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DPChallenge Forums >> Hardware and Software >> Sensible replacement for Canon T2i
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12/08/2014 10:53:44 PM · #1
Hello friends... I just sold my Canon T2i today with the intent on going a bit more "pro" level with the plan to buy the Canon 70d as it's replacement. I've sold all my lenses except for the Canon 70-300, 15-85, (pricey) and 50 prime. The first two cost me a fair amount, and as I understand it they won't work on a full-frame camera upgrade. So with the thought of keeping them, (cause I can't afford a new lens too) What are your thoughts on an upgrade that will increase the quality of the photos I was already getting. I have read that there are plenty of new perks about the 70d that out-class my old T2i, .. but picture quality isn't necessarily one of them. Any thoughts or help out there??? If you think the 70d is just the ticket... (or not) I'd like to know (and why, please) Thank you.
12/09/2014 07:04:58 AM · #2
The 70d isn't full frame. I'm sure it will perform better than the t2i. Especially in auto focus and iso noise. It will have some other features that make capturing your shot easier.

However don't expect a huge jump in picture iq..

If you want a canon full frame. You need to look at the 5d3 or 6d or 1dx.
12/09/2014 07:06:18 AM · #3
The 70d will accept 20th lenses you kept.
12/09/2014 10:36:55 AM · #4
No I don't want full frame.... because I'm told my current lenses will not work on a full frame camera.... but is a full frame camera the only way I'm gonna get significantly improved IQ?

Is the 70d a "good" step up from the T2i? Surely it's more toward a Pro level than the T5i isn't it?
12/09/2014 11:22:05 AM · #5
What kind of things do you shoot?

There's a distinct possibility image quality might be improved by either a technique change, a non-camera gear change, or a processing style change.

For example, if you shoot a lot of portraits you would vastly improve quality with some lights and light modifiers that are suited to the style you want to do.

If you shoot a lot of landscapes, and you keep your lenses clean and shoot at their optimal f-stop for sharpness, there might be techniques whether in processing or before clicking the shutter that would improve the quality of photos you're getting.

If you shoot a lot of night photos you would probably see an improvement by using a camera with a sensor known for excellent low-light performance (and/or a faster lens).
12/09/2014 11:31:28 AM · #6
what kind of improvement do you seek? i really doubt you will see any considerable increase in image quality going from a t21 to a 70D. unless you plan to make benefit of the improvements, for instance shooting at higher ISO.

what the 70D will offer you is more features, such as improved autofocus, a more robust build, easier control and settings, better rear screen, better video performance, etc. its a much more capable camera than what is offered in the rebel series.

you may feel like a pro with a newer more expensive camera, but you arent going to see a IQ jump if you plan to stick with a crop sensor, i'd look into better glass if the features of the t2i arent holding you back.

a full frame will offer you a vastly different experience. you have more control over dof and you will get more subject isolation as well as a very big increase in high iso noise control.

i never saw a big jump going from a rebel XS to a 60D, but the jump from the 60D to the 5d2 was enormous. even more so was when i started using really sharp glass and better lights.

12/09/2014 11:50:50 AM · #7
Without knowing your skill set, your photography goals, or your preferred subject, it's really hard to say. As others have pointed out, depending on WHY your images are not of the quality you want may have little or nothing to do with the equipment.

Getting a "better" camera will not automatically give you better quality images. I recommend you do a search on this site for images taken with your camera to see what others have been able to achieve with it. If they look better than what you were able to create, then you need to learn better technique. If they're not as good as yours then yes, you may have outgrown your camera.
12/09/2014 11:12:22 PM · #8
so perhaps I don't understand "full frame" and how it relates to better pictures. Isn't it just a larger sensor? And if I went to full frame I couldn't use the best lens I now own... which is the 15-85mm Canon. Frankly, .. some of my photos are good... especially post processed in Lightroom, which I have just purchased. The biggest issues I have found with my T2i is focusing... especially in group settings. (even with a small aperture btw.... such as F11) Of course, I then run into lack of light issues. I have started trying to get off of "P" mode and into manual. I think that forces me to learn real photography. I'm 67 years old, retired, and have pretty fixed finances. So, having sold my T2i, this next move will probably be my last. People have consistently commented that I "take good pictures" ... but that's in the eye IMO. (not necessarily the camera) And I take a LOT of shots, hoping for SOME to be exceptional.
12/09/2014 11:26:47 PM · #9
Not sure if you had done this, but step 1 for me when shooting with Canon autofocus is to re-locate the focusing operation to the button on the back of the camera.

