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DPChallenge Forums >> Photography Discussion >> Amazing High-speed photography
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Showing posts 1 - 25 of 26, (reverse)
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06/08/2011 12:38:13 PM · #1
Amazing High-speed Photography! Well worth looking through his portfolio.
06/08/2011 12:50:52 PM · #2
I find this stuff fascinating.
06/08/2011 12:58:13 PM · #3
Those water drop shots are CRAZY
06/08/2011 01:11:05 PM · #4
This guy too does breathtaking waterdrops...
06/08/2011 05:20:49 PM · #5
Originally posted by gattamarta:

This guy too does breathtaking waterdrops...


Thanks for that, most of them are 1cm in height!
06/08/2011 05:59:44 PM · #6
Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by gattamarta:

This guy too does breathtaking waterdrops...


Thanks for that, most of them are 1cm in height!


Click on the small photos or left and right arrows to see that at a decent size.

Message edited by author 2011-06-08 18:01:30.
06/08/2011 06:13:25 PM · #7
I'm wondering what kind of shutter speed you need to stop a bullet in flight
06/08/2011 06:28:36 PM · #8
Anti-21_F.gif IreneM photographer :-|
06/08/2011 06:50:44 PM · #9
Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by gattamarta:

This guy too does breathtaking waterdrops...


Thanks for that, most of them are 1cm in height!


Click on the small photos or left and right arrows to see that at a decent size.


I actually meant the water drops lol, there's one of them with a 10mm ruler next to it and it only just reaches the top of it!
06/08/2011 07:57:21 PM · #10
Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by gattamarta:

This guy too does breathtaking waterdrops...


Thanks for that, most of them are 1cm in height!


Click on the small photos or left and right arrows to see that at a decent size.


I actually meant the water drops lol, there's one of them with a 10mm ruler next to it and it only just reaches the top of it!


As soon as I posted that I thought I'd probably got it wrong. I didn't notice the ruler.
06/08/2011 09:47:03 PM · #11
Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by gattamarta:

This guy too does breathtaking waterdrops...


Thanks for that, most of them are 1cm in height!


Click on the small photos or left and right arrows to see that at a decent size.


I actually meant the water drops lol, there's one of them with a 10mm ruler next to it and it only just reaches the top of it!


I probably wouldn't let a gun this close to my camera, let alone a speeding bullet! That photog sure has trust in whoever/whatever is firing that gun...or really flexible insurance : )
06/08/2011 09:59:52 PM · #12
Originally posted by curtpetguy:

I'm wondering what kind of shutter speed you need to stop a bullet in flight


It is not the shutter speed that matters in these shots, but the flash duration.
The shutter is open for longer than the time it takes for the bullet to pass, but the flash is triggered (and lasts much shorter in duration than the shutter) as the bullet passes, so the scene is dark except for what is illuminated by the flash. You just underexpose the ambient by at least 2 stops.

Message edited by author 2011-06-08 22:01:57.
06/08/2011 11:50:31 PM · #13
I like his last two the best. other than that, i didn't LOVE the other things. :/ (sorry...)
06/08/2011 11:52:14 PM · #14
I'm curious what kind of pellet is shaped like that and is slightly bigger than a waterdrop?
06/09/2011 02:51:44 AM · #15
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

I'm curious what kind of pellet is shaped like that and is slightly bigger than a waterdrop?


I think they're something homemade and/or fired from an airgun at low speed (relative to a real bullet fired from an actual firearm).

To really freeze a bullet in mid-flight, a flash duration on the order of a microsecond (or less) is required. That's not really possible with a typical xenon flash tube. That, and the odd shape lead me to my conclusion.
06/09/2011 10:46:00 AM · #16
now irene's gonna get a gun ;-)
06/09/2011 12:02:31 PM · #17
Originally posted by Spork99:

Originally posted by DrAchoo:

I'm curious what kind of pellet is shaped like that and is slightly bigger than a waterdrop?


I think they're something homemade and/or fired from an airgun at low speed (relative to a real bullet fired from an actual firearm).

To really freeze a bullet in mid-flight, a flash duration on the order of a microsecond (or less) is required. That's not really possible with a typical xenon flash tube. That, and the odd shape lead me to my conclusion.


That makes some sense to me. Of course, in the days of cloning, I got the idea that you could tie the bullet to a string and swing it down like a pendulum through the water drop then clone the string out. I'd think the image would look the same and one would think it would be much easier to obtain. But a low speed airgun of some sort makes sense too.
06/09/2011 12:08:46 PM · #18
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Originally posted by Spork99:

Originally posted by DrAchoo:

I'm curious what kind of pellet is shaped like that and is slightly bigger than a waterdrop?


I think they're something homemade and/or fired from an airgun at low speed (relative to a real bullet fired from an actual firearm).

To really freeze a bullet in mid-flight, a flash duration on the order of a microsecond (or less) is required. That's not really possible with a typical xenon flash tube. That, and the odd shape lead me to my conclusion.


That makes some sense to me. Of course, in the days of cloning, I got the idea that you could tie the bullet to a string and swing it down like a pendulum through the water drop then clone the string out. I'd think the image would look the same and one would think it would be much easier to obtain. But a low speed airgun of some sort makes sense too.


Interesting idea... but it seems like that would be infinitely harder because there is more variation in the bullet's orientation as well as it hitting perfectly. The drops can be done in exactly the same place by using a tube that stays stationary and has a hole just large enough to drop drops at the correct speed and the gun needn't ever move... the timing of the bullet to the scene of the photo will change very little and is more than likely done with a timer, so it's just all automated and you pick out the best results.

