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DPChallenge Forums >> General Discussion >> Do DPC have a responsibility to help stop piracy?
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01/22/2012 03:03:21 AM · #26
Originally posted by RayEthier:

I have no pirated versions of anything, nor does anyone else in my household.

The saddest thing is that all my stuff is legit and I still have no idea how to use it>

Ray


same here Ray
01/22/2012 03:16:32 AM · #27
Download the trial version. At the end of the trial NeatImage will let you continue to use their product but with the restriction that it will only work on a small portion of the image. I have used it to on my 800x entry images.
NeatImage 7 plug-in demo and its limitations.

Message edited by author 2012-01-22 03:22:48.
01/22/2012 09:41:34 AM · #28
Originally posted by SEG:

Originally posted by SDW:


5. I have NeatImage free software. It only allows you to apply noise reduction to a small portion of a large photo.


Neat Image is free? What do you mean small portion of a large image? Can you do an 800px image with the free version?


You can do an 800px image with the free version.
01/22/2012 09:53:19 AM · #29
Bad idea, imo.

I'm really tired of having to prove myself innocent because others steal.

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

The software I purchased on-line and downloaded over the past 10 years of my computer, I had to search through 3 different email accounts and hope that I had kept the messages with the keys.

I agree that I need to be more organized. But it used to be that if you had the software, you could just install it.

To have to prove to DPC that my software is legal would be extremely annoying. Extra work, extra searching even though everything on my computer is legal.

I have to take off my shoes at the airport to prove I'm not a terrorist. I refuse to take off my shoes here to prove I'm not a thief. :P
01/22/2012 10:19:50 AM · #30
i second that
Originally posted by vawendy:

Bad idea, imo.

I'm really tired of having to prove myself innocent because others steal.

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

The software I purchased on-line and downloaded over the past 10 years of my computer, I had to search through 3 different email accounts and hope that I had kept the messages with the keys.

I agree that I need to be more organized. But it used to be that if you had the software, you could just install it.

To have to prove to DPC that my software is legal would be extremely annoying. Extra work, extra searching even though everything on my computer is legal.

I have to take off my shoes at the airport to prove I'm not a terrorist. I refuse to take off my shoes here to prove I'm not a thief. :P


Message edited by author 2012-01-22 10:20:47.
01/22/2012 10:22:39 AM · #31
Third.
Originally posted by o2bskating:

i second that
Originally posted by vawendy:

Bad idea, imo.

I'm really tired of having to prove myself innocent because others steal.

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

The software I purchased on-line and downloaded over the past 10 years of my computer, I had to search through 3 different email accounts and hope that I had kept the messages with the keys.

I agree that I need to be more organized. But it used to be that if you had the software, you could just install it.

To have to prove to DPC that my software is legal would be extremely annoying. Extra work, extra searching even though everything on my computer is legal.

I have to take off my shoes at the airport to prove I'm not a terrorist. I refuse to take off my shoes here to prove I'm not a thief. :P
01/22/2012 11:40:22 AM · #32
Originally posted by vawendy:

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

There is some inventory software out there that you can run on your old PC and will list all the installed software along with a LOT (not all) of the keys used for that software.

I use Belarc Advisor and LOVE it for moving pc's. Lists all hardware & software & drivers so makes life a LOT easier getting a new pc up and running.
01/22/2012 11:55:54 AM · #33
<sarcasm=ON>
Perhaps we can see whether the entry was uploaded by stealing a neighbor's wi-fi bandwidth ... and check everyone's tax returns to see if they paid their state's sales/use tax for their otherwise legitimate software downloads.

And as soon as our travel budget allows, SC members will be visiting all Stateside registered users to collect DNA samples, fingerprints, and retinal scans to make sure no one is on the NSA's no-fly list, the FBI's most-wanted list, or any of the various state sexual predator registries ...
<sarcasm=OFF>
01/22/2012 12:04:57 PM · #34
+1

And the list can go on and on...
01/22/2012 12:27:34 PM · #35
Oh, I agree with the whole painintheass thing about moving software. It's what makes me keep an old computer for as long as humanly possible. I really do hate reinstalling all the software!

I have found, though, that a simple email to the manufacturer usually will result in getting your key.
01/22/2012 12:32:00 PM · #36
Originally posted by Simms:

Do DPC have a responsibility to help stop piracy?


No.
01/22/2012 12:34:02 PM · #37
Sigh - but still you all moan about photos being stolen.

