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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Live View for dSLR camera...
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08/21/2007 05:40:32 PM · #1
It seems that some more recent dSLRs have now the Live View option, which seems to be unnecessary for such a camera, at least in my opinion. Maybe it might be useful in some certain situations (e.g, macro), but I'd rather look in the view finder when I am taking a picture.

In some recent Olympus dSLR, maybe the Live View mode is handy because the view finders are quite small. Now that Canon has announced the 40D with Live View Option, I wonder how large the success of such an option will be. I think some people might be disappointed since the Live View option is likely to be energy demanding and subsequently, the battery life will be shortened by a significant amount (any quantitative data to share?)

I am still not convinced about this option, but I might be a little too conservative to appreciate the benefits of it.

Can you tell us more about your views about the Live View option for dSLR?

Message edited by author 2007-08-21 17:41:31.
08/21/2007 05:45:52 PM · #2
shoot with the camera tethered in a studio, triggering it from a laptop. Compose a still life while being able to frame/ see everything from the camera perspective, rather than move/ shoot/ review/move shoot/ review.

have the camera plugged in to a power supply, so battery life isn't an issue.

Remote view a camera via wi-fi that's being triggered remotely.

macro work where the camera is in an awkward location to view through the finder (e.g., any time an angle finder would have made sense)

Here's a practical example.

Message edited by author 2007-08-21 17:48:03.
08/21/2007 05:47:08 PM · #3
Originally posted by msieglerfr:

but I'd rather look in the view finder when I am taking a picture.

...

I am still not convinced about this option, but I might be a little too conservative to appreciate the benefits of it.

Can you tell us more about your views about the Live View option for dSLR?


I rarely used it on the Nikon Coolpix 8700. It's just nt an option I need. However, I do know that it can be turned off, so I don't care if a camera has it or not :-)
08/21/2007 05:55:09 PM · #4
splain this one to me... through the lens is through the lens (off the mirror) what is Live View? What the Camera sees has to be recorded by something then xmitted through the system and then displayed on the LCD. Nothing more than EVF on the peashooters with inherent EVF lag...

Why would I want this? Maybe for some of what Gordon pointed out but I don't do either of those. So I won't pay more more for this gimmicky option...(like auto sensor cleaning)

Can't wait to be at the zoo and see the tourist with arms held out straight chimpin the back of his/her dSLR with a 70-200mm on there (in the bright sun no less)... :)
08/21/2007 06:14:53 PM · #5
Live view is in essence an EVF. I believe that manufacturers are going to start including it on all models of dslrs no matter what the brand is so most likely look for it on the next rebel too. I can definitely see the advantages of having it, but if you don't need it then just turn it off. It's not like the 40D costs any more than the 30D did when it came out anyway.

And seeing someone with a 40D + 70-200mm f/2.8L IS with arms held out? They would have to be one strong person...

Like I said in another thread, the intention of live view isn't supposed to be to turn the dslr into a P&S. It's to give the studio, macro, and astro guys another tool to make their work easier.
08/21/2007 06:22:23 PM · #6
Forget live view. What I want is a detachable wi-fi LCD screen. That way you can compose the shot using your optical viewfinder, but trigger the shutter and review the shot from anywhere in the room.
08/21/2007 06:25:49 PM · #7
I am not sure about how others feel, but on my R1 i have it on all the time. Its great help to know how the photo would look before you shoot it. Its a great help composing photos.
08/21/2007 06:29:57 PM · #8
What about the changes in terms of battery life when the live view is on? I think that should be an interesting point to mention? Any quantitative data?
08/21/2007 06:46:16 PM · #9
Originally posted by msieglerfr:

What about the changes in terms of battery life when the live view is on? I think that should be an interesting point to mention? Any quantitative data?


I'd hazard a guess at being roughly the same as when shooting - the same sensor is on. I can shoot about 3-4 hours continuously with one battery charge. But the battery life is not really that relevant for most of the target market I would think.

If you've ever shot tethered in a studio, the value of this should be pretty clear. In those scenarios, you'd plug the camera in anyway and either be connected to a TV or laptop. Not having to shoot then review would be a useful time saver.

Message edited by author 2007-08-21 18:48:57.
08/21/2007 06:52:19 PM · #10
Originally posted by jhonan:

Forget live view. What I want is a detachable wi-fi LCD screen. That way you can compose the shot using your optical viewfinder, but trigger the shutter and review the shot from anywhere in the room.


Buy a cheap DVD player, plug the camera in to that. Sure it isn't wi-fi but how far away do you really need to be ? :) You can get about a 7" review screen for your camera for about $70. If you had live view, that's a 7" in field live preview screen you can view at any angle you like. I got fed up crawling around on the ground trying to line up macro shots and this would be really useful.

Either that or plug in the wi-fi adapter and connect from a laptop.

Message edited by author 2007-08-21 18:58:18.
08/21/2007 06:54:01 PM · #11
The only thing I STILL miss from my previous point & shoot Canons is the swivel screen.

Live view on a screen that you can angle any which way is such a blessing!!! I don't like crawling on my belly to get certain shots, so I just used to twist the screen up and voila! Also brilliant for shooting over the heads of crowds.

The 40D's screen sadly doesn't move, but I'm hoping that the viewing angle will be wide enough to make the live view useful. If that's the case, then you'll learn to love it for certain shots, I'm sure. For the rest of the time simply turn it off.
08/21/2007 06:57:30 PM · #12
Originally posted by awpollard:

splain this one to me... through the lens is through the lens (off the mirror) what is Live View? What the Camera sees has to be recorded by something then xmitted through the system and then displayed on the LCD. Nothing more than EVF on the peashooters with inherent EVF lag...


