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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Better than a LensCoat...
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03/03/2006 02:12:38 PM · #1
In case you don't know what a lenscoat is, it's a neoprene cover type thing that you put over your big white to camouflage it. Trouble is, they're not that cheap, and the one for the 100-400 looks kinda crappy, leaving lots of white on show.

So i spent a fiver on a good roll of non-shiny, non-residue-leaving fabric camouflage tape and had a go at it myself:
302639.jpg

What do ya reckon? Should i start my own business taping peoples' lenses up? :)
03/03/2006 02:18:17 PM · #2
What's that thing in the hot shoe??

And where did you get the tape?

Message edited by author 2006-03-03 14:19:17.
03/03/2006 02:20:59 PM · #3
If you slide it from fully extended 400mm to 100, does the tape roll up or have an adverse effect on the pump-action performance of the lense?

Your tape job definitely looks better than the LensCoat version (for the 100-400).
03/03/2006 02:25:05 PM · #4
Originally posted by dsmeth:

What's that thing in the hot shoe??

And where did you get the tape?


Looks like a bubble level.
03/03/2006 02:33:03 PM · #5
Edit:

Read Hanneke!!

:S

Message edited by author 2006-03-03 14:36:18.
03/03/2006 02:33:51 PM · #6
Originally posted by sysop:

Originally posted by dsmeth:

What's that thing in the hot shoe??

And where did you get the tape?


Looks like a bubble level.


Now that you mentioned it, it does look like a level.
03/03/2006 02:36:23 PM · #7
Originally posted by dsmeth:

What's that thing in the hot shoe??

A bubble level, quite a handy little thing to have around when you don't trust your tripod.

Originally posted by dsmeth:

And where did you get the tape?

Found it on ebay, but it's this stuff.

Originally posted by mattmac:

If you slide it from fully extended 400mm to 100, does the tape roll up or have an adverse effect on the pump-action performance of the lense?

Unfortunately it just leaves an area of white when i extend it to 400 - i was planning to just put a thin layer over the barrel and let the zoom slide over it, but there's almost zero clearance under the zoom tightening ring, not even enough for a thin bit of tape. Have yet to solve that problem. Any suggestions, short of painting the barrel?

Edit: tidying

Message edited by author 2006-03-03 14:37:22.
03/04/2006 07:43:25 PM · #8
While the LensCoat is not cheap niether are the lenses that I use them on including the 100-400. I did not spend $1400 on this lens and much more on others to have it look like a some bad paper mache project.

The cover serves several purposes for me; the camo breaks up the shape of the lens which is important for me while shooting some wildlife. The neoprene is waterproof and acts as an excellent thermal barrier and leaves no residue. And possibly most important is the protection that I get from the neoprene from the nicks, scratches, and scrapes etc. helping to preserve the value of my equipement which I quite often resell to get something better/different to suit my needs. I wouldn't think of going out with a new lens w/o a LensCoat on it. Forget the tape business.
03/04/2006 07:50:01 PM · #9
Why do I get the feeling that SimonD is affiliated with Lens Coat?
03/04/2006 11:16:42 PM · #10
Originally posted by SimonD:

I did not spend $1400 on this lens and much more on others to have it look like a some bad paper mache project.
...
the camo breaks up the shape of the lens
...
The neoprene is waterproof and acts as an excellent thermal barrier and leaves no residue. And possibly most important is the protection that I get from the neoprene from the nicks, scratches, and scrapes etc.

Actually, the tape doesn't leave great circles of white, so it actually breaks up the outline of the lens effectively rather just than adding a few bits of camo pattern for "a cool effect". The tape leaves no residue, and is a damn sight cheaper than the neoprene. Also, covering so much more of the lens, the fabric tape offers better overall protection... not to be too anti-lenscoat or anything...

Originally posted by kirbic:

Why do I get the feeling that SimonD is affiliated with Lens Coat?

Well, considering that he seems to have joined just to post on this thread... and here i am, not even selling a commercial product...

Message edited by author 2006-03-04 23:18:44.
03/04/2006 11:24:16 PM · #11
WHY?????