I feel some of you doth protest too much.
01/22/2012 12:43:26 PM · #38
Originally posted by Simms:

Sigh - but still you all moan about photos being stolen.

I feel some of you doth protest too much.

No one here has supported the use of pirated software. But the responsibility for policing people's software installations does not rest with DPC.

When someone goes to a McDonald's drive-thru, is it the responsibility of the burger-flipper to check that the customer has a valid license, registration, and insurance? When you buy groceries, does the clerk make you prove you didn't steal the money?

There is a limit to how far we can and should go in running a free, prizeless photo contest. We try to make sure you are a real person, and that the picture was taken during the specified period, and that's about as far as we can go. We can't make you prove you bought your camera, that it's even yours, or (really) even that YOU took the picture. Requiring people to present proof-of-purchase of their software is about three levels of intrusion too far ...

Message edited by author 2012-01-22 12:44:13.
01/22/2012 12:47:42 PM · #39
Originally posted by vawendy:

Bad idea, imo.

I'm really tired of having to prove myself innocent because others steal.

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

The software I purchased on-line and downloaded over the past 10 years of my computer, I had to search through 3 different email accounts and hope that I had kept the messages with the keys.

I agree that I need to be more organized. But it used to be that if you had the software, you could just install it.

To have to prove to DPC that my software is legal would be extremely annoying. Extra work, extra searching even though everything on my computer is legal.

I have to take off my shoes at the airport to prove I'm not a terrorist. I refuse to take off my shoes here to prove I'm not a thief. :P


The worst example of this I've ever had was with the game half life 2... I actually owned two legal copies (from buying one and being given another), however to be able to play this single player game you needed to have internet access to prove you were using a legal version - now I had internet access but on my pc able to run the game the access was restricted on certain ports and the game just wouldn't let me play it. After about a month I downloaded a pirate version of the game and finally got to play it! It's a real joke some copy protection, it just inconveniences loyal customers and does nothing to stop people who don't want to pay :<.
01/22/2012 01:02:19 PM · #40
Originally posted by GeneralE:

Originally posted by Simms:

Sigh - but still you all moan about photos being stolen.

I feel some of you doth protest too much.

...the responsibility for policing people's software installations does not rest with DPC...


That is the important point. "Responsibility" implies "obligation", and I'm sure no one is looking for another obligation imposed by some other entity.
01/22/2012 01:22:56 PM · #41
Mark, you scamp. ;)

But I'll ring in as someone who completely agrees with your point: it's hypocritical to complain about people stealing your photo if you use pirated software.
01/22/2012 01:35:47 PM · #42
Originally posted by vawendy:

Bad idea, imo.

I'm really tired of having to prove myself innocent because others steal.

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

The software I purchased on-line and downloaded over the past 10 years of my computer, I had to search through 3 different email accounts and hope that I had kept the messages with the keys.

I agree that I need to be more organized. But it used to be that if you had the software, you could just install it.

To have to prove to DPC that my software is legal would be extremely annoying. Extra work, extra searching even though everything on my computer is legal.

I have to take off my shoes at the airport to prove I'm not a terrorist. I refuse to take off my shoes here to prove I'm not a thief. :P


+1


01/22/2012 01:39:24 PM · #43
to be completly honest i don't care if people use pirated software or not just like i don't care if people steal music or movies. but it's really none of dpc's business what software or what not people use or if it's legit it's the company that made the software's problem. if they have programers so dumb that the can't keep a 11 year old from hacking their software well you get what you pay for.
01/22/2012 01:41:07 PM · #44
For what its worth, I've been working with GIMP now for almost three years, and the best part is, its a freebie!!! The software I have purchased is Photomatix and Nikon Capture NX... Collectively, all three programs are still cheaper than the full retail CS5 by about half the price. Obviously CS5 is the go to, extremely powerful software that the pros use, but if your a broke fool like me who doesn't really make any money off Photography, this combo will work well...

Message edited by author 2012-01-22 13:44:43.
01/22/2012 02:03:23 PM · #45
Originally posted by o2bskating:

to be completly honest i don't care if people use pirated software or not just like i don't care if people steal music or movies. but it's really none of dpc's business what software or what not people use or if it's legit it's the company that made the software's problem. if they have programers so dumb that the can't keep a 11 year old from hacking their software well you get what you pay for.