Live view is the mirror locked up and capturing through the lens off the sensor, from what I remember reading. So it requires MLU and the viewfinder will be dark.
08/21/2007 07:08:13 PM · #13
Originally posted by jhonan:

Forget live view. What I want is a detachable wi-fi LCD screen. That way you can compose the shot using your optical viewfinder, but trigger the shutter and review the shot from anywhere in the room.


I believe that what you want exists. Look over the specs on the WFT-E2 (I think that's the correct nomenclature. In conjunction with the 1DsMkIII, I believe this can remotely control some camera functions, including getting a live view. At least that's how I read the 1DsIII release.
08/21/2007 07:11:48 PM · #14
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by jhonan:

Forget live view. What I want is a detachable wi-fi LCD screen. That way you can compose the shot using your optical viewfinder, but trigger the shutter and review the shot from anywhere in the room.


I believe that what you want exists. Look over the specs on the WFT-E2 (I think that's the correct nomenclature. In conjunction with the 1DsMkIII, I believe this can remotely control some camera functions, including getting a live view. At least that's how I read the 1DsIII release.


I know it was waaaaayyyy back in time at the start of this thread, but the example I posted is using live view and the WFT-E2 to get shots that weren't really previously possible, with the same level of control.
08/21/2007 07:25:06 PM · #15
I can't imagine taking photos with the camera at arm's length except in exceptional circumstances. However, when I shoot on a tripod I really miss live view. My back just can't take all the bending over the camera to see what I'm doing. It was bad enough when I was using the screen to compose, but I hate the extra bending to reach the viewfinder. And on the rare occasions when I have to use manual focus, I imaging live view would be a big help with the extra magnification it offers.
08/21/2007 07:32:54 PM · #16
I've said it before and I'll say it again. Live view is more or less useless unless it's a swivel screen. If you can see the back of the camera, then you should be able to look through the viewfinder (and get a much clearer image with which to focus).

A swivel screen would make tough angle shots relatively easy. Swivel screens are a good idea. Live view how it is now, is not. Unless of course you're in a studio, then maybe I can see it's usefullness.
08/21/2007 07:39:40 PM · #17
When I first "graduated" from my prosumer KM 7i, to the 7d, I missed the live view so much I didn't know how I would live without it. How great it was to actually see the exposure and make adjustments before taking the photo. Soon, I didn't miss it. Now I have live view on my FujiFilm S5 Pro.
I have yet to use it. One thing I still miss terribly about the 7i was the way the viewfinder would flip up so when I was on the ground taking photos, I could do it looking down into the viewfinder rather than putting my cheek on the dirt to look through it. I think my next investment for my S5 will be the right angle viewfinder attachment.

08/21/2007 07:42:50 PM · #18
21.gif Atropos, I agree that a swivel screen would made live view better. But it certainly isn't useless without it. I believe Olympus's first live view camera had a swivel screen, but they have stopped that. One has to wonder if they had a good reason to do so.
08/21/2007 11:21:45 PM · #19
Originally posted by Atropos:

A swivel screen would make tough angle shots relatively easy. Swivel screens are a good idea. Live view how it is now, is not. Unless of course you're in a studio, then maybe I can see it's usefullness.


Or the golf example in the second post ?
08/21/2007 11:53:48 PM · #20
In Live-View...is the CCD active during the view? What is being transmitted?
08/22/2007 12:10:19 AM · #21
Originally posted by msieglerfr:

Can you tell us more about your views about the Live View option for dSLR?

it's an added convenience - not something forced upon the user.
when audio (as with photography's visual) went digital, i embraced the added conveniences as well.
08/22/2007 12:12:47 AM · #22
Originally posted by Atropos:

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Live view is more or less useless unless it's a swivel screen. If you can see the back of the camera, then you should be able to look through the viewfinder


but a screen that doesnt rotate is still better at composing photos above heads and crowds than an optical viewfinder that your eyes cant see through. mind you, lcd screens usually have a fairly generous viewing angle allowed.
08/22/2007 01:04:59 AM · #23
I think I am starting to get this... after rereading Gordons post and following the linky.

It sounds like it is a wireless (using ADHOC (computer to computer network)) version of EOS Capture (cam tethered to computer via USB and you take pics). You strategically place the camera somewhere you can't use the viewfinder, sit back at a pewter make your settings and capture the shot.

Message edited by author 2007-08-22 01:05:26.
08/22/2007 09:36:49 AM · #24
Originally posted by awpollard:

It sounds like it is a wireless (using ADHOC (computer to computer network)) version of EOS Capture (cam tethered to computer via USB and you take pics). You strategically place the camera somewhere you can't use the viewfinder, sit back at a pewter make your settings and capture the shot.


Yup, exactly. Sounds useful to me. You can also connect to it via wifi if you have the transmitter on the body. So theoretically you could place the camera in China with a computer that's running remote desktop and trigger it from your couch.

Originally posted by PGerst:

In Live-View...is the CCD active during the view? What is being transmitted?


Yes, the sensor (CMOS in this case) would be active during live view. You are seeing what the sensor is "seeing" and therefore exactly the composition and focus you'll get when you hit that shutter button.
08/22/2007 10:07:39 AM · #25
Originally posted by SamDoe1:


Yes, the sensor (CMOS in this case) would be active during live view. You are seeing what the sensor is "seeing" and therefore exactly the composition and focus you'll get when you hit that shutter button.


Wonder what noise effect this has if the sensor is sitting there cooking for 10 seconds before the shot is actually taken.
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