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08/05/2011 03:22:31 PM · #1
Umm, am I the only one who doesn't quite understand what the Horizontal vs. Vertical challenge is all about?
I just don't get what its asking for! Anyone care explaining?
08/05/2011 03:30:47 PM · #2
They're not the greatest shots in the world but I was thinking that something like this is what they meant:

Vertical shot of something horizontal:

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_965566.jpg

Horizontal shot of something vertical:

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_821037.jpg

Message edited by author 2011-08-05 15:33:29.
08/05/2011 03:34:11 PM · #3
Originally posted by Fiora:

Umm, am I the only one who doesn't quite understand what the Horizontal vs. Vertical challenge is all about?
I just don't get what its asking for! Anyone care explaining?


In a nutshell; shoot a skyscraper with the camera in landscape orientation, or shoot a wide angle seascape with a strong ocean horizon in portrait orientation. Those are just two obvious examples, of course, but it's an exercise in counter-intuitive framing of scenes. Run with it! Have fun!

R.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_222641.jpg

Message edited by author 2011-08-05 15:38:18.
08/05/2011 03:57:14 PM · #4
For the remedial photographers among us (perhaps just me), can someone help flesh out the list of horizontal and vertical subjects?

Horizontal subjects: landscapes, seascapes...

Vertical subjects: skyscrapers, LaBron James...
08/05/2011 04:27:18 PM · #5
Just take any subject that screams out for a vertical framing, and do it instead with a horizontal framiong, and make it *work*, and you'll be golden. There's lots of room for imagination here.

R.
08/05/2011 04:34:37 PM · #6
Gonna be a lot of Rule of Thirds use here I believe.
08/05/2011 04:37:46 PM · #7
I'm having problems with photos that contain both elements. For instance, would either of these work? The subject itself is vertical in both images, yet there's a strong horizontal element.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_908657.jpg Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_929052.jpg
08/05/2011 04:39:29 PM · #8
Fiora, thanks for asking the question. My brain was going in a completely different and strange direction. This makes so much more sense!
08/05/2011 05:06:00 PM · #9
Originally posted by vawendy:

I'm having problems with photos that contain both elements. For instance, would either of these work? The subject itself is vertical in both images, yet there's a strong horizontal element.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_908657.jpg
This qualifies, it is a horizontal image(landscape) of a virtical element(tree) creates the VS since usually horizontal photos are of horizontal elements(sunsets) and Verticle images are of verticle elements(people standing).
08/05/2011 05:10:41 PM · #10
Yah, Wendy's tree is a fine example of this principle in action with a landscape shot. There WILL be other approaches, but that's certainly a valid one.

R.
08/05/2011 05:12:28 PM · #11
Originally posted by Bear_Music:

Yah, Wendy's tree is a fine example of this principle in action with a landscape shot. There WILL be other approaches, but that's certainly a valid one.

R.


That's what I thought. Every shot that I had that was vertical in a horizontal photo had a strong horizon line, so I started getting concerned. :)

I know exactly what I want to do, but I don't know I'll find one in time.
08/05/2011 05:13:34 PM · #12
Ok, that makes more sense to me now. Thanks! Especially looking at the examples helped
08/06/2011 09:36:07 PM · #13
Well I was thinking more along the lines of, say a human being who is a vertical subject, could be photographed lying down, and or a animal who is generally a horizontal object could be photographed in a vertical position. Did anyone else have those thoughts?
08/06/2011 09:48:08 PM · #14
Originally posted by Neat:

Well I was thinking more along the lines of, say a human being who is a vertical subject, could be photographed lying down, and or a animal who is generally a horizontal object could be photographed in a vertical position. Did anyone else have those thoughts?


Imo, I think you'll get hit for that. A person is only a vertical being when they're vertical. If they're laying down, they're a horizontal subject....
08/06/2011 09:56:07 PM · #15
Challenge descritption: Make a vertical shot of a horizontal subject, OR a horizontal shot of a vertical subject. A person is a vertical subject, but shot in a horizontal form.

Everyone intreprets differently I'm aware, but thats how i read it.

Message edited by author 2011-08-06 21:56:31.
08/06/2011 09:56:16 PM · #16
Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by Neat:

Well I was thinking more along the lines of, say a human being who is a vertical subject, could be photographed lying down, and or a animal who is generally a horizontal object could be photographed in a vertical position. Did anyone else have those thoughts?


Imo, I think you'll get hit for that. A person is only a vertical being when they're vertical. If they're laying down, they're a horizontal subject....

I am sitting now - am I vertical AND horizontal? ;) I think Anita has a point, I have seen trees growing horizontally (almost) while the general expectation is they would be vertical. But then it would be very difficult to come up with valid examples so my final take is to photograph vertical objects in Landscape and horizontal in Portrait as per Bear's example in the original Challenge Suggestion.
08/06/2011 09:58:57 PM · #17
Originally posted by MargaretN:

Originally posted by vawendy:

Originally posted by Neat:

Well I was thinking more along the lines of, say a human being who is a vertical subject, could be photographed lying down, and or a animal who is generally a horizontal object could be photographed in a vertical position. Did anyone else have those thoughts?


