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DPChallenge Forums >> Challenge Suggestions >> Anti Smoking Campaign
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05/13/2011 07:47:01 PM · #1
Make an anti smoking campaign ad.
Expert editing.

My Grandma has lung cancer from smoking and is not doing well at all. I know that there are others on here that dislike smoking and would like to do this as well as others that know someone who has died or is very sick from smoking. Or even educate the youth about the harms of smoking. I would also like to do this to help encourage those that do smoke to quit.

I'm sure many would have ideas but if not there are millions of ads to inspire your creation, here.
05/13/2011 08:10:25 PM · #2
I think I would be in for this. Hate cigarettes. Blech.

When I was a kid my mom would send me to the drugstore to buy her cigs with a note saying "Please sell my son Steven a pack of Kent Kings". When I was 13 she sent me without the note figuring they would sell them to me without the note at this point. I wandered around a bit without trying to buy them, and then came home telling her they wouldn't sell them to me. She got mad and said "You didn't even try! I'm never sending you to buy cigarettes for me again!" I was quite pleased at how that turned out.

She tried to quit many times over the years and finally kicked it for good about 20 years ago. Unfortunately, a daughter and one stepdaughter have now picked up the nasty habit. I'm sure with my own oldest it was an effort to try and fit in with others. So the battle continues.
05/16/2011 11:32:17 PM · #3
Go for it

My stepdad, his mum and brother have all died before their time (he was 44) from cancer caused by smoking :(

I think that photographing dissected lungs would get the message across but it may be a bit too yucky!
05/16/2011 11:34:06 PM · #4
Got my mom at 59 ! I'm in.
05/16/2011 11:43:58 PM · #5
but... but ... but...
' . substr('//3.bp.blogspot.com/_xfxmmOzXySs/SfA2Z-HFpuI/AAAAAAAAAko/ESGBPEiQ1cA/s400/anti+smoking+poster.jpg', strrpos('//3.bp.blogspot.com/_xfxmmOzXySs/SfA2Z-HFpuI/AAAAAAAAAko/ESGBPEiQ1cA/s400/anti+smoking+poster.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
05/16/2011 11:50:19 PM · #6
I think people already know how bad smoking is for you. My grandfather died of lung cancer.
To be quite honest I don't like the idea of it. People will smoke regardless; it is often a way of coping with stress. It isn't constructive or helpful. It is like alcohol, though they are harmful in different ways.
I quite dislike the social stigma placed on smokers. It is a superficial assessment of their character. One has to ask oneself, why is this person smoking? Immediately dismissing the smoker as a human being is not right.
Also, it can be quite moralistic. I think people should be able to do what they please (in regards to most things).

Instead, why not a challenge about the difficulties of life today and how this affects people? I would love to see some beautiful and simple but honest portraits.
05/17/2011 12:10:10 AM · #7
' . substr('//www.thegmanifesto.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/winning-tour-de-france-while-smoking.jpg', strrpos('//www.thegmanifesto.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/winning-tour-de-france-while-smoking.jpg', '/') + 1) . '
05/17/2011 12:44:19 AM · #8
I am impressed with CrazyDiamond's response to this challenge suggestion. I agree 100%.

My brother was in the hospital very ill ... due in large part to his smoking. He was not given the respect due him because his illness was seen as self inflicted .. interesting to note that his doctor and a few of the nurses were very obese. Their way of coping with stress but seen as (marginally) more accepted than smoking.

I grow weary of reformed smokers or reformed people recovering from any addiction as some of them tend to proselytize ... "if I can do it anyone can mentality" .. sigh. In my opinion, if the smokers are not invading your space, violating your rights, being respectful of where they light up, not discarding their butts improperly, then stay out of their lives unless you are willing to be judged on your own risky behaviors. Drinking, driving fast, unprotected sex and so on.

I have worked in the addiction field most of my life and I have never had a client change their coping skills due to fear or being treated like a second class citizen by being shamed.

Just my personal opinion and not meant to put down the OP's challenge suggestion.

