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DPChallenge Forums >> Challenge Suggestions >> Posthumous Architectural
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02/23/2011 12:00:23 PM · #1
Inspired by this image from 21_F.gif neat:

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_936282.jpg

Take a picture of a structure in a way that emphasizes emotional content rather than form. Subject should be identifiable as a structure, and although human elements can appear in the image, it should be predominantly about the building.
02/23/2011 12:23:02 PM · #2
It would be a very interesting challenge, though particularly difficult.
02/23/2011 12:32:22 PM · #3
I have a shot in mind that I think would suit it. I actually shot it the other day and was thinking of getting it beat up on in the next freestudy.
02/23/2011 12:36:55 PM · #4
Great suggestion J. A definite challenge.
02/23/2011 02:29:23 PM · #5
It's been a while since an architectural challenge, and I thought this might be an interesting - and yes, difficult - twist. Would love to see how 21.gif ubique, 21.gif jmritz, et al would interpret this.
02/23/2011 02:45:07 PM · #6
What do you mean by "emphasizes emotional content rather than form"?
02/23/2011 02:54:05 PM · #7
Originally posted by gcoulson:

What do you mean by "emphasizes emotional content rather than form"?


x2, I see no emotional content in the OP's referenced shot, all I see is a slightly OOF, mediocre shot... Help me to understand what I'm missing.. (and I totally "get" the posthumous style, and even occasionally really like it, but this is clearly something that is different)
02/23/2011 03:22:35 PM · #8
Originally posted by gcoulson:

What do you mean by "emphasizes emotional content rather than form"?


Leverage the form to evoke emotion rather than documenting the structure.
02/23/2011 03:33:50 PM · #9


Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_904053.jpg Abstract, emphasis on the form. Enjoyable, but not emotive.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_856535.jpg Abstract; it's form, and tones, are emotive.

Both are my images, so my opinion will likely differ from others, but it reflects the intent of the images.

02/23/2011 03:34:13 PM · #10
Originally posted by bspurgeon:

Originally posted by gcoulson:

What do you mean by "emphasizes emotional content rather than form"?


Leverage the form to evoke emotion rather than documenting the structure.


Do you think the OP's image does this?
02/23/2011 03:53:53 PM · #11
I'm still not sure how a buildings structure and emotive correlate. You've provided two exceptional images, but I'd be hard pressed to tell which is emotive and which is not.

What do you define as "emotive" for an inanimate object?
02/23/2011 04:01:33 PM · #12
Originally posted by gcoulson:

I'm still not sure how a buildings structure and emotive correlate. You've provided two exceptional images, but I'd be hard pressed to tell which is emotive and which is not.

What do you define as "emotive" for an inanimate object?


That was my very question as I read through this thread . . .
02/23/2011 04:28:05 PM · #13
Light and tones can set a mood. Merge this with the structure.

My second image is one of loneliness/isolation. It may not apply to you, but that is my response to the image.
02/23/2011 04:32:15 PM · #14


Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_936282.jpg

Corey, I found it inviting, and I can honestly say that was my initial reaction. The glowing light is a major feature.
02/23/2011 04:34:50 PM · #15
Originally posted by gcoulson:

What do you define as "emotive" for an inanimate object?

maybe it would help if you could see whether you can associate one of the emotions with an image, or not. For instance, I guess the OP's example
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_936282.jpg
invokes fear, and Ben's second example,
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_856535.jpg
perhaps, enchantment, or pride. It actually would be a fun parlor game to guess what emotion each photographer wanted to express with his/her image (it can be hidden in the details during voting)

That said, it is a tough challenge to use architecture to express a wide gamut of emotions. I am assuming that most entries would go for "awe" with the most impressive piece of architecture they can find in their vicinity. :)

ETA: see how subjective it is? what invoked fear in me, Ben found "inviting". And what I called "pride", he used to express "loneliness". LOL

Message edited by author 2011-02-23 16:40:03.
02/23/2011 04:41:37 PM · #16
Originally posted by LevT:


ETA: see how subjective it is? what invoked fear in me, Ben found "inviting". And what I called "pride", he used to express "loneliness". LOL

I was thinking the exact same thing!
02/23/2011 07:03:54 PM · #17
Ok, I'm ready to put the "Voting Nightmare" stamp on this one. Could still be kinda fun, but.... *shrug*
02/23/2011 10:25:08 PM · #18
I started this post hours ago and had to do something, then completely forgot. Anyway...

