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11/06/2017 03:33:06 PM · #1
I started this new thread to talk about the Painterly Scenes challenge. I didnít like like the heavy use of digital filters. This is not intended to offend anyone but I think that the competition went over the boundary of Advanced editing
11/06/2017 03:41:30 PM · #2
Well this thread answered the question if it was legal so I'm guessing you are just asking whether we as a community enjoyed it?
11/06/2017 04:02:20 PM · #3
IMO the point is: did the filters alter some of the images too much? Yes. Of course just my two cents. But it's not a problem, I just wanted to say what I thought about it.
11/06/2017 04:24:41 PM · #4
It's a good discussion, and a useful one. When we wrote the current rules it was our explicit intention to whack out all the gray areas of what's "too much" and leave it up to the voters to make their preferences known.
11/06/2017 04:36:24 PM · #5
I think that something to consider (always) is the intention of the original proponent of the challenge. 21.gif GeorgesBogaert made it pretty clear that he wanted artistic manipulation and he followed through with his brilliant entry.

Message edited by author 2017-11-06 16:38:06.
11/06/2017 05:28:22 PM · #6
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

...leave it up to the voters to make their preferences known.

100% that.
11/06/2017 05:49:10 PM · #7
And now... we have "Inkerly".

I loved my "Painterly"... thought it fit well... and wasn't overly processed for the topic. Yet, it didn't do well.

But, now... Inkerly... what to do with that?!

11/06/2017 06:18:10 PM · #8
I am not a fan of these filters and I have voted accordingly.
11/06/2017 08:25:38 PM · #9
The distribution of the top five finishers is interesting.
1. Subtle effects
2. Extreme effects
3. Moderate effects
4. Very subtle (if any) effects
5. Very strong effects

This tells me there is a fairly even distribution of both tolerance and preference for HEAVY effects and NO effects. Am I misinterpreting? This seems fairly ideal to me.
11/06/2017 08:27:46 PM · #10
Originally posted by Art Roflmao:

The distribution of the top five finishers is interesting.
1. Subtle effects
2. Extreme effects
3. Moderate effects
4. Very subtle (if any) effects
5. Very strong effects

This tells me there is a fairly even distribution of both tolerance and preference for HEAVY effects and NO effects. Am I misinterpreting? This seems fairly ideal to me.


It IS ideal. Nobody is 100% happy :)
11/06/2017 09:12:54 PM · #11
Originally posted by tanguera:

It IS ideal. Nobody is 100% happy :)

Exactly. An even distribution of unhappiness. That's the goal.
11/07/2017 03:54:55 AM · #12
Personally I enjoyed the challenge. It represents a change to the norm. I agree that it's surprising the level of alteration that can be achieved under 'standard' editing.
In the end the voting decides and as pointed out the results are diverse. I was disappointed with my 14th place.. but perhaps I was heavy handed with the filter and should have backed it off a little.
11/07/2017 12:16:36 PM · #13
For me, I feel like a challenge asks the photographer a question, and I judge the photographer on their answer. In this case, the question is "how is your photo painterly?" If the answer is "because I put a paintbrush filter on it" then.... YAWN

but if the answer is "I used a photo that is transformed by this filter into something that looks like a painting," then that is more interesting and will get a higher vote. I gave Bogart a pretty high vote for this reason.

I'm at least as interested in photos with no filter that were able to simulate painterly qualities. Many painting do not have visible brushstrokes.

Most annoying (and the most banal answer of all) is the canvas texture. Just print your photo on a canvas.
11/07/2017 12:25:42 PM · #14
Originally posted by posthumous:

if the answer is "I used a photo that is transformed by this filter into something that looks like a painting," then that is more interesting ...

This is what I tried to do -- I used a filter which simulates an old photographic technique which I thought gave it an impressionistic(?) feel ...
11/07/2017 03:19:54 PM · #15
I don't want to talk about one picture prettier than another one; in the challenge there were many photos transformed in paintings with good results but the question is: where is the limit to apply the filters in an standard editing? I know is difficult to give a precise answer but in the last challenge (painterly) I didn't apply filters because I was scaried by a possible disqualify. In the next challenge "Inkerly" could I use heavy filters? Which is the borderline to avoid the fall into an expert editing?