05/17/2011 01:04:28 AM · #9
The Smokers

He lit the cigarette and smoked it down to the filter in one breath. He silently thanked the Winston Company for being thoughtful enough about his health to include a filter to protect him. So he lit up another. This time he didn't exhale the squeaky-clean filtered smoke, but just let it nestle in his lungs, filling his body with that good menthol flavor. Some more smokers knocked on his door and they came in and all started smoking with him.

"How wonderful it is that we're all smoking," he thought.

Everyone smoked and smoked and after they smoked they all talked about smoking and how nice it was that they were all smokers and then they smoked some more.

Smoke, smoke, smoke. They all sang "Smoke That Cigarette" and "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes." Then the smokers smoked one more cigarette and left him alone in his easy chair, about to relax and enjoy a nice quiet smoke. And then his lips fell off.

(from Steve Martin's Cruel Shoes)
05/17/2011 01:17:58 AM · #10
Originally posted by Saker:

I am impressed with CrazyDiamond's response to this challenge suggestion. I agree 100%.

My brother was in the hospital very ill ... due in large part to his smoking. He was not given the respect due him because his illness was seen as self inflicted .. interesting to note that his doctor and a few of the nurses were very obese. Their way of coping with stress but seen as (marginally) more accepted than smoking.

I grow weary of reformed smokers or reformed people recovering from any addiction as some of them tend to proselytize ... "if I can do it anyone can mentality" .. sigh. In my opinion, if the smokers are not invading your space, violating your rights, being respectful of where they light up, not discarding their butts improperly, then stay out of their lives unless you are willing to be judged on your own risky behaviors. Drinking, driving fast, unprotected sex and so on.

I have worked in the addiction field most of my life and I have never had a client change their coping skills due to fear or being treated like a second class citizen by being shamed.

Just my personal opinion and not meant to put down the OP's challenge suggestion.


Thanks Saker. I am glad you agree. And as you say it is seen as a self-inflicted illness. If the various difficulties of life were reduced, it is also highly likely that addictions would not be so widespread.
I am just sick of morality coming into this.
05/17/2011 02:07:34 AM · #11
FYI!

I am not getting at smokers, I have been a smoker, I smoked lots and wasted alot of money, quiting was the hardest thing I have ever had to do. I tried countless times to do it. My mum still smokes despite losing her husband to cancer. She too has tried to quit many times, she enjoys smoking but it is getting too expensive for her. I dont begrudge her for still smoking, I will do what I can to help her quit but if she starts again then so be it. I think that any damage would already be done to her lungs, etc...

My issue is that I have children and cannot bear the thought of finding one of them smoking. If a challenge like this was to go ahead I would enter with my children in mind.

Yes smokers know what damage they are doing to their bodies but Kids start smoking due to peer pressure and will do what I can to stop my kids giving in by realising just what it does to the body.
When smoking was the height of fassion, no body knew what damage it was doing, how addictive it is or how expensive it would get.

I ask all smokers, Do you want to quit? If you could turn back time, would you start in the first instance?
05/17/2011 02:09:59 AM · #12
Skewsme - so what exactly is your point?
05/17/2011 02:46:00 AM · #13
Originally posted by Saker:

I am impressed with CrazyDiamond's response to this challenge suggestion. I agree 100%.


Me too. I'm not too keen on these moralistic, holier than thou, type challenges. I'm not totally against them as i can see how they may reflect a real-life work brief, or more likely a school project, but they just make me feel icky really.

Message edited by author 2011-05-17 02:47:55.
05/17/2011 02:57:08 AM · #14
Originally posted by CrazyDiamond:

I don't like the idea of it. People will smoke regardless;


Are you trying to argue that anti-smoking campaigns are ineffective? If so, I would have to beg to differ. There is ample evidence to suggest otherwise, with smoking rates amongst many demographics in many countries around the world dropping significantly.
05/17/2011 03:23:19 AM · #15
Originally posted by Qiki:

Originally posted by CrazyDiamond:

I don't like the idea of it. People will smoke regardless;

Are you trying to argue that anti-smoking campaigns are ineffective? If so, I would have to beg to differ. There is ample evidence to suggest otherwise, with smoking rates amongst many demographics in many countries around the world dropping significantly.

I would argue that the INSANE taxes are what are responsible for the diminishing number of smokers. Money that is supposed to offset the cost of healthcare for the destitute lung cancer victims. Anyone who smoked for any length of time should automatically receive free healthcare from the state - they paid for it.

