DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Individual Photograph Discussion >> Spider Identification
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 22 of 22, (reverse)
AuthorThread
06/13/2010 12:40:40 AM · #1
Found this guy wandering around the kitchen this evening. I don't think I've ever seen one quite like it. Anyone have any idea what it might be? Oh, and he's probably about the size of a nickel toe to toe (maybe a touch bigger).

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_890795.jpg Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_890796.jpg

Message edited by author 2010-06-13 00:42:24.
06/13/2010 12:51:14 AM · #2
That appears to be an "Orb Weaving" spider common in New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, etc.
It could also be a brown recluse spider, but those tend to have longer, thinner legs.
Another possibility is the huntsman spider, also found in southern United States and Mexico.

If it is the orb weaver or huntsman, then you're safe.

ETA: After further inspection, that's almost definitely a huntsman spider.

Message edited by author 2010-06-13 00:55:32.
06/13/2010 01:03:09 AM · #3
Looks to me like possibly a Grass spider. Sort of hard to tell not knowing if the color is right or not. But that would be my guess.
06/13/2010 02:16:26 AM · #4
I think its a grass spider... very low risk...
06/13/2010 02:55:51 AM · #5
It's not a grass spider. They are not commonly found in southwest US (though it is possible) and grass spiders have much different skeletal structure and patterns.
06/13/2010 03:16:55 AM · #6
It seems very unlikely to me that it's a huntsman, as they tend to be tropical, or semi-tropical, spiders, not arid-climate spiders, and OP is in New Mexico.

R.

Message edited by author 2010-06-13 03:17:57.
06/13/2010 04:58:45 AM · #7
Bobby. His name is Bobby.
06/13/2010 05:47:23 AM · #8
looks a lot like the huntsman from this chart

us spiders
06/13/2010 08:08:37 AM · #9
Wolf spider, Schizocosa avida, image

There are about 175 species of wolf spiders world-wide. The wolf spider belongs to the Lycosidae family in the order Aranedia. The venom of the wolf spider is poisonous, but usually not overly harmful. Bites cause pain, inflammation, itchiness and tenderness. Lymph nodes may become swollen due to the immune system's defensive reaction to the invading venom.

Read more: Wolf Spider Bite Symptoms | eHow.com //www.ehow.com/about_5063657_wolf-spider-bite-symptoms.html#ixzz0qjcXiYRI Can be confused with the much more dangerous Brown Recluse.

Message edited by author 2010-06-13 08:18:28.
06/13/2010 08:12:52 AM · #10
Wolf spider

they are great, wont hurt you at all. I leave them alone in the house as they eat mossies and have the coolest web.
06/13/2010 08:26:32 AM · #11
Sure looks like a wolf spider. They have many flavors, but all 'hunt' their prey rather than using webs.

Here is one of my neighbors. She is about 4 inches long and does a great job and reducing the bug population.
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_890842.jpg

06/13/2010 09:25:02 AM · #12
I think I recently ran into the same spider .... in the middle of the night in South Texas. There were millions of them in a field and shining the torch around in the dark made all their eyes glint bright green.
06/13/2010 11:44:12 AM · #13
Thanks for the input everyone. It's certainly looking like a wolf spider to me, too, after checking out all the images.
06/13/2010 12:31:30 PM · #14
Originally posted by samchad:

I think I recently ran into the same spider .... in the middle of the night in South Texas. There were millions of them in a field and shining the torch around in the dark made all their eyes glint bright green.


That is definitely a huntsman, the 6 dots on the back and the thick legs are instant giveaways. I think the spider we're working with here could be either one, but the pattern on it's back doesn't seem to match the wolf spider or the huntsman.
06/13/2010 12:44:44 PM · #15
Arachnis Deathicus (trailer #2)
06/13/2010 01:10:15 PM · #16
Originally posted by Art Roflmao:

Bobby. His name is Bobby.


Hahahaha
06/13/2010 01:20:28 PM · #17
I still think it is a Wolf spider. Huntsman look more like crabs with the first 3 pair of legs angled forward. Good pics here

Interesting stuff, just for info about recluse..."The quickest way to positively identify if a spider might be a recluse spider is to examine the arrangement of the eyes. This requires some magnification. Recluse spiders have three pairs of eyes, a very unusual feature among spiders. Overwhelmingly, most spiders found in Colorado have four pairs. The arrangement of the eyes on the recluse spiders is one pair in the front, the other two along the sides, forming a semicircle." //www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05607.html

06/14/2010 04:35:22 AM · #18
I disagree with the Huntsman ID. I believe, based on the abdomen marking that this is not a Wolf Spider either, but in fact a Parson Spider. The build of the legs makes me think it is not a web building spider either, so the Grass/Funnel Web spiders are ruled out. Note there are eastern and western varieties, and the actual coloration varies, whereas the marking on the abdomen does not.
Parson Spider
ETA:
Based on your range, it wouldn't be too surprising for it to be either one, but proper ID to that level requires detailed examination.

Message edited by author 2010-06-14 04:39:14.
06/14/2010 10:15:27 AM · #19
Originally posted by spiritualspatula:

I disagree with the Huntsman ID. I believe, based on the abdomen marking that this is not a Wolf Spider either, but in fact a Parson Spider. The build of the legs makes me think it is not a web building spider either, so the Grass/Funnel Web spiders are ruled out. Note there are eastern and western varieties, and the actual coloration varies, whereas the marking on the abdomen does not.
Parson Spider
ETA:
Based on your range, it wouldn't be too surprising for it to be either one, but proper ID to that level requires detailed examination.


That's got to be it. The markings looked just like the ones on the Parson spider pictured in the link.
06/14/2010 11:05:03 AM · #20
Wow, yeah, that nails it. Ours was totally identical to the Parson image linked. The spatula wins!
06/14/2010 11:35:48 AM · #21
just want you to know that by opening this thread alone was a step in "deep therapy"...lol
06/14/2010 06:13:08 PM · #22
Glad to be of assistance. And for any of you out there that are wondering if it is dangerous, in the US you are relatively safe from any major effects of a spider bite unless you're dealing with a black widow female (very easy to identify, most don't actually realize what the male looks like, which is fine since he's harmless) or a species of recluse (which is widely, widely misidentified and causes mass hysteria periodically). Normal effects will be some itching and redness, soreness, maybe low swelling, while some individuals are more sensitive and these symptoms may be exacerbated. All in all not much worse than mosquito bites, if at all, since many spider bites do not inject venom. So don't be so terrified of spiders, since mosquitos are the ones that can give you nasty diseases and search you out ;)
The link that 21.gif dacrazyrn put up (//www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05607.html is a good one as far as information goes on recluses. Besides, I know the guy who wrote it and he's a pretty good guy :)

Message edited by author 2010-06-14 18:14:02.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 03/23/2019 08:37:04 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2019 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 03/23/2019 08:37:04 PM EDT.