DPChallenge: A Digital Photography Contest You are not logged in. (log in or register
 

DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> White Balance questions
Pages:  
Showing posts 1 - 16 of 16, (reverse)
AuthorThread
09/17/2017 03:22:14 PM · #1
So the new camera's white balance is incredibly different than the canon 7D's. So I'm trying to figure out my options.

I assumed that if I was doing a portrait shoot that I'd set the custom white balance, but I can't figure out how to do that with strobes. It looks like the videos are showing how to set it for natural lighting situations. (I don't have the camera now, so I'm not completely sure about that. But that's how it appears...)

Anyway, that brought up the following question:

If you're changing the white balance, do you just shoot a white color (or color checker) before the photos and just adjust it in post, or do you actually set the correct white balance before shooting?
09/17/2017 03:54:13 PM · #2
I think you could do it either way, but assuming you are shooting in RAW, I think it might be easier to shoot your white card and then just do a click WB in post. I could be wrong, though. I don't do studio work and usually the auto WB ends up being close to what I would choose anyway.
09/17/2017 05:32:32 PM · #3
If you set a custom WB by shooting a white/gray card (located where your subject is) then you are setting the "correct" WB -- that's the whole point of the technique. Not sure how doing that affects a RAW capture, though I can't see why it would make things worse.
09/17/2017 05:53:12 PM · #4
Good point. If I set the custom white balance, does it only affect jpgs, or does it affect the RAW files?

I assumed that it affected the starting point for the RAW files, as well. And I thought it would help in chimping.
09/17/2017 06:28:08 PM · #5
Originally posted by vawendy:

Good point. If I set the custom white balance, does it only affect jpgs, or does it affect the RAW files?

I assumed that it affected the starting point for the RAW files, as well. And I thought it would help in chimping.


- It will affect JPEGs
- It will affect the way images appear during on-camera review
- It will be recorded to the RAW file's metadata, but does not affect the RAW data in any way.
09/17/2017 07:23:34 PM · #6
Originally posted by kirbic:

- It will be recorded to the RAW file's metadata, but does not affect the RAW data in any way.

But be aware that you have the option in LR to display RAW images as set in camera, or to ignore camera settings in displaying RAW files.
09/17/2017 07:38:24 PM · #7
Thanks, guys. I'll go experiment.

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by kirbic:

- It will be recorded to the RAW file's metadata, but does not affect the RAW data in any way.

But be aware that you have the option in LR to display RAW images as set in camera, or to ignore camera settings in displaying RAW files.


Oooh... that's interesting...

I have lightroom, but no idea how to use it. (I got the photographer's bundle, but haven't bothered playing with it yet)
09/17/2017 08:10:58 PM · #8
Originally posted by kirbic:

Originally posted by vawendy:

Good point. If I set the custom white balance, does it only affect jpgs, or does it affect the RAW files?

I assumed that it affected the starting point for the RAW files, as well. And I thought it would help in chimping.


- It will affect JPEGs
- It will affect the way images appear during on-camera review
- It will be recorded to the RAW file's metadata, but does not affect the RAW data in any way.


I assume this would mean that it will already be set correctly in ACR when you edit it, in that ACR will use those settings as the default.
09/17/2017 08:12:01 PM · #9
i'm guessing you have a number of settings that can be saved on the camera. If you are talking about studio strobes being shot with no ambient light in the image it's a good idea to save a setting for studio work.

RAW
white balance (do a kelvin that matches your advised strobes colour)
Shutter - sync speed for your camera when using strobes (this can vary from 1/160, 1/200, 1/250 just check your camera for this)
Aperture - set the one you tend to use most (f8?)
ISO - generally low noise so ISO 200 which will give your strobes a stop more power than ISO100 but use ISO100 or lower if you need to cut out more ambient.
There should be a setting that pumps up the brightness of the EVF and Screen for viewing so initiate this so that you can compose well as the setting may darken the scene greatly as you are using flash for lighting
Face and eye detection for AF if you use it
etc etc

Save as a C1, C2, .... or whatever your camera has for this purpose.
Done.

Now just dial this in as your base mark whenever you do studio work.

Message edited by author 2017-09-18 20:03:42.
09/17/2017 11:10:38 PM · #10
Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

But be aware that you have the option in LR to display RAW images as set in camera, or to ignore camera settings in displaying RAW files.

Oooh... that's interesting...