Thats fair enough - by the way, I used this image on a number of Christmas cards I sold this year - it was very popular, selling for about £3 ($5) a time.. So thanks for that, I made enough to buy a new lens!! I`m not giving you any of the money though so there!!
' . substr('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/424/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_272632.jpg', strrpos('//images.dpchallenge.com/images_challenge/0-999/424/120/Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_272632.jpg', '/') + 1) . '

PS, you sound absolutely delightful!

Message edited by author 2012-01-22 14:10:58.
01/22/2012 02:21:29 PM · #46
I can't believe you guys don't see the difference between ripping off a corporation and being ripped off by a corporation. Not to justify anything, but really ....

I use Linux, free, and Irfanview in Wine, free, the former because it is BETTER.
01/22/2012 02:43:49 PM · #47
Originally posted by vawendy:

Bad idea, imo.

I'm really tired of having to prove myself innocent because others steal.

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

The software I purchased on-line and downloaded over the past 10 years of my computer, I had to search through 3 different email accounts and hope that I had kept the messages with the keys.

I agree that I need to be more organized. But it used to be that if you had the software, you could just install it.

To have to prove to DPC that my software is legal would be extremely annoying. Extra work, extra searching even though everything on my computer is legal.

I have to take off my shoes at the airport to prove I'm not a terrorist. I refuse to take off my shoes here to prove I'm not a thief. :P


I was faced with a similar problem a while back and used a personal PC audit (Belard Advisor) that once installed gave me a list of all that was installed on my pc, including the installation keys. Similarly, any software that I downloaded from Adobe could be found in my Adobe account.

Saved me a lot of time in trying to find paperwork. Mind you, I do tend to be a tad vigilant in these matters and have both a soft and hard copy of these key numbers stored both in my office and off-site.

Ray
01/22/2012 02:45:57 PM · #48
Originally posted by o2bskating:

to be completly honest i don't care if people use pirated software or not just like i don't care if people steal music or movies. but it's really none of dpc's business what software or what not people use or if it's legit it's the company that made the software's problem. if they have programers so dumb that the can't keep a 11 year old from hacking their software well you get what you pay for.


... would you feel the same way about an 11 year old who hot wired your car or broke into your house and stole all of your valuables.

Just curious.

Ray
01/22/2012 02:47:39 PM · #49
Originally posted by tnun:

I can't believe you guys don't see the difference between ripping off a corporation and being ripped off by a corporation. Not to justify anything, but really ....

I use Linux, free, and Irfanview in Wine, free, the former because it is BETTER.


Did you know that the cost of pilfering is added to the cost of most items on the shelf?

Trust me, it is not the corporations that end up paying for theft ... it is each and every single customer.

Ray
01/22/2012 02:54:30 PM · #50
Originally posted by RayEthier:

Originally posted by vawendy:

Bad idea, imo.

I'm really tired of having to prove myself innocent because others steal.

I recently upgraded my computer and had to go searching for all the keys to my legal software. Some of them had gotten separated from the software itself. So here I had the legally purchased software in my hands and couldn't install it until I ripped through all my paperwork.

The software I purchased on-line and downloaded over the past 10 years of my computer, I had to search through 3 different email accounts and hope that I had kept the messages with the keys.

I agree that I need to be more organized. But it used to be that if you had the software, you could just install it.

To have to prove to DPC that my software is legal would be extremely annoying. Extra work, extra searching even though everything on my computer is legal.

I have to take off my shoes at the airport to prove I'm not a terrorist. I refuse to take off my shoes here to prove I'm not a thief. :P


I was faced with a similar problem a while back and used a personal PC audit (Belard Advisor) that once installed gave me a list of all that was installed on my pc, including the installation keys. Similarly, any software that I downloaded from Adobe could be found in my Adobe account.

Saved me a lot of time in trying to find paperwork. Mind you, I do tend to be a tad vigilant in these matters and have both a soft and hard copy of these key numbers stored both in my office and off-site.

Ray

For downloaded software I keep a PDF or TXT file of the invoice plus a TXT file of the key, if it's not on the invoice already. I keep a directory full downloads on my backup NAS. If it's on CD, I write the key on the CD with marker. All my CDs are in a stack on top of my file cab. I also have a stack for hardware with old drivers. Some stuff I just download new whenever I change systems, like Open Office. It's still a pain in the neck with some software because it keeps track of how many installs you have going, and you're supposed to decommission it from one PC before installing it on another, which is impossible if the PC konks out, so I end up phoning someone.
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