portraits-of-the-homeless/?hpt=hp_c2

Tears in my eyes, what we doing to our fellow man. Even this, what are we allowing our fellow man to do to themselves.


The sad truth is that (in this country at least) "allowing" is not part of the game. The authorities cannot force these poor people to do anything, not even take them to a hospice and some prefer to be alone and not have to deal with authority.

There are organizations and individuals that provide warm food, clothing and blankets for the homeless and try to convince them to come inside during the winter months, but often to no avail.

Yes it is sad, but in some instances the situation could be rectified with the participation of all involved.

Ray
01/24/2012 05:37:48 AM · #6
Originally posted by Art Roflmao:

Originally posted by docpjv:

what we doing to our fellow man

Exploiting them for profit by throwing a popup ad on every 4th or 5th slide. (if by "we", you mean CNN)

Point well made Art, but maybe we have to think of it as the inevitable cost of awareness, much like plastic waste is an inevitable cost of affordable consumer products. Better to accept some ethical downside than to have total silence regarding the face of homelessness. We can live with compromise more honorably than with ignorance.

01/24/2012 06:36:28 AM · #7
Originally posted by RayEthier:

Originally posted by docpjv:

//cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/23/haunting-portraits-of-the-homeless/?hpt=hp_c2

Tears in my eyes, what we doing to our fellow man. Even this, what are we allowing our fellow man to do to themselves.


The sad truth is that (in this country at least) "allowing" is not part of the game. The authorities cannot force these poor people to do anything, not even take them to a hospice and some prefer to be alone and not have to deal with authority.

There are organizations and individuals that provide warm food, clothing and blankets for the homeless and try to convince them to come inside during the winter months, but often to no avail.

Yes it is sad, but in some instances the situation could be rectified with the participation of all involved.

Ray


+1 For some, it's a choice they make to live that way...
01/24/2012 11:41:53 AM · #8
Originally posted by The_Tourist:

+1 For some, it's a choice they make to live that way...


Many of today's homeless have mental illnesses that make a normal life without assistance an impossibility. Our mental health system is almost non-existent so if they don't have family to help them there is not much they can do.

I would hardly call mental illness a choice.
01/24/2012 12:09:54 PM · #9
Mental illness is of course not a choice. And those are the homeless I feel worst about.

But alcohol and drugs are a choice. Which costs money. Which they don't earn, so they have to beg/steal. Yes, addiction is a real thing, but in the end, it is about choice. There are SO many programs here in LA. Addicts won't use shelters because they have to "give up" their habit to stay there. There are programs to detox. There are programs to teach skills. There are programs to house them, clothe them, feed them. Most opt for staying on the street so they can continue their habit.

Back to the images, exquisite portraiture
01/24/2012 12:13:47 PM · #10
Originally posted by The_Tourist:

Originally posted by RayEthier:

Originally posted by docpjv:

//cnnphotos.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/23/haunting-portraits-of-the-homeless/?hpt=hp_c2

Tears in my eyes, what we doing to our fellow man. Even this, what are we allowing our fellow man to do to themselves.


The sad truth is that (in this country at least) "allowing" is not part of the game. The authorities cannot force these poor people to do anything, not even take them to a hospice and some prefer to be alone and not have to deal with authority.

There are organizations and individuals that provide warm food, clothing and blankets for the homeless and try to convince them to come inside during the winter months, but often to no avail.

Yes it is sad, but in some instances the situation could be rectified with the participation of all involved.

Ray


+1 For some, it's a choice they make to live that way...

you can't make someone who is agoraphobic go into a shelter without meds it would be a horrible experience for them but what would you care it's a choice they made to be mentally ill, right......that was just a ridiculous statement.

Message edited by author 2012-01-24 12:14:14.
01/24/2012 12:13:54 PM · #11
I will admit I'm being overly general, and yes some of them do choose the life they have. Then again alcohol and drug use are often inappropriately used as a coping mechanism for mental illness.
01/24/2012 12:22:26 PM · #12
Originally posted by bhuge:

Originally posted by The_Tourist:

+1 For some, it's a choice they make to live that way...


Many of today's homeless have mental illnesses that make a normal life without assistance an impossibility. Our mental health system is almost non-existent so if they don't have family to help them there is not much they can do.

I would hardly call mental illness a choice.