Nothing really wrong with anti-smoking campaigns though, but there is a degree of "thou shalt not" that tends to drive some people toward certain behaviors.

Originally posted by Saker:

My brother was in the hospital very ill ... due in large part to his smoking. He was not given the respect due him because his illness was seen as self inflicted .. interesting to note that his doctor and a few of the nurses were very obese. Their way of coping with stress but seen as (marginally) more accepted than smoking.

If only your brother did something smart and brave like go hiking or biking alone in a canyon and got his arm stuck between a couple rocks and had to cut it off - then they might have made a movie about him. ;-)

Point is I agree. People always do varying degrees of stupid things or various bad habits and ultimately pay some price for it. That's life.

-Ken
ex-pack-a-day smoker from age 13 to 30.
05/17/2011 08:44:16 AM · #16
Originally posted by CrazyDiamond:

I quite dislike the social stigma placed on smokers. It is a superficial assessment of their character. One has to ask oneself, why is this person smoking? Immediately dismissing the smoker as a human being is not right.

I don't perceive this at all. I am an ardent non-smoker and I don't think I have ever looked at smokers as less of a human being. I certainly have my own vices and shortcomings. I still find cigarette smoke distasteful in the extreme.

Perhaps of interest is a recent bill proposed in the Texas legislature that would ban smoking in most public establlishements. In spite of my not liking smoking, I feel this would be a draconian measure and totally unnecessary. It's been years since I have had any issues with second hand smoke drifting my way, and I think the last time was at a hotel restaurant in another state. Well, perhaps in a bar, but heck, I EXPECT it in such a place. Since I don't frequent bars, it's again not an issue for me. If the restaurants and bars feel that banning smoking will be financially beneficial to them, then those will become smoke-free environments. If not, then I can simply stay away from those places.

Message edited by author 2011-05-17 08:45:46.
05/17/2011 09:14:08 AM · #17
Originally posted by Yo_Spiff:

Perhaps of interest is a recent bill proposed in the Texas legislature that would ban smoking in most public establlishements. In spite of my not liking smoking, I feel this would be a draconian measure and totally unnecessary. It's been years since I have had any issues with second hand smoke drifting my way, and I think the last time was at a hotel restaurant in another state. Well, perhaps in a bar, but heck, I EXPECT it in such a place. Since I don't frequent bars, it's again not an issue for me. If the restaurants and bars feel that banning smoking will be financially beneficial to them, then those will become smoke-free environments. If not, then I can simply stay away from those places.


Interesting to read this. Tobacco advertising has been banned in Australia for 20 years or more and smoking in pretty much all buildings, restaurants, bars and many other public places has also been banned for some time. When the bans were first mooted there was predictable whining from the tobacco lobby about how it would send businesses to the wall etc etc. Did it? Nope! There is now a bill before parliament to compel tobacco companies to all use the same bland, generic packaging for their products, removing the last remaining marketing edge the tobacco companies have. Bring it on I say!

Oh, and for those who doubt the effectiveness of these sorts of anti-smoking measures - smoking rates in Australia have been halved since 1980 and are now down to somewhere around 17% of the population.
05/17/2011 09:44:41 AM · #18
Originally posted by Yo_Spiff:

Originally posted by CrazyDiamond:

I quite dislike the social stigma placed on smokers. It is a superficial assessment of their character. One has to ask oneself, why is this person smoking? Immediately dismissing the smoker as a human being is not right.

I don't perceive this at all. I am an ardent non-smoker and I don't think I have ever looked at smokers as less of a human being. I certainly have my own vices and shortcomings. I still find cigarette smoke distasteful in the extreme.

Perhaps of interest is a recent bill proposed in the Texas legislature that would ban smoking in most public establlishements. In spite of my not liking smoking, I feel this would be a draconian measure and totally unnecessary. It's been years since I have had any issues with second hand smoke drifting my way, and I think the last time was at a hotel restaurant in another state. Well, perhaps in a bar, but heck, I EXPECT it in such a place. Since I don't frequent bars, it's again not an issue for me. If the restaurants and bars feel that banning smoking will be financially beneficial to them, then those will become smoke-free environments. If not, then I can simply stay away from those places.