In the original image I posted, it was clearly a picture of a structure; however, it did not make me think, wow! incredible building. It made me wonder what was going on there, who was in it, etc. I did not think of it as a "building" picture per se, but as an event picture of something happening in and/or around the building.

In terms of adding "emotion" to an image, we all use several ways through various techniques for other types of photograpy: lighting, shadows, oblique angles, etc. (which would not work very well for traditional architectural), would be ways of accomplishing this.

I agree this would be a challenging, um, challenge - especially for voting. But as long as the primary intent of the image is not just to capture the likeness of the building (which can be stunningly gorgeous), I think it can work.
02/23/2011 10:39:15 PM · #19
Silly question but what is it about this proposal that would have us call it a "Posthumous Architectural".

If we consider the "Posthumous Challenge" we had a while back, I for one was left with the very distinct impression that the "Posthumous" factor meant different things to different people.

I truly would love some enlightenment in this regard.

Ray
02/23/2011 10:56:47 PM · #20
Originally posted by RayEthier:

Silly question but what is it about this proposal that would have us call it a "Posthumous Architectural".

If we consider the "Posthumous Challenge" we had a while back, I for one was left with the very distinct impression that the "Posthumous" factor meant different things to different people.

I truly would love some enlightenment in this regard.

Ray


I think the topic is the substance, not the tittle of the challenge.
02/24/2011 12:14:05 AM · #21
@ Ray

I think that is a very fair questions, since trying to define "posthumous style" is sort of like trying to define porn. You know it when you see it.

Beyond that, I believe that PH images tend to be much more experimental in nature (in any number of ways, including all the aforementioned, but also type of camera used (Holgas et al), type of lens used (pinhole et al), processing techniques, etc. Perhaps it is safe to say that this type of image seeks to engage the viewer in a dialogue rather than present him/her with a one way monologue. Paul (21.gif ubique) calls them unfinished images. I think of them as open-ended images, with various interpretational possibilities. They are images that make us ask questions rather than acknowledge a known fact. They can be gritty but can also be breathtakingly clear and direct.

If anyone has a better description, by all means, chime in.
02/24/2011 01:07:25 AM · #22
Let's get some more examples out here to discuss.

I'd consider this to be emotivem but would others?
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_732258.jpg

I'd consider this to be emotivem but would others?
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_798829.jpg

I'd consider this be emotive, but some saw it as the person taking away from the architecture:
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_505471.jpg
02/24/2011 01:10:30 AM · #23
When I think "Posthumous Architectural" I envision a structure constructed entirely in the dark recesses of the photographer's mind, and the photo wouldn't include anything that looked like a building.

However, "Emotive Architecture", as described here, would be an interesting challenge.

02/24/2011 01:22:52 AM · #24
Originally posted by pointandshoot:

When I think "Posthumous Architectural" I envision a structure constructed entirely in the dark recesses of the photographer's mind, and the photo wouldn't include anything that looked like a building.

However, "Emotive Architecture", as described here, would be an interesting challenge.


I like that even better! Yes, an Emotive Architecture challenge.

@ levyj413, In the 3rd example, for me anyway, the human figure IS a significant part of the image, mainly due to his position within the composition and his relative size within it. But yes, when it comes to "emotional content", it is a very subjective thing. I don't find the first image particularly emotive, but the second one has a welcoming feeling. It's not what I had envisioned when I though of the challenge, but I could be convinced to include this.

Perhaps the challenge should be in b/w?
02/24/2011 01:23:26 AM · #25
PS - or maybe a truly PH Architectural, and try and deconstruction, well, constructions?
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