OK I know My english is very bad :(
11/07/2017 03:36:41 PM · #16
Originally posted by Sisto:

I didn't apply filters because I was scaried by a possible disqualify. In the next challenge "Inkerly" could I use heavy filters? Which is the borderline to avoid the fall into an expert editing?

I think you're safe from being DQ'd for heavy use of filters in standard editing. You need only fear the voters if the use of filters does not produce a great result. :)
11/07/2017 04:28:19 PM · #17
Originally posted by Sisto:

I don't want to talk about one picture prettier than another one; in the challenge there were many photos transformed in paintings with good results but the question is: where is the limit to apply the filters in standard editing? I know is difficult to give a precise answer but in the last challenge (painterly) I didn't apply filters because I was scared of a possible disqualification. In the next challenge "Inkerly" could I use heavy filters? Which is the borderline to avoid the fall into an expert editing?

There's no actual limit on how heavily you can filter anymore. It's up to the voters to decide if they like what you have done. The only thing to worry about (in Standard Editing) is that the filter not produce a multiple-exposure effect; that would be allowed only in Extend3ed Editing. In other words, to cite one obvious example, "kaleidoscope" filters would not be allowed.
11/07/2017 05:40:28 PM · #18
Some of these 'paint replication' filters when applied to the max create blocks of color based on the highlights & shadows (take my profile pic for example), especially when trying to recreate some famous styles. My question is does this not represent creating a feature that was not present in the original and therefore illegal?
11/07/2017 07:38:36 PM · #19
Originally posted by MichaelC:

... does this not represent creating a feature that was not present in the original and therefore illegal?

That's not in the rules anymore.
11/07/2017 09:55:05 PM · #20
I used a few different techniques to get to my final result. Firstly, I wanted to use an image that would stand on its own. The other effects were used to satisfy the challenge in such a way that it didn't look like the painterly effects were straight out of the box. Some may think I went to far. The bottom line was that I enjoyed the exercise, I learned a few things an I liked the result.
11/20/2017 12:02:56 PM · #21
Originally posted by Sisto:

I started this new thread to talk about the Painterly Scenes challenge. I didnít like like the heavy use of digital filters. This is not intended to offend anyone but I think that the competition went over the boundary of Advanced editing


How else, do you achieve a "painterly" effect without the use of filters and plugins? If I take an image and alter it with the addition of layers upon layers, each with a different filter technique, I can simulate the appearance of Bob Ross and his palate. The end result represents, in some cases, days of work for the final result. So, what is the difference? Does it cross the line of being a "photograph," and become art? What is any less creative?
11/20/2017 12:35:15 PM · #22
Originally posted by rgrenaderphoto:

Originally posted by Sisto:

I started this new thread to talk about the Painterly Scenes challenge. I didnít like like the heavy use of digital filters. This is not intended to offend anyone but I think that the competition went over the boundary of Advanced editing


How else, do you achieve a "painterly" effect without the use of filters and plugins?

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_934644.jpg I've always though this looked "painterly" and it uses no "artistic" filters ... River Bend

I'm not objecting to filters (my own entry was significantly altered) but just pointing out that there are many ways to achieve a "painterly" effect.
11/20/2017 02:58:50 PM · #23
Originally posted by rgrenaderphoto:

Originally posted by Sisto:

I started this new thread to talk about the Painterly Scenes challenge. I didnít like like the heavy use of digital filters. This is not intended to offend anyone but I think that the competition went over the boundary of Advanced editing


How else, do you achieve a "painterly" effect without the use of filters and plugins? If I take an image and alter it with the addition of layers upon layers, each with a different filter technique, I can simulate the appearance of Bob Ross and his palate. The end result represents, in some cases, days of work for the final result. So, what is the difference? Does it cross the line of being a "photograph," and become art? What is any less creative?


This is the historic debate on this site regarding at what point does a photograph become something else. While there cannot possibly be an answer to it, the challenge themes should be the parameter for "how much" one uses a filter or photo-altering/adjusting method.

In "painterly scenes", the theme allowed a more liberal use of filters. Our editing rules used to be based on a nebulous gray area of enough/too much. Now we leave it up to the voters to decide.

But "painterly" scenes CAN be accomplished via lighting, scene, etc., with marginal, if any, post-processing filters applied.
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