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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Macro - Magnify filters - How do they work?
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07/27/2011 06:17:16 PM · #1
I now have my 60mm Nikon Micro. After seeing some of the macro shots taken with this Canon lens 5X

I was wondering if there was anyting I could do the make my 60mm produce a "bigger" image. Currently it is 1/1 which is fine for most of my macros...lizards...flowers...my dog's nose...etc but was wondering if I could shoot small flies and such if I had it modified with a filter.

I see that you can buy decent close-up filters but how do they work? If I put one on my 60mm with it do 'anything'? If the purpose is to let you get "closer" then is it useless for me because I can already get a working distance of about two inches.

...so I guess my question is will a close-up lens on my 60mm get me a larger macro?

Thanks
07/27/2011 06:25:33 PM · #2
Add-on close-up lenses just enable a lens to focus closer than it normally can. A macro lens can already focus very close, so by adding a close-up lens, you'd have a very short working distance. You would get some additional magnification, but not a lot.
The better solution is to add extension tubes. Since you have a 60mm macro (relatively short focal length), if you add 60mm of extension, you'd get another 1x, for a maximum of 2x magnification. Another possibility is to reverse your 50/1.8 on the end of your 60mm macro. That will get you a lot magnification.
07/27/2011 06:29:29 PM · #3
Hmmmm so if I get a ring and put that 50 on top of the 60 - I'll get the job done. I didn't know that. So since my 60 is still in contact with the camera, I should still be able to have all the electronics functioning right? If so, will it be accurate?

Thanks,

Originally posted by kirbic:

Add-on close-up lenses just enable a lens to focus closer than it normally can. A macro lens can already focus very close, so by adding a close-up lens, you'd have a very short working distance. You would get some additional magnification, but not a lot.
The better solution is to add extension tubes. Since you have a 60mm macro (relatively short focal length), if you add 60mm of extension, you'd get another 1x, for a maximum of 2x magnification. Another possibility is to reverse your 50/1.8 on the end of your 60mm macro. That will get you a lot magnification.
07/27/2011 06:54:09 PM · #4
Originally posted by kenskid:

Hmmmm so if I get a ring and put that 50 on top of the 60 - I'll get the job done. I didn't know that. So since my 60 is still in contact with the camera, I should still be able to have all the electronics functioning right? If so, will it be accurate?


Yes, your electronics will function, and should be accurate. I wouldn't try AF though ;-)
The one thing to look at is whether your 50/1.8 aperture is normally fully open or fully stopped down upon removal from the camera. If the latter, you'll need to figure out how to get it to stay wide open.
07/27/2011 07:24:46 PM · #5
Kenny,
just in case you like that reverse lens macro stuff ..... I spent $5 on a broken 50mm lens. The aperture is permanently stuck white open, which suited me just fine for this purpose.

Keep your eyes open at flea markets, second hand stores, etc.
07/27/2011 07:55:00 PM · #6
Grewat thanks....btw....my 50 can be adjusted with a dial when it is off the camera.

Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by kenskid:

Hmmmm so if I get a ring and put that 50 on top of the 60 - I'll get the job done. I didn't know that. So since my 60 is still in contact with the camera, I should still be able to have all the electronics functioning right? If so, will it be accurate?


Yes, your electronics will function, and should be accurate. I wouldn't try AF though ;-)
The one thing to look at is whether your 50/1.8 aperture is normally fully open or fully stopped down upon removal from the camera. If the latter, you'll need to figure out how to get it to stay wide open.

07/27/2011 10:00:37 PM · #7
Originally posted by kenskid:

Grewat thanks....btw....my 50 can be adjusted with a dial when it is off the camera.



FWIW, Nikon's are easy even if they don't have an aperture ring and are the G designation. All you need to do is wedge open the aperture lever that sticks out with a rolled up piece of paper or something.
08/01/2011 12:11:19 PM · #8
It is easy to set the aperture with Canon cameras too. Put the lens on the camera in the normal way, set your aperture where you want it in Av or M mode. WITHOUT TURNING THE CAMERA OFF, remove the lens from the camera. The aperture will remain at whatever size you had it set.

I used to do this a lot before I bought my macro lens, no problems.
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