Message edited by author 2011-06-09 12:09:15.
06/09/2011 01:04:12 PM · #19
Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by GinaRothfels:

Originally posted by Adz:

Originally posted by gattamarta:

This guy too does breathtaking waterdrops...


Thanks for that, most of them are 1cm in height!


Click on the small photos or left and right arrows to see that at a decent size.


I actually meant the water drops lol, there's one of them with a 10mm ruler next to it and it only just reaches the top of it!


As soon as I posted that I thought I'd probably got it wrong. I didn't notice the ruler.


Well, it is actually 10 cm tall!

The "mm" stands for the width of each interval between the small lines, it's also confirmed in the comments, let alone I have never seen a ruler splitting millimeters :)

Glad you liked it!
06/09/2011 01:29:17 PM · #20
Originally posted by spiritualspatula:

Interesting idea... but it seems like that would be infinitely harder because there is more variation in the bullet's orientation as well as it hitting perfectly. The drops can be done in exactly the same place by using a tube that stays stationary and has a hole just large enough to drop drops at the correct speed and the gun needn't ever move... the timing of the bullet to the scene of the photo will change very little and is more than likely done with a timer, so it's just all automated and you pick out the best results.


You are probably right.
06/09/2011 01:51:49 PM · #21
Originally posted by Skip:

now irene's gonna get a gun ;-)


HAHAHAHAHAHA!!!! XD
only if she sees this thread!
06/09/2011 02:01:52 PM · #22
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Originally posted by Spork99:

Originally posted by DrAchoo:

I'm curious what kind of pellet is shaped like that and is slightly bigger than a waterdrop?


I think they're something homemade and/or fired from an airgun at low speed (relative to a real bullet fired from an actual firearm).

To really freeze a bullet in mid-flight, a flash duration on the order of a microsecond (or less) is required. That's not really possible with a typical xenon flash tube. That, and the odd shape lead me to my conclusion.


That makes some sense to me. Of course, in the days of cloning, I got the idea that you could tie the bullet to a string and swing it down like a pendulum through the water drop then clone the string out. I'd think the image would look the same and one would think it would be much easier to obtain. But a low speed airgun of some sort makes sense too.


The suppose bullet not travel straight on photo 14. Very possible it was swing by a turning wheel. The drop then could be accurately adjust to it path.
06/09/2011 02:22:09 PM · #23
Wow!

Is this true?
06/09/2011 02:29:19 PM · #24
Originally posted by alexlky:

Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Originally posted by Spork99:

Originally posted by DrAchoo:

I'm curious what kind of pellet is shaped like that and is slightly bigger than a waterdrop?


I think they're something homemade and/or fired from an airgun at low speed (relative to a real bullet fired from an actual firearm).

To really freeze a bullet in mid-flight, a flash duration on the order of a microsecond (or less) is required. That's not really possible with a typical xenon flash tube. That, and the odd shape lead me to my conclusion.


That makes some sense to me. Of course, in the days of cloning, I got the idea that you could tie the bullet to a string and swing it down like a pendulum through the water drop then clone the string out. I'd think the image would look the same and one would think it would be much easier to obtain. But a low speed airgun of some sort makes sense too.


The suppose bullet not travel straight on photo 14. Very possible it was swing by a turning wheel. The drop then could be accurately adjust to it path.


It was photo 15 that made me think of the idea. I have no idea if it is true and I'd actually give the dude the benefit of the doubt, but since I don't have an airgun, if I did it, that's how I'd do it. :)
06/09/2011 03:05:44 PM · #25
Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Originally posted by alexlky:

Originally posted by DrAchoo:

Originally posted by Spork99:

Originally posted by DrAchoo:

I'm curious what kind of pellet is shaped like that and is slightly bigger than a waterdrop?


I think they're something homemade and/or fired from an airgun at low speed (relative to a real bullet fired from an actual firearm).

To really freeze a bullet in mid-flight, a flash duration on the order of a microsecond (or less) is required. That's not really possible with a typical xenon flash tube. That, and the odd shape lead me to my conclusion.


That makes some sense to me. Of course, in the days of cloning, I got the idea that you could tie the bullet to a string and swing it down like a pendulum through the water drop then clone the string out. I'd think the image would look the same and one would think it would be much easier to obtain. But a low speed airgun of some sort makes sense too.



The suppose bullet not travel straight on photo 14. Very possible it was swing by a turning wheel. The drop then could be accurately adjust to it path.


It was photo 15 that made me think of the idea. I have no idea if it is true and I'd actually give the dude the benefit of the doubt, but since I don't have an airgun, if I did it, that's how I'd do it. :)


As an example, here is a shot I made using a 0.5 microsecond flash (much faster than any camera flash), stopping a .22LR projectile. The velocity of the projectile is 1100-1200 ft/s. Despite the short duration of the light, there is some small amount of blur in the projectile's image.

Copyrighted_Image_Reuse_Prohibited_861430.jpg

Compare this to the images of the projectiles in the original link and it's pretty easy to see that the projectiles used there were moving at a much slower speed given that their flash duration was likely much longer than 0.5 microseconds and the lack of blur in the image. Now, also look at the projectile in image #15, it's totally frozen in space. There are no rifling marks from the grooves normally cut into a barrel to spin and thus stabilize the projectile. Then look at the shape of the projectile itself and it's a long cylinder with a much shorter rounded cone for a point...this is not typical for either a rifle or a pistol bullet. Usually, the straight cylinder portion is much shorter and the rounded taper is much longer.

This leads me to believe that this is a homemade projectile fired at a very low speed (maybe as low as 100-200 ft/sec) froma smooth bore airgun, probably homemade as well. I don't think that the projectile in image #14 is on a curved path, but rather is beginning to tumble due to the low speed.
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