DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Tips, Tricks, and Q&A >> A whole book on sharpening?
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 6 of 6, (reverse)
AuthorThread
08/05/2010 04:00:31 PM · #1
Believe it. This article hightlights some of points made in the book. An interesting read and it may have convinced me to get the book:
//www.photorepublik.com/articles/20100715/world-image-sharpening
08/05/2010 04:50:37 PM · #2
Hmm hmm. I've never heard sharpening get broken down in that way (multipass sharpening as capture, creative, and output sharpening), which is terminologically interesting, but I think that most people, at some stage in the development of their PP skills, learn this stuff anyway, even if not by those names. I can't say that the article makes me think I need to go out and buy this book.

What I did find most interesting, and what I didn't know much about before, is the idea of resizing in multiple steps. I hadn't been aware that it could make a significant difference in the way a web-resolution image looks. I do still wonder, though, if there's a significant difference between an image that's resized with bicubic sampling AND bicubic sharper vs. an image that's resized down to web-ready all at once and then USM'd or otherwise sharpened.
08/05/2010 04:57:58 PM · #3
$28 for the Kindle version is a bit pricey compared to the $31 print version.
08/06/2010 03:52:17 PM · #4
Adobe says that the Sharpening Tool has the best algorithym for sharpening of any of the sharpening tools.
08/06/2010 04:32:10 PM · #5
Originally posted by mycelium:

I do still wonder, though, if there's a significant difference between an image that's resized with bicubic sampling AND bicubic sharper vs. an image that's resized down to web-ready all at once and then USM'd or otherwise sharpened.


Often a big difference. Pick an image and give it a try. I have actions for both bicubic smooth and bicubic sharp. Some images look horrific with the bicubic sharp pathway.
08/06/2010 04:41:57 PM · #6
Originally posted by mycelium:

What I did find most interesting, and what I didn't know much about before, is the idea of resizing in multiple steps. I hadn't been aware that it could make a significant difference in the way a web-resolution image looks. I do still wonder, though, if there's a significant difference between an image that's resized with bicubic sampling AND bicubic sharper vs. an image that's resized down to web-ready all at once and then USM'd or otherwise sharpened.

From Marc Adamus on another forum:

I'll go over my web sharpening method first. This is very unconventional, but is now used by most people who I've showed it to. Use this technique to create ultra-sharp web sized images between 500 and 800 pixels.
- Take your full resolution image and reduce its size to between 1000 and 1500 pixels.
- Apply a "Sharpen" filter (easy, right?) two times.
- This creates a very noisy, oversharpened mid-size image.
- Reduce size again to the desired resolution, such as 700 pixels.
- And there you have it - ultra sharp appearance. But you have to make this work for each and every image. Some images require the "Sharpen filter" step at lower or higher resolutions, and occasionally, I will even apply this filter three times before reduction. Sometimes, slight additional adjustment to saturation levels is required post-sharpening. Other times, I will 'Lasso' specific areas that could benifit from further sharpening. Additionally, you can do touch-ups with a 'sharp brush'.
- This is the most effective method for web sharpening I have discovered, and basicly tricks PS into applying an ultra-fine USM.

Sharpening for print can require a different process. Here are some tips to keep in mind.

- I'm assuming most of you are only interested in sharpening methods for printing to ink papers or traditional photo papers, so I'll cover these.

- Always sharpen for the SIZE OF PRINT you are making. The amount of sharpening used for a 30x40 is not going to be the same as the amount used for an 8x12. When I process an image to print on my Epson at 8x12 inches, the very same image file would be very much oversharpened were I to use it later for a 30x40.

- Do not always sharpen the entire image uniformly, particularly if you feel noise or grain could be an issue in dark areas, skies or water. Make sure you are selecting the areas that need sharpening so you'll maintain a clean look. Click to 'print size', and then zoom in another click or two to give a rough idea of how much sharpening is required, and make sure you spot-check before sending it to the printer. Experiment! The fine-tuning of the printed image is a processing art unto itself.

- Some additional plug-ins that let you get the most out of your sharpening are PK Sharpener, and TLR pro sharpener (free download). Of course, go ahead and try my web-sharpen method here too. You might just be surprised at how well it works when the image is enlarged to double it's original resolution, and 'sharpen filtered' a few times before printing. Note that there is a full-resolution sample image available on my site in the "image quality" section.
I've never been one to take the textbook on PS for granted. I experiment, I invent, I do what works for me - or at least explore all my options first. Ask 10 different photographers and you'll get as many responses about sharpening for print. These are just some ideas to throw out there.


Pages:  
Current Server Time: 03/23/2019 10:28:24 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2019 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 03/23/2019 10:28:24 PM EDT.