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12/10/2010 11:58:13 AM · #1
is there a real difference between a $25 tripod and a $200 tripod. if so whats the difference.
12/10/2010 11:59:36 AM · #2
Originally posted by Aleema:

whats the difference.


$175!
12/10/2010 12:04:43 PM · #3
OK, all humor aside, yes, there is a big difference. A $25 dollar tripod will be flimsy and will not provide anywhere near the stability of a more expensive unit. Once you get above about $125 for a tripod (referring to just the legs, not the head) you are typically paying for lower weight (e.g. carbon fiber). Good tripod heads can get *very* expensive, ranging from about $100 to well over $500. There are performance differences at all levels, but in general a $100 head will give adequate performance with lighter-weight equipment. Heads rated for heavy cameras/lenses, ultra-stable heads or special purpose heads (gimbal mounts, geared heads...) will be more.
So in the end, plan on spending around $100-$125 for legs, and another $100 for a decent head.

Message edited by author 2010-12-10 12:05:24.
12/10/2010 12:05:12 PM · #4
Now I am not the most experienced so I am sure others will come who will either correct me or know more.
But I think the main difference is the material it is made out of, with the more expensive tripods generally having lighter and sturdier material.

I just know that from personal experience. my brother was selling a tripod, and I wondered if I could buy it, and he laughed in my face and told me it was carbon fiber. I didn't know what that meant, but when he told me the price, it was definitely too high for me.

So probable:
material
sturdier
and I think expensive ones have a detachable head.

As said, very uninformed person giving you this information though :-)
12/10/2010 12:18:21 PM · #5
I've bought a couple of cheapo tripods and they were nothing but trouble. I Currently have a modified Manfrotto 785B ($79 US) and a Benro A-198EX ($134 US). Both are pretty good, though the Manfrotto was not originally intended to support a DSLR. I agree with Kirbic, once you get over $100 or so, the tripods are decent.
12/10/2010 12:20:44 PM · #6
I just want to add a thought to Captain ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Kirbic's post that you may want to think about the environment you will be using the tripod in. I had a very inexpensive tripod that completely objected to dirt from the mountains and sand at the beach, and ended up in the garbage can. So, I had to get a hardier (and more expensive) one to accommodate the inconveniences of nature (e.g. salt water, dirt and sand).

The type of shooting you will be doing while using your tripod may be a strong consideration for the amount of $$$ you want to spend and the choice of features you want the tripod to have.

Buy for what you do!

Just my two cents...;-)
12/10/2010 12:46:46 PM · #7
Well thanks everyone for the advice. Know any stores that give the best deals, online or bricks and mortar? I live in the northeast U.S.A

Message edited by author 2010-12-10 12:47:21.
12/10/2010 01:10:53 PM · #8
I got a Manfrotto 190XPRO - incredible versatility and stability. Well worth the extra money.
12/10/2010 04:29:04 PM · #9
Originally posted by hihosilver:

I just want to add a thought to Captain ' . substr('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', strrpos('//www.dpchallenge.com/images/user_icon/21.gif', '/') + 1) . ' Kirbic's post that you may want to think about the environment you will be using the tripod in. I had a very inexpensive tripod that completely objected to dirt from the mountains and sand at the beach, and ended up in the garbage can. So, I had to get a hardier (and more expensive) one to accommodate the inconveniences of nature (e.g. salt water, dirt and sand).

The type of shooting you will be doing while using your tripod may be a strong consideration for the amount of $$$ you want to spend and the choice of features you want the tripod to have.

Buy for what you do!

Just my two cents...;-)

Absolutely!

As for where to buy, try B&H. Lots of options, and their prices are usually pretty good too. If you find something you like, Google it and see if you can find a better price elsewhere. Just be careful who you buy from 'cuz some other retailers are... ummm... less then honest. :)


12/10/2010 11:07:43 PM · #10
It's like about anything else in the world of photography. You get what you pay for. A $25 tripod will work in a lot of cases. If you have a heavy camera, it might sag when you turn the camera vertical and shift the center of gravity, but if you futz with it for a while you can get what you want out of it. If you don't like having to futz with stuff to make it work, a more significant tripod might be in order. If you want a tripod that will last a long time, a more expensive tripod might be in order. My standard tripod rig is a leg and head combination that I have about $450 invested in. About $150 for the legs and another $300 for the head. I'll never have to replace it. $450 is a lot of $25 tripods though. But I don't have to futz with it :)
12/10/2010 11:12:49 PM · #11
I recommend staying away from the Martian tripods. I hear the disintegrator rays are pretty nasty.
12/10/2010 11:51:59 PM · #12
Several women have told me that I would make a good tripod. I don't get it.
12/11/2010 12:19:06 AM · #13
I have the Manfrotto 055xprob legs and it's a tripod I'll probably have my whole life. I love it.
12/11/2010 01:07:38 AM · #14
I guess it depends on what you need it for. Beyond that, a couple of other differences, having just upgraded from a "cheap" tripod. The most important, of course, is stability, and that it is hardy enough to steady your camera with your largest lens attached.

Other differences include legs that extend beyond the 45 degree (?) angle of the regular tripod stance. This allows you to set up with one or two legs on the ground and the others up against a wall or other surface, in tight spaces. Also, the collapsing levers on cheap tripods can really cause serious injury (mine clipped off the tip of my finger!!!!). And as others have mentioned, the heads themselves tend to be sturdier, and can be adjusted in far more directions on the higher end versions than the cheapies. But even cheap tripods have a place.

I saw a Manfrotto on sale today that weighed nothing, collapsed into practically nothing, and the head and support column it rested on was detachable - all of it fit into a backpack.
12/11/2010 02:33:28 AM · #15
I can't say enough good things about this Tripod, about $100 cheaper if ordered straight from the company rather than B&H, they will quickly ship from China. if you need a strong, lightweight tripod that will easily fit into your carry on luggage, check it out. Ebay has quite a few dealers also.

Message edited by author 2010-12-11 02:38:08.
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