Imo, I think you'll get hit for that. A person is only a vertical being when they're vertical. If they're laying down, they're a horizontal subject....

I am sitting now - am I vertical AND horizontal? ;) I think Anita has a point, I have seen trees growing horizontally (almost) while the general expectation is they would be vertical. But then it would be very difficult to come up with valid examples so my final take is to photograph vertical objects in Landscape and horizontal in Portrait as per Bear's example in the original Challenge Suggestion.


Technically, at least the way I'm sitting, I'm vertical, horizontal, vertical. :)

But that's just too complicated, so I go think I'll be horizontal! :D

G'nite all!

Message edited by author 2011-08-06 21:59:35.
08/06/2011 10:25:32 PM · #18
I thought it was supposed to be taking a photo of say a beach scene (in landscape mode) but turning it so it is horizontal. The trick there would be to find a subject that would look good doing that. Like maybe an interesting tree with a person on a hammock and turn it so the person looks like they're hanging from a tree branch.

I don't know that's what I thought it meant. And if anyone wants to use that idea they may. I'm probably not entering this one.
08/06/2011 10:47:00 PM · #19
Originally posted by Sheryll:

I thought it was supposed to be taking a photo of say a beach scene (in landscape mode) but turning it so it is horizontal. The trick there would be to find a subject that would look good doing that. Like maybe an interesting tree with a person on a hammock and turn it so the person looks like they're hanging from a tree branch.

I don't know that's what I thought it meant. And if anyone wants to use that idea they may. I'm probably not entering this one.

You mean like these:
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_891009.jpg . Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_935446.jpg
08/06/2011 10:57:24 PM · #20
Originally posted by TheDruid:

Originally posted by vawendy:

I'm having problems with photos that contain both elements. For instance, would either of these work? The subject itself is vertical in both images, yet there's a strong horizontal element.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_908657.jpg
This qualifies, it is a horizontal image(landscape) of a virtical element(tree) creates the VS since usually horizontal photos are of horizontal elements(sunsets) and Verticle images are of verticle elements(people standing).

Hmmm...wouldn't that shot be usually taken in landscape orientation? A large percentage of photos I've seen with a solo tree in it are in landscape rather portrait view.

eta - I was reading something into the challenge description that wasn't there. Technically, this example would be a horizontal capture of a vertical subject, although not quite unique or different is what I'm trying to say (nothing against the photo, it's lovely).

Message edited by author 2011-08-06 23:00:55.
08/06/2011 11:15:17 PM · #21
Originally posted by MargaretN:

Originally posted by Sheryll:

I thought it was supposed to be taking a photo of say a beach scene (in landscape mode) but turning it so it is horizontal. The trick there would be to find a subject that would look good doing that. Like maybe an interesting tree with a person on a hammock and turn it so the person looks like they're hanging from a tree branch.

I don't know that's what I thought it meant. And if anyone wants to use that idea they may. I'm probably not entering this one.

You mean like these:
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_891009.jpg . Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_935446.jpg


Yes. that's what I was thinking. I don't know if that's right or not but, that's what I thought it was supposed to be.
08/06/2011 11:48:42 PM · #22
For some examples of landscapes and people that would fit, look at these old challenges:
Landscape in Portrait Orientation
Portait in Landscape Orientation

There are plenty of other options, but that should give you the idea.
08/07/2011 12:03:58 AM · #23
Originally posted by Sheryll:

Originally posted by MargaretN:

Originally posted by Sheryll:

I thought it was supposed to be taking a photo of say a beach scene (in landscape mode) but turning it so it is horizontal. The trick there would be to find a subject that would look good doing that. Like maybe an interesting tree with a person on a hammock and turn it so the person looks like they're hanging from a tree branch.

I don't know that's what I thought it meant. And if anyone wants to use that idea they may. I'm probably not entering this one.

You mean like these:
Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_891009.jpg . Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_935446.jpg


Yes. that's what I was thinking. I don't know if that's right or not but, that's what I thought it was supposed to be.

That is exactly the way I interpreted it. I guess 21.gif Bear_Music and I had totally different ideas of this one. I was going to be looking for objects that are usually horizontal to be photographed/PP'd vertically and vice versa, not just framed in a different way. It is far more interesting being the object not just the framing!
08/07/2011 12:14:03 AM · #24
Originally posted by supanova:

I guess 21.gif Bear_Music and I had totally different ideas of this one. I was going to be looking for objects that are usually horizontal to be photographed/PP'd vertically and vice versa, not just framed in a different way. It is far more interesting being the object not just the framing!


"My" idea was just my representation of the conventional approach; this other approach, of turning images on their sides, is equally valid IMO, and in fact I may be doing one like that. And I can think of at l;east two other ways to approach this challenge. It's a very interesting challenge, perceptually; I expect to see a number of fascinating images.

R.
08/07/2011 12:39:43 AM · #25
This is very fast moving towards a free study :)
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