It's like all the idiots in the woods during hunting season wearing camo. It's a fashion statement and nothing else. With hunting it's the skill not the the clothes, I've proven that so many times. The same people who sell camo clothes must sell the lens coat, a good conversation piece. I know that many dissagree but if you think it looks good then do it, ... making it harder to see by wildlife, what a great laugh. If it were for real there would be companies that actually paint or powder coat the lenses and leave full functionality ... maybe there is ... hummmm a new business venture .. hummmm. Wildlife are not as stupid as we give them credit for ;) enjoy and feel good about your job, not bad looking.
03/05/2006 10:19:31 AM · #12
I am not a spokesman for LensCoat, I just don't like to see quality products being put down. Putting camo tape over your lens does provide some benefits as far as breaking up the shape but IMO provides as much protection as a paper bag. You save all kinds of money until you need to sell it.

Lens covers are far from a fashion statement as I pointed out in my previous post. LensCoat even makes covers in all black for nikon lenses because of the other benefits of covers. PhamtomEWO is right that it's the skill/technique that ultimately gets the shot but to say that camo doesn't help is ridiculous, it's just a grand conspiracy to sell more clothes etc. It's obvious that you have not the experience photographing wildlife to know better, unless you consider tigers and monkey's in cages at the zoo wildlife photography. He also doesn't mention anything about the other important points of lens covers like making it easier on your hands in cold weather, and providing protection for your expensive gear etc.

It's your equipement and your money do as you see fit.
03/05/2006 10:27:00 AM · #13
I still have the feeling of spokesperson.
03/05/2006 11:27:38 AM · #14
Here are a few reviews on the subject by professional wildlife photographers

http://www.naturephotographers.net/articles0206/gm0206-1.html

http://www.hoothollow.com/Tip-February%202006%20tip%202%20LensCoat%20Lens%20Coverings.html
03/05/2006 11:39:06 AM · #15
Originally posted by SimonD:

He also doesn't mention anything about the other important points of lens covers like making it easier on your hands in cold weather, and providing protection for your expensive gear etc.

Actually the only reason i decided to do the tape thing in the first place was to make the lens nicer to handle in cold weather, and it's done that very well. I am also rather dubious about the value of camouflaging a lens when you have a great big black camera body behind it, especially when the lens is likely to be pointed AT the subject you're trying to hide from :)
03/05/2006 01:21:12 PM · #16
Originally posted by SimonD:



It's your equipement and your money do as you see fit.


Originally posted by SimonD:
"It's obvious that you have not the experience photographing wildlife to know better, unless you consider tigers and monkey's in cages at the zoo wildlife photography"

"PhamtomEWO is right that it's the skill/technique that ultimately gets the shot "

"Putting camo tape over your lens does provide some benefits as far as breaking up the shape but IMO provides as much protection as a paper bag"

I knew this would stir things up and get blood boiling about over use of camo.

Yup great in war and if you are a sniper crawling thru the grass a needed accessory. Does it help in photography, to a point, about as much as putting deer scent on to cover your smell.

As far as photography of wildlife, well again lets not be mean, I very seldom photo animals in zoos. I do have extensive experience in hunting in Europe, Australia and the USA. In bow hunting the need to get close is a requirement, most of the time 5-60 yards is close enough. A good pair of soft soled tennis shoes or hiking boots, long sleeve shirt and a pair of worn levi's is all that's really needed. I now live in Texas but not from here and no desire to stay. Here everyone dresses in camo and then baits the deer all year, feeds them vitamins and then sit in a deer stand to shoot them. Come-on, camo ... a fashion statement at best. Is camo needed nope, does it help, slightly. The biggest issue is the shine and reflection of the lens and yup the "L" white lenses.

Helps when cold, sure.

I think they're a great idea for protection, especially if in the mountains, using rocks, trees and other hard objects to prop the camera on. Much better protection is bumbed or dropped. I think that's where the real value is.

Sure it can help but it really is a fashion statement more than anything. I frequently buy things because it looks cool, heck why do you think I drive a huge F-350 diesel truck ... because it looks cool and sometimes it's handy to pull bigger things. Have fun hide in the forest but don't forget the lens hood to hide some of the glass reflection and do something to cover up you tripod and dang now we need a shutter noise eliminator

IT'S ALL IN FUN, LETS'S NOT GET DEFENSIVE AND NAME CALLING

Message edited by author 2006-03-05 15:00:32.
03/05/2006 03:08:05 PM · #17
Originally posted by SimonD:

Here are a few reviews on the subject by professional wildlife photographers

http://www.naturephotographers.net/articles0206/gm0206-1.html

http://www.hoothollow.com/Tip-February%202006%20tip%202%20LensCoat%20Lens%20Coverings.html


I don't care either way, but it would be nice to see a review from someone who's not also a retailer of LensCoat products.
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