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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Battery Life effected by the IS lens?
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07/26/2004 06:51:11 PM · #1
Does the Image Stabilizer in the lens use up battery power also?
07/26/2004 06:53:17 PM · #2
Originally posted by jmlelii:

Does the Image Stabilizer in the lens use up battery power also?


Yes. It is a gyroscopic motor than runs from when you half-press the shutter until a moment after you release it. Like any electronic device, that motor does consume battery power.

-Terry
07/26/2004 06:57:53 PM · #3
Originally posted by ClubJuggle:

Originally posted by jmlelii:

Does the Image Stabilizer in the lens use up battery power also?


Yes. It is a gyroscopic motor than runs from when you half-press the shutter until a moment after you release it. Like any electronic device, that motor does consume battery power.

-Terry


But, it doesn't seem to be too much of a power-hog. With a full battery, I can still easily fill a 1GB card with IS on (300-400 shots.)
07/26/2004 07:05:05 PM · #4
Originally posted by BikeRacer:

But, it doesn't seem to be too much of a power-hog. With a full battery, I can still easily fill a 1GB card with IS on (300-400 shots.)


Is that one battery? Or battery grip?

Also, would say, a 28-135 with IS consume less power than the 400mm prime with IS??

i.e. does the size of the IS element effect power consumption?

Message edited by author 2004-07-26 19:13:16.
07/26/2004 07:09:45 PM · #5
Originally posted by wimbello:

Originally posted by BikeRacer:

But, it doesn't seem to be too much of a power-hog. With a full battery, I can still easily fill a 1GB card with IS on (300-400 shots.)


Is that one battery? Or battery grip?

Also, would say, a 28-135 with IS consume more power than the 400mm prime with IS??

i.e. does the size of the IS element effect power consumption?


Just the one battery. Don't know about different lenses, I only have the 28-135 IS, I guess I should have qualified my earlier response.
07/26/2004 07:56:14 PM · #6
The stated reduction in battery life, if memory serves me, is up to a 1/3 (33%) reduction. I suspect that estimate is pretty high, based on my experience with the 70-200 2.8L IS. I haven't noticed a major drop at all, but that said, I rarely shoot that many photos in one session solely with the IS lens.
That will prolly change this week, assuming I go up to Oshkosh & shoot the airshow.
07/26/2004 07:58:32 PM · #7
Originally posted by kirbic:

The stated reduction in battery life, if memory serves me, is up to a 1/3 (33%) reduction. I suspect that estimate is pretty high, based on my experience with the 70-200 2.8L IS. I haven't noticed a major drop at all, but that said, I rarely shoot that many photos in one session solely with the IS lens.
That will prolly change this week, assuming I go up to Oshkosh & shoot the airshow.


Don't try to pan with IS turned on.

-Terry
07/26/2004 08:03:08 PM · #8
Originally posted by ClubJuggle:

Originally posted by kirbic:

The stated reduction in battery life, if memory serves me, is up to a 1/3 (33%) reduction. I suspect that estimate is pretty high, based on my experience with the 70-200 2.8L IS. I haven't noticed a major drop at all, but that said, I rarely shoot that many photos in one session solely with the IS lens.
That will prolly change this week, assuming I go up to Oshkosh & shoot the airshow.


Don't try to pan with IS turned on.

"Mode 2" IS (vertical only) seems to work very well with panning, as long as the motion is roughly horizontal. If I have good weather, I may not need the IS at all, unless I mount the 2.0x teleconverter.

-Terry

07/26/2004 08:46:52 PM · #9
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by ClubJuggle:

Originally posted by kirbic:

The stated reduction in battery life, if memory serves me, is up to a 1/3 (33%) reduction. I suspect that estimate is pretty high, based on my experience with the 70-200 2.8L IS. I haven't noticed a major drop at all, but that said, I rarely shoot that many photos in one session solely with the IS lens.
That will prolly change this week, assuming I go up to Oshkosh & shoot the airshow.


Don't try to pan with IS turned on.

"Mode 2" IS (vertical only) seems to work very well with panning, as long as the motion is roughly horizontal. If I have good weather, I may not need the IS at all, unless I mount the 2.0x teleconverter.

-Terry


The mode 2 is made for paning
07/26/2004 08:50:36 PM · #10
I've never heard of Mode II IS. Is that only on certain lenses?