Although your T2i had a lower end autofocus system than some cameras, most likely the problems could have been solved by setting a focus point and for the most part leaving it there as you worked the scene.

When you set the focus with a button, it's almost like manual focus but more versatile; you find a clear, easy subject to set focus on that's about the same distance as your subject will be from the camera, if not the actual subject. f/11 would make it a piece of cake, but nearer the wide end of the lens even f/4 or so is pretty deep.

Then you can shoot all you want and the camera won't try to hunt for a focus point unless you press or hold down the button again.

Improves the lag when you click the shutter button, too, and works well with tracking subjects moving towards you and shooting in burst mode most of the time (at least with a long and fast lens)

Have you considered the 7D? I believe it is a crop sensor so it will work with your lenses but it is more high end.
Also, do you have a hot-shoe flash unit? For photos of groups indoors or at least under a canopy you can bounce from, they do wonders.

12/10/2014 12:26:03 AM · #10
I agree with needing to know what you hope to achieve with the upgrade. I have a 50D and a T2i with no current desire to upgrade. My gear does what I need it to. I suppose if I were a professional, it might make sense to go FF for the low light benefits.

The T2i has slightly better image quality than the 50D as it is about 4 years newer technology and slightly higher resolution. For fast moving action, however, the Rebel does not cut it.
12/10/2014 12:28:41 AM · #11
Originally posted by hotbacon:

I have started trying to get off of "P" mode and into manual.

I typically shoot in Av mode. It gives me control over everything, but allows for fast shooting. I make other settings changes periodically as I feel they are warranted.
12/10/2014 01:56:10 AM · #12
Originally posted by MadMan2k:



Have you considered the 7D? I believe it is a crop sensor so it will work with your lenses but it is more high end.


I didn't think the 7D was much different thn the 7D and when I weighed them up against each other I chose the 70D. Can't remember why swung it - perhaps due to it being newer.

Anyway I really love the 70D and it was a super upgrade from the 50D
12/10/2014 03:08:41 AM · #13
As you have divested yourself of your canon camera it might pay to look at how much you can recover for you current lenses and take a look at some of the mirrorless offerings.
It really is worth a look at this time.

Bear has just moved to Sony
Others have moved to m43

It really it worth a look at this time.

Message edited by author 2014-12-10 03:09:29.
12/10/2014 08:18:36 AM · #14
Originally posted by Yo_Spiff:

Originally posted by hotbacon:

I have started trying to get off of "P" mode and into manual.

I typically shoot in Av mode. It gives me control over everything, but allows for fast shooting. I make other settings changes periodically as I feel they are warranted.

I'm with 21.gif Yo_Spiff on shooting primarily on Av. I found depth of field the most difficult to see in the viewfinder / back display. +1 on the other adjustments as needed - sometimes the camera will insist on a particular shutter speed that just isn't what you want.
I've owned a T1i and a 60D. I didn't expect the HUGE difference with the 70D. I feel like the with 70D, I'm finally getting close to what I used to get with my film AE1. Love the autofocus - especially it showing you exactly what it is focusing on. The updated processor is a big plus. The display is almost fast enough to actually be usable (even for focusing). I really like the camera.
12/10/2014 10:59:35 AM · #15
don't hesitate. The 70D I the better choice. I already took about 15.000 pictures with it. And it really marvels at low light situations where you need to go to very high ISO
12/10/2014 02:20:50 PM · #16
Has anyone heard about a Canon 70d version 2? And, in reference to "shooting everything in AV mode" ... I've tried that myself, cause I know a lot of folks use it, .. but it always sets such a slow shutter speed, that I get blurry photos.

When most of you (out there) use special modes (like M or AV etc...) do you also use them when using a flash??? Thanks folks!

