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DPChallenge Forums >> Tutorials >> Non-Destructive Dodge and Burn
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01/13/2008 10:28:00 PM · #1
Post your comments, questions, and reviews for...

'Non-Destructive Dodge and Burn'
by Monique64

View this tutorial here.
01/13/2008 11:55:17 PM · #2
A little bump for me :)
01/14/2008 12:42:45 AM · #3
Thank you Ma'am!
01/14/2008 01:04:28 AM · #4
timely! I am just trying to learn how to do that exact thing! Thanks
01/14/2008 08:39:54 AM · #5
Nice work.

I use a similar approach, but I set the blend mode to "overlay" and use two layers, one to burn, and the other to dodge.
01/14/2008 11:11:16 AM · #6
This is fantastic. Thank you!
Spaz, too.
01/14/2008 11:39:41 AM · #7
Originally posted by Spazmo99:

Nice work.

I use a similar approach, but I set the blend mode to "overlay" and use two layers, one to burn, and the other to dodge.


Ditto. Usually "overlay", sometimes "soft light". The soft light layer is a little more subtle, probably works better for people.

And I'll do multiple layers of dodge sometimes, so I can fade in and out different areas of dodging; likewise for burn.

R.
01/14/2008 12:35:11 PM · #8
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by Spazmo99:

Nice work.

I use a similar approach, but I set the blend mode to "overlay" and use two layers, one to burn, and the other to dodge.


Ditto. Usually "overlay", sometimes "soft light". The soft light layer is a little more subtle, probably works better for people.

And I'll do multiple layers of dodge sometimes, so I can fade in and out different areas of dodging; likewise for burn.

R.


Most of the time I either use a "soft light" layer or a curves layer, although I tend to use curves for dodging more than burning for some odd reason.
01/26/2008 04:09:38 PM · #9
Looks like a great tutorial. I'd like to try it in PSP X2. Any thoughts? That 50% gray flag looks like it might be important, but I'm not sure if there's an equivalent in PSP. I should mention that I haven't done a lot with layers, so I'm climbing that learning curve also.
01/26/2008 07:06:04 PM · #10
Originally posted by bvy:

Looks like a great tutorial. I'd like to try it in PSP X2. Any thoughts? That 50% gray flag looks like it might be important, but I'm not sure if there's an equivalent in PSP. I should mention that I haven't done a lot with layers, so I'm climbing that learning curve also.

As long as PSP has blending modes, you can just fill a layer with 50% gray. It'll work the same as clicking the checkbox.
01/26/2008 08:15:02 PM · #11
Thanks. I'd be curious for someone with PSP X1 or X2 to try this. I can add the layer and I think I've figured out how to get the 50% gray. But if I try to doge/burn on that layer, there's no effect at all.
01/26/2008 08:29:09 PM · #12
Originally posted by bvy:

Thanks. I'd be curious for someone with PSP X1 or X2 to try this. I can add the layer and I think I've figured out how to get the 50% gray. But if I try to doge/burn on that layer, there's no effect at all.

Are you setting the blend mode to overlay, soft light, hard light, etc.?
01/26/2008 09:16:41 PM · #13
Originally posted by geoffb:

Are you setting the blend mode to overlay, soft light, hard light, etc.?


Yes. Soft light, hard light, etc. If I hide the background raster layer (the source image) I would expect to see the dodging/burning. But I don't see it there or on the image.
01/26/2008 09:22:52 PM · #14
Originally posted by bvy:

Originally posted by geoffb:

Are you setting the blend mode to overlay, soft light, hard light, etc.?


Yes. Soft light, hard light, etc. If I hide the background raster layer (the source image) I would expect to see the dodging/burning. But I don't see it there or on the image.