I have lightroom, but no idea how to use it. (I got the photographer's bundle, but haven't bothered playing with it yet)

Actually, this "default to camera settings" is, as far as I know, available in any RAW processor. It certainly is in preferences in ACR, which is what you use if you work from Bridge. But you REALLY wanna start using LR more, it's a wonderful processor in its own right. It's got a nifty crop/rotate interface, the spot-removal tool is first-rate, it connects directly to your Niks and Topazes in the "Edit In" right-click drop-down, and it has a very sophisticated local-area editing tool that works like a more-customizable Nik U-point that you can go back to repeatedly.
09/18/2017 10:22:18 AM · #11
Originally posted by RamblinR:

i'm guessing you have a number of settings that can be saved on the camera. If you are talking about studio strobes being shot with no ambient light in the image it's a good idea to save a setting for studio work.

RAW
white balance (do a kelvin that matches your advised strobes collar)
Shutter - sync speed for strobes
Aperture - set the one you tend to use most (f8?)
ISO - generally low noise so ISO 200 which will give your strobes a stop more power than ISO100
There should be a setting that pumps up the brightness of the EVF and Screen for viewing so initiate this so that you can compose well as the setting may darken the scene greatly as you are using flash for lighting
Face and eye detection for AF if you use it
etc etc

Save as a C1, C2, .... or whatever your camera has for this purpose.
Done.

Now just dial this in as your base mark whenever you do studio work.


HUGE thanks! I didn't know that the lights would have a color rating. I set it to the 5600k and it looks SO much better!

And I knew I needed to be looking up the custom settings, but this was extremely helpful. Thanks heaps and loads!!

and if you think of anything else that fits in the "etc etc" area, please let me know. There's so many options on this camera. It's great hearing about what people have found useful.

09/18/2017 10:28:40 AM · #12
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by Bear_Music:

But be aware that you have the option in LR to display RAW images as set in camera, or to ignore camera settings in displaying RAW files.

Oooh... that's interesting...

I have lightroom, but no idea how to use it. (I got the photographer's bundle, but haven't bothered playing with it yet)

Actually, this "default to camera settings" is, as far as I know, available in any RAW processor. It certainly is in preferences in ACR, which is what you use if you work from Bridge. But you REALLY wanna start using LR more, it's a wonderful processor in its own right. It's got a nifty crop/rotate interface, the spot-removal tool is first-rate, it connects directly to your Niks and Topazes in the "Edit In" right-click drop-down, and it has a very sophisticated local-area editing tool that works like a more-customizable Nik U-point that you can go back to repeatedly.


Ok. It's time to start playing with it, then. I tried it when it first came out, and the way it organized files bugged the heck out of me. But I really did like the developing options better than the photoshop RAW processor. I need to grab a book, though. Moving around and finding things still isn't intuitively obvious to me. But you've definitely intrigued me.

Thanks for all the input. I really do love this place.

Oh wait. My rocks shot is at 4.8.

Ok, I really love this place -- at times. :P

Seriously, though. I love having good friends to go to for camera, software, puppy, etc., advice.
09/18/2017 10:45:05 AM · #13
Wendy, it is definitely a great idea to get a book on Lr; in particular it is worth reading about your options for configuring how Lr organizes photos. It's a really good thing to get that configured the way you prefer when you initially set up Lr, and Lr has a lot of flexibility. The defaults may not be what you personally prefer. A book is again valuable when getting used to the interface. It is a different kind of interface, but once you get accustomed to it, it becomes second nature.
09/18/2017 08:07:22 PM · #14
Glad you liked the studio setting idea.
As a heads up I have my first setting saved as my walk out the door don't know what I will shoot mode.
This brings the camera back to all basic settings for this purpose.
Very useful for these new cameras that have sooooo many settings that can be altered and tweaked.
09/18/2017 08:22:15 PM · #15
Need lightroom tutorials
You will love these
Just look for the one in regard to getting started with Lightroom and best settings etc.

Julieanne Kost - Lightroom Tutorials

Message edited by author 2017-09-18 20:22:33.
10/29/2017 04:13:35 PM · #16
I carry around an Xrite Colorchecker for iffy lighting situations to get the WB correct. Nice tool.
Pages:  
Current Server Time: 11/24/2017 07:59:56 PM

Please log in or register to post to the forums.


Home - Challenges - Community - League - Photos - Cameras - Lenses - Learn - Prints! - Help - Terms of Use - Privacy - Top ^
DPChallenge, and website content and design, Copyright © 2001-2017 Challenging Technologies, LLC.
All digital photo copyrights belong to the photographers and may not be used without permission.
Proudly hosted by Sargasso Networks. Current Server Time: 11/24/2017 07:59:56 PM EST.