Message edited by author 2014-12-10 17:00:03.
12/10/2014 02:24:59 PM · #17
the 70D just came out, canon doesn't usually issues marks 2's for the XXD line, they would just make the 80D next.

you could be referring to the 7D mark 2, which is a 1.6 crop sensor.
12/10/2014 05:01:15 PM · #18
Originally posted by GeorgesBogaert:

don't hesitate. The 70D I the better choice. I already took about 15.000 pictures with it. And it really marvels at low light situations where you need to go to very high ISO


Georges .... which lens are you shooting all these shots with?? Thanks
12/10/2014 05:08:23 PM · #19
I almost never use a flash, so can't speak to that.
However, Av setting slow shutter speed - to help that, increase the ISO setting or decrease the aperture or both. Usually I can hand-hold down to 1/15 or 1/30 (the VC lens helps there), so by using Av of around 6 - 7, and ISO 800 - 1600, I can get the shutter speed into that range or faster. To shoot moving subjects, you want at least 1/120 or higher, depending on the subject's speed.
If you want to shoot using f/10 or higher, you generally need very good, bright light to work with. On a cloudy day, f/10 might put you at around 1/10 - 1/25 shutter.
12/10/2014 08:47:32 PM · #20
Originally posted by hotbacon:

And, in reference to "shooting everything in AV mode" ... I've tried that myself, cause I know a lot of folks use it, .. but it always sets such a slow shutter speed, that I get blurry photos.

Av and Tv are considered semi-automatic modes. You have to adjust your setting as conditions change in order to maintain a decent shutter speed. If I see my shutter speed is dropping too low as I move into dimmer areas, I will either bump up my ISO or adjust the aperture to a lower F-stop value (wider, to let in more light)

Av doesn't mean the camera will compensate for all variables. I still have to make tweaks as conditions dictate, but it also means I don't have to randomly guess at manual exposure settings or drag out a light meter. Yet, I have some control over what the camera is doing. It's all a juggling act no matter what mode you use.
12/11/2014 09:59:46 AM · #21
i wish the camera had a feature where you can set an Av mode where you set minimum shutter speed and it ups the ISO to compensate.

i know i can do this with M and auto ISO, but the technique falls apart when you are in a well lit area and the camera cant lower the ISO and you need to raise the shutter to cut the light.
12/11/2014 11:45:13 AM · #22
Originally posted by Mike:

i wish the camera had a feature where you can set an Av mode where you set minimum shutter speed and it ups the ISO to compensate.

i know i can do this with M and auto ISO, but the technique falls apart when you are in a well lit area and the camera cant lower the ISO and you need to raise the shutter to cut the light.


My Fuji can work that way (set the lens aperture with the ring, set the shutter dial to A, set ISO to auto) and I thought it was cool but I don't use the feature much. 90% of the time it's on a tripod, so manual is the logical choice, and easy with the ring and dials.

With the Canons I would use Av and usually ISO 200 or 400 until the shutter speed was getting too slow then raise the ISO and go from there. If I saw the flashing shutter speed in the viewfinder I'd lower it.
12/12/2014 12:09:13 PM · #23
Hello again... I'm the guy that started this thread... my original question really hasn't been addressed IMO .... what camera is a good image quality update to my old T2i? I went to Best Buy yesterday and looked at the 70D again... but the sales (kid) couldn't get it to come on... (great way to sell cameras, huh?) Any way, ... he also pointed me to the 7D, also to the 6D ... then over to the Nikon 7100. Talk about confusion!! I kept asking about what happens if I use my Canon 15-85mm lens on a full frame camera? What will the results be? This lens is the best lens I own, which I kept for the purpose of using on the 70D (if that's what I get)

So, I guess to make all the above make sense to people who may answer here.... IS 70d a good upgrade to my T2i ... or is there another model I should look at? I'm 67, and probably won't get another camera after which ever one I buy... so I want my choice to be the right one.

70d... 7d, .. 6d ... Nikon ... what??? Good video is nice, .. but my goal is quality photos. Thanks (btw, I primarily shoot landscapes, .. but am also asked to shoot people events quite often... such as at church)

Message edited by author 2014-12-12 12:11:50.
12/12/2014 12:27:34 PM · #24
I vote 70D
12/12/2014 12:28:02 PM · #25
Originally posted by hotbacon:

... I kept asking about what happens if I use my Canon 15-85mm lens on a full frame camera? What will the results be?


I am not sure what camera you should get, but I know your Canon 15-18mm lens has an EF-S mount. This cannot be mounted on the full frame camera. You need lenses with an EF mount for the full frame bodies. An EF lens can be put on full frame and crop sensor cameras. EF-S lenses will only mount on crop sensor bodies.
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