That's why I qualified the statement "for some". Again, "for some", they do not have mental health issues, do not have any disabilities. For whatever reason/ circumstances they got to a homeless situation, "for some", it's a lifestyle choice.

For others, I'll agree that some have mental health issues either before or after they became homeless. But you (authorities, society, even family) can't force someone with mental health issues to accept help. It is a difficult situation for those with mental health issues and for those trying to help them.

01/24/2012 12:22:45 PM · #13
well they work and if you can't get the drugs you need you cope any way you can.

actually let me give you an example of the choices us crazy people have to make in a day.
ok the voices in your head are telling you to bang your face into a wall because you are a dirty person...don't forget most of us can't resist what they say. are you gonna
a.)bang your face into the wall
b.)smoke a blunt till they shut the hell up

or here's the bipolar version
you rage so bad you want to punch some ho walking down the street just cause she said hi to you. do you
a.)punch the innocent person in the face or
b.)smoke a blunt till you calm down?

because in all honesty i can't afford 500 bucks a month for meds.

Message edited by author 2012-01-24 12:29:17.
01/24/2012 12:25:49 PM · #14
I remember (I think it was) Christophe saying before that he didn't like street portraiture and that was 'cause it was voyeuristic. Two things struck me about that---I was very impressed that a French dude could know that word, and the second was that he makes a good point if the shots are taken without permission.
These seem to be. Great great portraits. Full of character and feeling.
01/24/2012 12:28:37 PM · #15
Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

... voyeuristic ... I was very impressed that a French dude could know that word ...


Haha! Very droll.
01/24/2012 12:46:59 PM · #16
I find the arguments and counter-arguments about "choice" to be somewhat simplistic. Just because someone makes a choice we don't agree with, even a choice like dropping out of society, it's not a sign they are mentally unstable. Just because someone is a participating member of society does not mean they are mentally healthy or stable.
We live in a semi-rural suburban area that is considered relatively affluent. We have a local homeless man, Jeff, who has been in the area for almost as long as we have (22 years). It is clear that he is in possession of his faculties, however he has steadfastly resisted the offers of housing or other assistance that members of the community have made. His life is, for him, truly a choice. He harms no one, and in turn we respect his choice. To force him into a shelter or to institutionalize him would be wrong.
01/24/2012 01:39:21 PM · #17
Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

I was very impressed that a French dude could know that word,


Well, it IS a French word....
01/24/2012 02:00:35 PM · #18
Most of these would get "over processed" comments here.
01/24/2012 02:49:33 PM · #19
I didn't like the pictures. The "look at me I am serious art" processing does nothing for me nor for the street people.
01/24/2012 03:01:39 PM · #20
All argument and debate aside, here's Lee Jeffries' Photostream at Flickr if you want to see more of his remarkable work.

R.

Message edited by author 2012-01-24 15:02:38.
01/24/2012 04:47:07 PM · #21
Originally posted by tanguera:

Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

I was very impressed that a French dude could know that word,

Well, it IS a French word....

Snap!
01/25/2012 05:10:27 AM · #22
Originally posted by tanguera:

Originally posted by NiallOTuama:

I was very impressed that a French dude could know that word,


Well, it IS a French word....

Hah! :-)

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

All argument and debate aside, here's Lee Jeffries' Photostream at Flickr if you want to see more of his remarkable work.

Thanks for the link!
01/25/2012 06:24:26 AM · #23
Have you visited the photographer's flickr site? If you haven't you should. Read some of his comments on the photos.
01/25/2012 11:17:18 AM · #24
Originally posted by david1707:

Have you visited the photographer's flickr site? If you haven't you should. Read some of his comments on the photos.


Already linked it 4 posts ago...

"here's Lee Jeffries' Photostream at Flickr if you want to see more of his remarkable work."

Message edited by author 2012-01-25 11:17:56.
01/28/2012 02:23:18 AM · #25
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

All argument and debate aside, here's Lee Jeffries' Photostream at Flickr if you want to see more of his remarkable work.

R.
Sorry Bear, took me a few days to follow your link & get back to you. It's superb photographic craftsmanship, but this very quality has the perverse effect of making the pictures, especially when viewed as a whole, lack authenticity.

The photographer has emasculated the photographs by making them too stylized; too meticulously executed; too beautiful, in fact.

The result is that the photographs feel like they are more about Lee Jeffries than anything else.

These pictures are simply not sympathetic (sympathetic in the literal sense).
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