That ban is already in effect in most other states. In NJ & PA you cannot even smoke in outdoor places. For instance, at the Philadelphia Zoo you must actually leave the premises to have a cigarette. At Great Adventure in NJ there are little pavilions that are designated smoking areas. There is no smoking in bars or restaurants in NJ. The casinos had a big ol' fight with the government over the ban, and was able to keep a few areas where gambling could still be done while smoking.
05/17/2011 10:18:10 AM · #19
Originally posted by Qiki:


Oh, and for those who doubt the effectiveness of these sorts of anti-smoking measures - smoking rates in Australia have been halved since 1980 and are now down to somewhere around 17% of the population.


i think that whole 17% must be on the sunshine coast... last time i was back home it shocked me how many people i saw (especially young women) smoking... it seemed far more than my high school days even! (and i was a smoker who hung out with other smokers, as seems to be the way...) although at $15 a pack or there abouts i dont know how anyone can afford it there! although i live in california a large proportion of my friends are smokers (i quit about 5 years ago) so i am not unused to seeing ciggarettes around but it felt as though every person i saw on the street in oz had a smoke in their hand... i think the 17% may be the shrunk down figure of people who can afford to smoke a pack a day+ haha
05/17/2011 10:37:38 AM · #20
Originally posted by disassociation:

last time i was back home it shocked me how many people i saw (especially young women) smoking...


Well spotted on your part. Despite the reduction in smoking rates overall, the one group in which smoking rates are not diminshing as quickly as others is young women. It seems to be the group in which smoking is still seen by some as somewhat fashionable. Perhaps when all ciggies are in generic daggy drab olive packaging it might be a little less so. :)
05/18/2011 04:06:51 AM · #21
Exactly three weeks ago, we lost my mother to lung cancer. This was her second occurrence of the horrible disease, and the last year has been pure hell for all involved. Watching someone die a slow, miserable death is worthy of avoiding at all cost.

To all of you (not just those who posted), I hope that you do everything in your power to HELP every person on earth to never smoke again. If someone continues to drink and drive repeatedly, do we just say "oh, lets not embarrass the poor soul"? No, the goal is to educate the person out of self destruction. (Which is more cruel: pointing out behavior that is actively killing someone and helping them to STOP, or letting them continue destroying themselves and those around them?)

The first cigarettes I ever smoked were those of my mother, after I gave in to peer pressure as a teen. Thanks to the support of my wife and 3 daughters, I finally stopped more than 5 years ago. Unfortunately, several other loved ones do still smoke. The second they would walk away in tears after watching my mother gasping for air, they would go outside to light a cigarette to 'help ease their nerves'... it makes me want to scream at them to stop their self-destructive behavior, but that would only make it worse. Instead, we slowly encourage them to believe in themselves, to become aware of their own power to control their lives. Hopefully, we can help them before it is too late.

I haven't picked up a camera in a long time, as we've spent most of the last 8 months TRYING to ease my mother's constant and horrible pain. We had to move in with her, nearly losing our own home in the process. My brother lost his job while constantly tending to her. But the worst of all was watching the woman who gave you life agonizing every second of every day for months on end. While I am not yet ready to photograph anything for this subject, I vote whole-heartedly for this campaign (challenge) to be held.

05/18/2011 06:22:48 AM · #22
I understand the aversion to "preachy" photos. And I understand how it seems like a moralistic, holier than thou, type challenge.

But Clive also brings up a good point. It's like a school project.

If you approach it that way, and not look at it as people trying to impose their beliefs, morals, whatever, it's an incredible idea.

Photography is used by mass media to sell you something or to convince you of something. It's rare that photos on this site try to make a point. Right now we're trying to make good photos.

I think this idea, or crazydiamond's idea of a challenge about the difficulties of life today and how this affects people, something where you're trying to get a specific point across, would be an interesting challenge. We could use more photojournalism type challenges.
05/18/2011 08:46:31 AM · #23
Originally posted by rossbilly:

The second they would walk away in tears after watching my mother gasping for air, they would go outside to light a cigarette to 'help ease their nerves'...

That's really a sad thing. I feel for you.
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