Just to confirm:

So you have a layer with your image data on it, and it's lowest in the stack. Next, you have a layer with 50% gray fill (or it can be transparent) on soft light (or some other overlay) blending mode. When you paint on that layer with black or white, the image isn't getting darker or lighter?
01/26/2008 09:51:17 PM · #15
Also check the opacity of the brush you are using when you dodge and burn.
01/26/2008 10:01:13 PM · #16
Originally posted by Monique64:

Also check the opacity of the brush you are using when you dodge and burn.


Yep. Been there too. Set it too the effect of paint-it-black -- no good. I'll keep playing with it and report back if/when I figure it out.
01/26/2008 10:04:55 PM · #17
Originally posted by bvy:

Originally posted by Monique64:

Also check the opacity of the brush you are using when you dodge and burn.


Yep. Been there too. Set it too the effect of paint-it-black -- no good. I'll keep playing with it and report back if/when I figure it out.

Does this help at all?

Soft light in PSP

Message edited by author 2008-01-26 22:05:04.
01/30/2008 09:43:48 PM · #18
Originally posted by geoffb:

Originally posted by bvy:

Originally posted by Monique64:

Also check the opacity of the brush you are using when you dodge and burn.


Yep. Been there too. Set it too the effect of paint-it-black -- no good. I'll keep playing with it and report back if/when I figure it out.

Does this help at all?

Soft light in PSP


Thanks for posting that. I tried it out. Apparently PSP X2 is a little different. For instance, when I tried flood filling the dupicate layer, it didn't fill the entire layer -- just portions of it, by color presumably.
04/25/2008 01:08:45 PM · #19
Since I am new in Post Prossesing... I d like you to answer this:

Why do you use a grey 50% layer? Could be a duplicate layer or a gradient or a red? Whats the difference?
04/25/2008 03:26:57 PM · #20
50% Gray is the neutral color for the overlay and soft light blending modes.
04/25/2008 06:29:42 PM · #21
Originally posted by ssocrates:

Why do you use a grey 50% layer? Could be a duplicate layer or a gradient or a red? Whats the difference?

The significance of the 50% grey scale layer is that it is completely non-destructive and changes made to it more naturally blend with the existing colors and tones below it. The other things you mention do not. A gradient or red layer probably would not work well at all as dodge and burn layers.

You ever notice those fake looking burned in skies with the ugly brown smog in some landscapes? Those are done(or should I say overdone) using the regular burn tool on a data layer. The 50% grey layer will have a much more natural result and has a built-in regulator that reduces the possibility of overdoing it. It doesn't eliminate screwing up but you have to work harder at it. ;)

Note:
In the tutorial it recommends setting the greyscale layer to "soft light" mode and paint with a brush in "normal" mode.

Try this... Leave the greyscale layer in "overlay" mode and paint black using a brush set to "darken" mode and paint white with the brush set to "lighten", "soft light" and/or "vivid light" modes. You might like the results even better.

Message edited by author 2008-04-26 09:15:26.
04/25/2008 06:35:22 PM · #22
Nice tutorial! Thanks you.
04/25/2008 08:45:02 PM · #23
Originally posted by ssocrates:

Since I am new in Post Prossesing... I d like you to answer this:

Why do you use a grey 50% layer? Could be a duplicate layer or a gradient or a red? Whats the difference?


It helps to understand how a layer set in "overlay" mode works; when set this way, everything in the layer that is DARKER than neutral gray will darken the image underneath, and everything LIGHTER than neutral gray will lighten the image underneath. So you make a new layer with neutral gray fill set to overlay mode and it has NO effect on the image underneath it. When you paint on it with black and white you darken and lighten, respectively, the areas beneath. You can control how MUCH you lighten and darken by adjusting the opacity of your brush. 100% opacity is just like painting black on, while something like 9-15% opacity is noticeable but relatively subtle. And you can paint back and forth over the same area building up density.

It's a great way to work.

R.
09/15/2008 06:53:33 PM · #24
excellent tutorial monique .. its a great way to dodge and burn .. thanx .. :)
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