-Terry
07/26/2004 08:52:08 PM · #11
yes, I think so, I have seen in on 70-200 2.8 L works GREAT
07/26/2004 08:55:57 PM · #12
Mode 2 IS is specifically for panning and yes - the larger the elements the gyro is trying to control, the larger the gyro/motor needs to be and therefore the greater the drain on the battery. How much more of a drain? Maybe with those big monsters (400+) is where you see the true 1/3 battery life drop.
07/26/2004 09:36:32 PM · #13
Yes, the later IS lenses (the 70-200 was the first to have this) have selectable dual-mode IS, where the "mode 2" limits the IS movement to the vertical direction, good for horizontal panning.
I don't think the focal length of the lens has anything to do with the size of the IS system. If the IS element were larger, certainly it would take more power to move it, however the IS elements can be placed at a point where the bundle of light rays is centrally concentrated, avoiding the need for a very large IS element, even on large aperture lenses. As an engineer, I'd strive to make the IS system a "drop-in", that is, sized to accommodate all lenses w/o modification. I suspect this would be the case, since it would drastically reduce design time and production cost.
07/26/2004 10:54:00 PM · #14
In Nikonland, my 24-120 has VR (vibration reduction - IS equivalent). I had planned on turning it off, but decided to just keep it always on (even tripoded) since there was such a small difference.

I find long exposures drain the battery much quicker than a little stabalizing.
07/26/2004 10:59:28 PM · #15
Originally posted by jadin:

In Nikonland, my 24-120 has VR (vibration reduction - IS equivalent). I had planned on turning it off, but decided to just keep it always on (even tripoded) since there was such a small difference.

I find long exposures drain the battery much quicker than a little stabalizing.


You should always turn off IS/VR when shooting on a tripod. When there is no vibrtion to reduce. the gyroscopic motor actually works against itself; the motor atrually CREATES vibration rather than reducing it.

-Terry
07/26/2004 11:04:03 PM · #16
You guys are making me jealous.
07/26/2004 11:04:45 PM · #17
Originally posted by ClubJuggle:

You should always turn off IS/VR when shooting on a tripod. When there is no vibrtion to reduce. the gyroscopic motor actually works against itself; the motor atrually CREATES vibration rather than reducing it.

Not ncessarily true for the latest generation IS lenses. See this post, and look for the reply by Chuck Westfall where he explains it in more detail.

Also, this Canon Tech Report explains it a bit more (search for "tripod detection"). Also, see this page which has more info and lists which lenses have tripod detection.

Message edited by author 2004-07-26 23:15:37.
07/26/2004 11:10:55 PM · #18
The tripod I currently use isn't the best, in fact if I raise the head to my eye level, it wobbles easily. I have a better tripod purchased just need to get it back (long story). Basically I don't notice any additional vibration leaving it on. Maybe I'll have to experiment to really find out.
07/27/2004 04:17:18 AM · #19
Originally posted by kirbic:

.... assuming I go up to Oshkosh & shoot the airshow.


Please post some of those pics.
07/27/2004 09:29:12 AM · #20
I don't have any IS lenses with mode 2, but I do have a question about how it functions. Does it only turn off the horizontal correction? In other words, could you pan vertically with the camera in landscape orientation?
07/27/2004 09:57:39 AM · #21
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

I don't have any IS lenses with mode 2, but I do have a question about how it functions. Does it only turn off the horizontal correction? In other words, could you pan vertically with the camera in landscape orientation?

Yes, it simply turns off the horz. correction. So you can pan horizontally in landscape orientation, or I suppose, pan vertically in portrait orientation. I have not tried the latter, though I will do so if I get the chance at the air show this weekend.
07/27/2004 10:03:02 AM · #22
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

I don't have any IS lenses with mode 2, but I do have a question about how it functions. Does it only turn off the horizontal correction? In other words, could you pan vertically with the camera in landscape orientation?


Think so, with the obvious drawback that you can't pan horizontally with the camera in portrait orientation (which would be nice, given that most people are 'portrait orientation') Maybe IS III...
07/27/2004 10:47:37 AM · #23
Actually the 70-200mm f/2.8 was not the first to have this. The 300mm f/4L IS has it along with the 100-400 IS and the supertele IS lenses. All of those lenses came out before the 70-200.

Greg

Originally posted by kirbic:

Yes, the later IS lenses (the 70-200 was the first to have this) have selectable dual-mode IS, where the "mode 2" limits the IS movement to the vertical direction, good for horizontal panning.
I don't think the focal length of the lens has anything to do with the size of the IS system. If the IS element were larger, certainly it would take more power to move it, however the IS elements can be placed at a point where the bundle of light rays is centrally concentrated, avoiding the need for a very large IS element, even on large aperture lenses. As an engineer, I'd strive to make the IS system a "drop-in", that is, sized to accommodate all lenses w/o modification. I suspect this would be the case, since it would drastically reduce design time and production cost.
07/27/2004 10:52:50 AM · #24
Originally posted by dadas115:

Actually the 70-200mm f/2.8 was not the first to have this. The 300mm f/4L IS has it along with the 100-400 IS and the supertele IS lenses. All of those lenses came out before the 70-200.


Do any of them have selectable horizontal only and vertical only IS, or is it all just one axis that can be disabled ?
07/27/2004 12:30:36 PM · #25
Compare the cost of an IS lens with the cost of an extra battery and you may conclude that it is ludicrous to let the increased battery drain determine whether you use, or purchase, an IS lens.
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